Conspicuous Consumption

Started 3 months ago | Discussions
RDKirk Forum Pro • Posts: 15,171
Re: Conspicuous Consumption

Michael Fryd wrote:

RDKirk wrote:

Michael Fryd wrote:

Photomonkey wrote:

...

Good marketing is a total experience. From the first impression of your website to the phone or in person meeting. Projection of confidence and agreeability is a key determinant in getting the sale.

You are correct that the best marketing wins. My contention is that making a statement about gear is a rookie marketing mistake. My clients are commercial clients with a degree of sophistication that (IMO) would see such a declaration as a sign of insecurity and inexperience.

Good marketing is usually tailored to the the target market. The OP was talking about a wedding photographer. I suspect his target market is not as sophisticated as your commercial clients.

And as I said earlier, there are wedding websites and publications that explicitly tell brides to look for photographers who use specifically Canon and Nikon cameras.

Those brides might not know a Canon from a canary, but if The Knot tells them that's what they're supposed to look for, then that's what they'll look for.

RDKirk
'TANSTAAFL: The only unbreakable rule in photography.'

If your market is not sophisticated, you can educate them, and then list your gear to show you have better gear. The implication is that means the client will get better photos.

Say you had a Canon 50 Megapixel body. You could explain how higher resolution cameras provide more detailed images, and allow for larger prints. You would educate the client that the highest resolution body is 50 megapixels, and then you would make sure your gear list made it clear that you were shooting a 50 megapixel body.

If you were shooting a 42 megapixel body, you might make the case that 40 megapixels was the magic number, and anything less than that was substandard.

The key is to "educate" the potential client so that they "know" to look for someone with your gear list.

====

Now whether or not any of the "education" is correct is a different matter.

You mean those who actually contacted you rather than disqualifying you because they didn't see all the right checklist items on your website.

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RDKirk
'TANSTAAFL: The only unbreakable rule in photography.'

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Michael Fryd
Michael Fryd Forum Pro • Posts: 11,069
Re: Conspicuous Consumption

RDKirk wrote:

...

You mean those who actually contacted you rather than disqualifying you because they didn't see all the right checklist items on your website.

Marketing can be good, even if it turns away a few potential customers. If my marketing turns off one, potential customer, but brings in 10 more, then that marketing is an overall good thing.

I'm not saying whether one should or should not list gear on their web site.

What I am saying is that there are many different marketing strategies. The key to good marketing is to differentiate yourself from your competitors, and characterizing that difference as making you the better choice.

Some people see a great photo and think "he must have a really good camera".   Promoting that you have a "really good camera" isn't an inherently crazy idea.

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a7sastro Contributing Member • Posts: 714
projecting your mindset may hurt your business
1

lbuclk= wrote:

I was looking at another wedding photographer's web site and in the FAQ section was a short paragraph on "what kind camera do you use". the photographer explained his/her gear. in all my years of wedding shoots, I've never had that question asked.

I've never asked my dentist what kind of drill he uses or a chef, what brand pf knife he used. I was wondering how many others have been asked about their equipment?

Yes, DPR etc. sometimes makes techgear nerds think it is all about the tools and not the artist.

But there needn't be a binary either/or on the matter.

You raise the point that you don't ask your dentist/chef about the gear, but there are so many contras....

I notice all the time the type of plane I get on as a passenger.

I notice the type of car a chauffeur picks me up in...

I notice/ask the build year of the CT scanner I'm about to be subjected to.....

I would want to know the gear that was being used to shoot an event I paid for....

And I bet a foody might ask a Chef what his supplier/source of food____ would be.....

I also notice the brand of wine the waiter brings out to the table.....

I also notice the tools and the condition they are in (treatment) ,owned by any general contractor that comes on my property for work.....

You may 'live' in a the world that you don't care about details and additional information that may given insight into the collective whole of YOUR decision-making,

but you projecting this mindset onto everyone else as if it is the only correct way of thinking demonstrates you don't have a grasp on a set of the market of potential clients.

...Maybe you haven't been asked because you have self-filtered this group of clients out of your potentials. As long as you are getting work, then be happy....

But as others suggested some may be wisely offering this additional communication as a way to appeal to potential clients that will pay attention to such details.....

And for you to judge their intentions without knowledge is also another presumptuous matter in addition to your projection of your mindset as the only correct one...

Hopefully your work product backs up your ego, because you haven't advertised well on this thread..........

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OP lbuclk= Veteran Member • Posts: 4,260
I noticed you don't get too much sleep.

a7sastro wrote:

lbuclk= wrote:

I was looking at another wedding photographer's web site and in the FAQ section was a short paragraph on "what kind camera do you use". the photographer explained his/her gear. in all my years of wedding shoots, I've never had that question asked.

I've never asked my dentist what kind of drill he uses or a chef, what brand pf knife he used. I was wondering how many others have been asked about their equipment?

Yes, DPR etc. sometimes makes techgear nerds think it is all about the tools and not the artist.

But there needn't be a binary either/or on the matter.

You raise the point that you don't ask your dentist/chef about the gear, but there are so many contras....

I notice all the time the type of plane I get on as a passenger.

I notice the type of car a chauffeur picks me up in...

I notice/ask the build year of the CT scanner I'm about to be subjected to.....

I would want to know the gear that was being used to shoot an event I paid for....

And I bet a foody might ask a Chef what his supplier/source of food____ would be.....

I also notice the brand of wine the waiter brings out to the table.....

I also notice the tools and the condition they are in (treatment) ,owned by any general contractor that comes on my property for work.....

You may 'live' in a the world that you don't care about details and additional information that may given insight into the collective whole of YOUR decision-making,

but you projecting this mindset onto everyone else as if it is the only correct way of thinking demonstrates you don't have a grasp on a set of the market of potential clients.

...Maybe you haven't been asked because you have self-filtered this group of clients out of your potentials. As long as you are getting work, then be happy....

But as others suggested some may be wisely offering this additional communication as a way to appeal to potential clients that will pay attention to such details.....

And for you to judge their intentions without knowledge is also another presumptuous matter in addition to your projection of your mindset as the only correct one...

Hopefully your work product backs up your ego, because you haven't advertised well on this thread..........

I don't care what someone is working with, If it gets the job done so be it.  some people want to be seen with certain gear/people/cars etc. one assignment I shot a multi millionaire who had a hobby of taking photos of himself with VIP's like politicians, movie stars, porn stars. his favorite camera was a small pocket camera .  I didn't feel the need to ask the doctor what kind of equipment he was using when I had a kidney removed in 2017 . It all boils down to the individual,  focus on the outcome.

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AZBlue
AZBlue Senior Member • Posts: 2,187
Re: Conspicuous Consumption
1

lbuclk= wrote:

I was looking at another wedding photographer's web site and in the FAQ section was a short paragraph on "what kind camera do you use". the photographer explained his/her gear. in all my years of wedding shoots, I've never had that question asked.

I've never asked my dentist what kind of drill he uses or a chef, what brand pf knife he used. I was wondering how many others have been asked about their equipment?

You probably have no interest in dentistry, which is why you haven't asked. If you were an aspiring dentist and admired a particular dentist's work, you would probably be interested in how he/she achieves that level of quality.

Just because you aren't interested doesn't mean others aren't. I think it's great that a photographer would choose to discuss what they shoot with. That tells me they are a photography enthusiast and interested in helping others.

I don't see anything wrong with that.

lbuclk= wrote:

Ken Seals wrote:

I fail to see what your post has to to with the title "Conspicuous Consumption".

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/conspicuous-consumption.asp

bottom line, something to be seen with in an attempt to impress someone with something you have.telling someone about your camera / gear does not mean you have the talent to use it.anyone can press a button.

Why do you think the photographer is trying to impress? If it makes you uncomfortable, which it apparently does because you posted about it, I suggest you explore the source of your own discomfort instead of trying to ascribe intention to the person who is simply sharing information for whatever reason that is unknown to you.

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OP lbuclk= Veteran Member • Posts: 4,260
To each his/her own op.

AZBlue wrote:

lbuclk= wrote:

I was looking at another wedding photographer's web site and in the FAQ section was a short paragraph on "what kind camera do you use". the photographer explained his/her gear. in all my years of wedding shoots, I've never had that question asked.

I've never asked my dentist what kind of drill he uses or a chef, what brand pf knife he used. I was wondering how many others have been asked about their equipment?

You probably have no interest in dentistry, which is why you haven't asked. If you were an aspiring dentist and admired a particular dentist's work, you would probably be interested in how he/she achieves that level of quality.

Just because you aren't interested doesn't mean others aren't. I think it's great that a photographer would choose to discuss what they shoot with. That tells me they are a photography enthusiast and interested in helping others.

I don't see anything wrong with that.

lbuclk= wrote:

Ken Seals wrote:

I fail to see what your post has to to with the title "Conspicuous Consumption".

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/conspicuous-consumption.asp

bottom line, something to be seen with in an attempt to impress someone with something you have.telling someone about your camera / gear does not mean you have the talent to use it.anyone can press a button.

Why do you think the photographer is trying to impress? If it makes you uncomfortable, which it apparently does because you posted about it, I suggest you explore the source of your own discomfort instead of trying to ascribe intention to the person who is simply sharing information for whatever reason that is unknown to you.

1. re-read my post.  I said I've never had anyone ask that question, I DID ask How many others have been asked that question, out of the few hundred I've done, no one has ever asked.

2. does any, any of your customers ask that question? and understand the equipment after you educate them??

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Photomonkey Senior Member • Posts: 2,485
Re: To each his/her own op.

The ONLY client who ever asked me that question was a graphic designer who was hiring me for architectural photography. He had hired another who had used a 12 MP Olympus and while he liked the image, it was insufficient for the project.

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Biggs23 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,456
Re: Conspicuous Consumption

lbuclk= wrote:

I was looking at another wedding photographer's web site and in the FAQ section was a short paragraph on "what kind camera do you use". the photographer explained his/her gear. in all my years of wedding shoots, I've never had that question asked.

I've never asked my dentist what kind of drill he uses or a chef, what brand pf knife he used. I was wondering how many others have been asked about their equipment?

In ~190 weddings, I've only been asked once, and that was by a bride who brought a list of 150+ questions to ask that she printed off the internet.

I have, however, been asked MANY times by guests attending weddings.

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AZBlue
AZBlue Senior Member • Posts: 2,187
Re: To each his/her own op.
1

lbuclk= wrote:

1. re-read my post. I said I've never had anyone ask that question, I DID ask How many others have been asked that question, out of the few hundred I've done, no one has ever asked.

2. does any, any of your customers ask that question? and understand the equipment after you educate them??

You're asking these questions in order to be rhetorical IOW seeking confirmation of a pre-existing bias. You can't separate your question from the context. People ask me all the time and I'm happy to share. It's natural to be curious. Why should I care why someone asks me? The only reason to do that is to make myself feel smug or superior, which I do not. I offer information to anyone who wants to know. I'm happy to do it, and proud that someone would see my work as something they would want to emulate.

For example, on a recent "fun family photo day" I shot HSS portraits of my elderly parents at a golf course here in Arizona. My husband assisted with my flash and softbox while I shot with my new Sigma Art 135mm f1.8 lens. We shot on the greenbelt behind a restaurant. About 2 or 3 people asked me how I was shooting, what I was shooting with, and I felt honored that they wanted to know and was very happy to share whatever I could offer.

Did I sit there wondering, why the heck do you want to know because it's not about the equipment, it's about me? No. It was a compliment and I took it graciously.

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OP lbuclk= Veteran Member • Posts: 4,260
Wow......proud of you! you did not shoot a wedding yayyyyy.

AZBlue wrote:

lbuclk= wrote:

1. re-read my post. I said I've never had anyone ask that question, I DID ask How many others have been asked that question, out of the few hundred I've done, no one has ever asked.

2. does any, any of your customers ask that question? and understand the equipment after you educate them??

You're asking these questions in order to be rhetorical IOW seeking confirmation of a pre-existing bias. You can't separate your question from the context. People ask me all the time and I'm happy to share. It's natural to be curious. Why should I care why someone asks me? The only reason to do that is to make myself feel smug or superior, which I do not. I offer information to anyone who wants to know. I'm happy to do it, and proud that someone would see my work as something they would want to emulate.

For example, on a recent "fun family photo day" I shot HSS portraits of my elderly parents at a golf course here in Arizona. My husband assisted with my flash and softbox while I shot with my new Sigma Art 135mm f1.8 lens. We shot on the greenbelt behind a restaurant. About 2 or 3 people asked me how I was shooting, what I was shooting with, and I felt honored that they wanted to know and was very happy to share whatever I could offer.

Did I sit there wondering, why the heck do you want to know because it's not about the equipment, it's about me? No. It was a compliment and I took it graciously.

lol

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Michael Fryd
Michael Fryd Forum Pro • Posts: 11,069
Re: Conspicuous Consumption
2

Biggs23 wrote:

...

In ~190 weddings, I've only been asked once, and that was by a bride who brought a list of 150+ questions to ask that she printed off the internet.

...

If you are relying on your potential customers to ask the questions, you're relying on passive marketing. Why not guide the potential customers to ask the questions that you want to answer?

Suppose you have a 50 megapixel body and your competitors have 42 megapixel bodies. You and I know they are both are overkill for wedding photography and in that context there is no significant difference between the two.

However, your marketing can "educate" your customers that higher resolution cameras produce images with more detail. Then it makes sense for your marketing   to mention your camera along with a notation "50 megapixels". Imply in your marketing that photographers who shoot low resolutions cameras usually don't list their gear, and/or don't mention the resolution.

====

If you bring studio lighting to the wedding reception, then educate potential clients why that is important, and get them to ask (and rule out) competitors who don't bring lighting.   If you use only on-camera lighting at the reception, educate potential clients as to why that's better, and get them to ask (and rule out) those that bring studio lights.

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Jacques Cornell
Jacques Cornell Forum Pro • Posts: 11,269
Re: Conspicuous Consumption
1

lbuclk= wrote:

I was looking at another wedding photographer's web site and in the FAQ section was a short paragraph on "what kind camera do you use". the photographer explained his/her gear. in all my years of wedding shoots, I've never had that question asked.

I've never asked my dentist what kind of drill he uses or a chef, what brand pf knife he used. I was wondering how many others have been asked about their equipment?

My gut reaction is that this is a relatively inexperienced photographer who's feeling insecure or doesn't know how to market his images. I might promote my gear's capabilities - what they make possible - but not the brand, model, or any other specific information about the gear itself.

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Michael Fryd
Michael Fryd Forum Pro • Posts: 11,069
Re: Conspicuous Consumption

Jacques Cornell wrote:

lbuclk= wrote:

I was looking at another wedding photographer's web site and in the FAQ section was a short paragraph on "what kind camera do you use". the photographer explained his/her gear. in all my years of wedding shoots, I've never had that question asked.

I've never asked my dentist what kind of drill he uses or a chef, what brand pf knife he used. I was wondering how many others have been asked about their equipment?

My gut reaction is that this is a relatively inexperienced photographer who's feeling insecure or doesn't know how to market his images. I might promote my gear's capabilities - what they make possible - but not the brand, model, or any other specific information about the gear itself.

The problem is that potential customers may not know how to judge whether or not your competitors have gear with similar capabilities.

Suppose you shoot with a model X camera from brand Y.

If you tell your potential customers that you have a full frame camera with 30 megapixels, then many of your competitors will have similar gear.

On the other hand, if you tell your potential customers what brand and model you have and convince them that this is the best camera to have, then you look better than competitors with similar cameras of a different model or brand.

====

Suppose your camera had a Foveon sensor.   Your marketing could "educate" potential customers why Foveon sensors produce better images than traditional cameras.  Done right, you could have your potential customers asking competitors about gear, and not considering anyone without a Sigma camera.

A very common and effective marketing strategy is to differentiate yourself from your competitors, and then convince potential clients that the difference is significant enough to make you the best choice.

Typical campaigns might include differentiating yourself based on, price, reliability, your personality, the gear you use, or even the quality of your work.

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Jacques Cornell
Jacques Cornell Forum Pro • Posts: 11,269
Re: Conspicuous Consumption

Michael Fryd wrote:

Jacques Cornell wrote:

lbuclk= wrote:

I was looking at another wedding photographer's web site and in the FAQ section was a short paragraph on "what kind camera do you use". the photographer explained his/her gear. in all my years of wedding shoots, I've never had that question asked.

I've never asked my dentist what kind of drill he uses or a chef, what brand pf knife he used. I was wondering how many others have been asked about their equipment?

My gut reaction is that this is a relatively inexperienced photographer who's feeling insecure or doesn't know how to market his images. I might promote my gear's capabilities - what they make possible - but not the brand, model, or any other specific information about the gear itself.

The problem is that potential customers may not know how to judge whether or not your competitors have gear with similar capabilities.

Suppose you shoot with a model X camera from brand Y.

If you tell your potential customers that you have a full frame camera with 30 megapixels, then many of your competitors will have similar gear.

On the other hand, if you tell your potential customers what brand and model you have and convince them that this is the best camera to have, then you look better than competitors with similar cameras of a different model or brand.

====

Suppose your camera had a Foveon sensor. Your marketing could "educate" potential customers why Foveon sensors produce better images than traditional cameras. Done right, you could have your potential customers asking competitors about gear, and not considering anyone without a Sigma camera.

A very common and effective marketing strategy is to differentiate yourself from your competitors, and then convince potential clients that the difference is significant enough to make you the best choice.

Typical campaigns might include differentiating yourself based on, price, reliability, your personality, the gear you use, or even the quality of your work.

These are not conversations I've ever had or heard of in 15 years of professional event work. IMHO, only camera geeks care about this stuff. Clients care about photos.

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Michael Fryd
Michael Fryd Forum Pro • Posts: 11,069
Re: Conspicuous Consumption

Jacques Cornell wrote:

Michael Fryd wrote:

Jacques Cornell wrote:

lbuclk= wrote:

I was looking at another wedding photographer's web site and in the FAQ section was a short paragraph on "what kind camera do you use". the photographer explained his/her gear. in all my years of wedding shoots, I've never had that question asked.

I've never asked my dentist what kind of drill he uses or a chef, what brand pf knife he used. I was wondering how many others have been asked about their equipment?

My gut reaction is that this is a relatively inexperienced photographer who's feeling insecure or doesn't know how to market his images. I might promote my gear's capabilities - what they make possible - but not the brand, model, or any other specific information about the gear itself.

The problem is that potential customers may not know how to judge whether or not your competitors have gear with similar capabilities.

Suppose you shoot with a model X camera from brand Y.

If you tell your potential customers that you have a full frame camera with 30 megapixels, then many of your competitors will have similar gear.

On the other hand, if you tell your potential customers what brand and model you have and convince them that this is the best camera to have, then you look better than competitors with similar cameras of a different model or brand.

====

Suppose your camera had a Foveon sensor. Your marketing could "educate" potential customers why Foveon sensors produce better images than traditional cameras. Done right, you could have your potential customers asking competitors about gear, and not considering anyone without a Sigma camera.

A very common and effective marketing strategy is to differentiate yourself from your competitors, and then convince potential clients that the difference is significant enough to make you the best choice.

Typical campaigns might include differentiating yourself based on, price, reliability, your personality, the gear you use, or even the quality of your work.

These are not conversations I've ever had or heard of in 15 years of professional event work. IMHO, only camera geeks care about this stuff. Clients care about photos.

Again, there are many different strategies for marketing you business.    Your strategy seems to be working well for your business, and that's a good thing.

However, I think it's naive to think that your strategy is the only successful strategy.

I am suggesting that a successful strategy can include promoting your equipment.  I am not saying that it is necessary to promote your gear.

You seem to be saying that you have never promoted your gear, and your strategy is successful.    There is no conflict between your experience and my position.

====

I am not a cook.  Yet a local restaurant promotes their use of wood fired ovens.  That works for them.  Obviously, not all restaurants promote their equipment, but some do, and it can be a successful strategy.

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Jacques Cornell
Jacques Cornell Forum Pro • Posts: 11,269
Re: Conspicuous Consumption

Michael Fryd wrote:

Jacques Cornell wrote:

Michael Fryd wrote:

Jacques Cornell wrote:

lbuclk= wrote:

I was looking at another wedding photographer's web site and in the FAQ section was a short paragraph on "what kind camera do you use". the photographer explained his/her gear. in all my years of wedding shoots, I've never had that question asked.

I've never asked my dentist what kind of drill he uses or a chef, what brand pf knife he used. I was wondering how many others have been asked about their equipment?

My gut reaction is that this is a relatively inexperienced photographer who's feeling insecure or doesn't know how to market his images. I might promote my gear's capabilities - what they make possible - but not the brand, model, or any other specific information about the gear itself.

The problem is that potential customers may not know how to judge whether or not your competitors have gear with similar capabilities.

Suppose you shoot with a model X camera from brand Y.

If you tell your potential customers that you have a full frame camera with 30 megapixels, then many of your competitors will have similar gear.

On the other hand, if you tell your potential customers what brand and model you have and convince them that this is the best camera to have, then you look better than competitors with similar cameras of a different model or brand.

====

Suppose your camera had a Foveon sensor. Your marketing could "educate" potential customers why Foveon sensors produce better images than traditional cameras. Done right, you could have your potential customers asking competitors about gear, and not considering anyone without a Sigma camera.

A very common and effective marketing strategy is to differentiate yourself from your competitors, and then convince potential clients that the difference is significant enough to make you the best choice.

Typical campaigns might include differentiating yourself based on, price, reliability, your personality, the gear you use, or even the quality of your work.

These are not conversations I've ever had or heard of in 15 years of professional event work. IMHO, only camera geeks care about this stuff. Clients care about photos.

Again, there are many different strategies for marketing you business. Your strategy seems to be working well for your business, and that's a good thing.

However, I think it's naive to think that your strategy is the only successful strategy.

I am suggesting that a successful strategy can include promoting your equipment. I am not saying that it is necessary to promote your gear.

You seem to be saying that you have never promoted your gear, and your strategy is successful. There is no conflict between your experience and my position.

====

I am not a cook. Yet a local restaurant promotes their use of wood fired ovens. That works for them. Obviously, not all restaurants promote their equipment, but some do, and it can be a successful strategy.

Most clients know the difference a wood-fired oven makes to the taste of the food. Most don't know the (often negligible) difference between a larger format and a smaller one, or an expensive lens and a cheaper one.

Aside from that, your post seems perfectly reasonable to me. I've seen you around here enough to know that you're a practical pro, not a demagogue. A couple of other points, though. First, there's a lot of angst out there among wannabes about clients basing their choices on gear. In my 20 years of experience, I have never encountered this. OTOH, I have had new clients hire me for weddings specifically because they liked my style. I think wannabes will benefit from being disabused of this worry so they can focus on selling their style. Second, if you choose to market your gear, you enter into a rather silly arms race that you may not be able to win if you're not rich.

Personally, I would regard any promotion extolling the virtues of expensive gear as a red flag. It would cause me to wonder if the photog has any tools in his problem-solving kit other than a credit card. I know veteran pros much better than me who shoot with modest gear and regularly produce work that blows the doors off almost all of what I see around here, winning international awards in the process. I'd hire them in a nanosecond over some guy with the latest and greatest.

I guess what I'm saying is not that one shouldn't discuss gear at all. But, an excessive focus or reliance on that as a marketing tool is likely to eclipse what most clients really care about, which is the effectiveness of their images. I've chosen not to say anything about my gear in my marketing, even when I was shooting Canon 1-series. But, if I were to bring it up, I'd mention what my gear lets me do, not what it is.

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"I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it." - George Bernard Shaw
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Michael Fryd
Michael Fryd Forum Pro • Posts: 11,069
Re: Conspicuous Consumption
2

Jacques Cornell wrote:

...

Most clients know the difference a wood-fired oven makes to the taste of the food. Most don't know the (often negligible) difference between a larger format and a smaller one, or an expensive lens and a cheaper one.

Apparently, you know more about cooking than I do.   I can guess as to the difference that a wood fired oven makes, but I have no practical experience or first hand knowledge.

I remember the old film days.  Potential clients knew very little about cameras, but they "knew" that they should hire a photographer that used medium format, and not a low end guy using 35mm.   They didn't know what the difference was, only that medium format resulted in "better" picture.

..

Personally, I would regard any promotion extolling the virtues of expensive gear as a red flag. It would cause me to wonder if the photog has any tools in his problem-solving kit other than a credit card. I know veteran pros much better than me who shoot with modest gear and regularly produce work that blows the doors off almost all of what I see around here, winning international awards in the process. I'd hire them in a nanosecond over some guy with the latest and greatest.

I agree that it would be a challenge to base your primary marketing on the gear you use. However, that's not the same as including your gear in your marketing.

I guess what I'm saying is not that one shouldn't discuss gear at all. But, an excessive focus or reliance on that as a marketing tool is likely to eclipse what most clients really care about, which is the effectiveness of their images. I've chosen not to say anything about my gear in my marketing, even when I was shooting Canon 1-series. But, if I were to bring it up, I'd mention what my gear lets me do, not what it is.

I agree that an excessive focus on gear may not be the most successful strategy, unless you have nothing else going for you.

Now, If your gear gives you unique, or unusual  abilities, then that might be something to promote a little bit.

In my case, it's high pixel counts.  For some people it will be high quality drone shots.  For others it might be gear to do high quality time lapse images that span days, weeks, or months.  As consumers generally don't understand gear, it helps to mention the gear, and then explain why they want a photographer with that gear.

I think my bottom line is that most clients (particularly consumers) don't have a good eye for what makes a good photograph.  In terms of whether or not they like your images, they will be more influenced by how you present your work (and the accompanying story) than by the work itself.

In terms of repeat business, I believe your personality is more important than the quality of your work.  Given two competent photographers, clients generally pick the one they like better or is easier to work with. Even if the other photographer produces a slightly better result.

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itsDing
itsDing Senior Member • Posts: 2,301
Re: Conspicuous Consumption
1

Go ak to 2005/6 and I bet some great wedding images were taken by Canons 20/30D cameras and still could be.

Michael Fryd
Michael Fryd Forum Pro • Posts: 11,069
Re: Conspicuous Consumption

itsDing wrote:

Go ak to 2005/6 and I bet some great wedding images were taken by Canons 20/30D cameras and still could be.

Yes.  I still have my 20D.   However, I haven't used it in years.  Newer models of camera make my job easier, and allow me to provide a higher quality product to my clients.

If you were getting married today, and had to choose between two equally skilled photographers, would you prefer the one with a 20D, or the one with a current model DSLR?

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itsDing
itsDing Senior Member • Posts: 2,301
Re: Conspicuous Consumption
1

Any that did the job to the satisfaction of the clients.

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