Sony RX100 VA vs VI

Started 2 months ago | Discussions
jmagbita Regular Member • Posts: 129
Sony RX100 VA vs VI

Greetings All!  
I've read the many threads regarding the difference between these two models, but have two very specific scenarios to compare.

As for my type of photography, mainly travel.

I love wide angle type shots that show entire spaces, think "travel magazine" type shots that clearly show where one is. i.e. shots in front of the Louvre, Piccadilly Circus, inside the St. Peter's in the Vatican or any other iconic location.

I also enjoy evening type shots of the same locations and also interior spaces.

This makes me think definitely the RX100VA would be the obvious choice between the two, but I've come across a few posts wherein users say the 1.8 of the VA is marginally better than the 2.8 of the VI.  Also, I read the pop up lens of the VI is much greater than the VA.  Another post mentions the ergonomics of the VI is better than the VA.  (I thought it was the same body and buttons?)

With all that said, I'm still confused as to which model to buy.  Thoughts?

Thanks!

Sony RX100 VA
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tbcass
tbcass Forum Pro • Posts: 41,749
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI
 tbcass's gear list:tbcass's gear list
Sony RX100 Sony RX10 IV Sony a99 II Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 Di Macro Sony DT 35mm F1.8 SAM +10 more
SeeTheWorld
SeeTheWorld Regular Member • Posts: 312
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

jmagbita wrote:

Greetings All!
I've read the many threads regarding the difference between these two models, but have two very specific scenarios to compare.

As for my type of photography, mainly travel.

I love wide angle type shots that show entire spaces, think "travel magazine" type shots that clearly show where one is. i.e. shots in front of the Louvre, Piccadilly Circus, inside the St. Peter's in the Vatican or any other iconic location.

I also enjoy evening type shots of the same locations and also interior spaces.

This makes me think definitely the RX100VA would be the obvious choice between the two, but I've come across a few posts wherein users say the 1.8 of the VA is marginally better than the 2.8 of the VI. Also, I read the pop up lens of the VI is much greater than the VA. Another post mentions the ergonomics of the VI is better than the VA. (I thought it was the same body and buttons?)

With all that said, I'm still confused as to which model to buy. Thoughts?

Thanks!

I'm new to the VI or M6, as it just arrived yesterday.  The body seems the same as my M4, except the lens seems to project a tad more in "off" in the M6 than in the M4.  It still fits in the back pocket of my jeans.  On the M4, I had the optional grip and that made handling much more solid.

Unfortunately, I offered my M4 to a nephew thinking the M6 was the same as the M4, only with a zoom.  It's not because of the slower lens.  People who post here, who's knowledge I admire, say the difference in the lens is negligible. After watching countless YouTube vids on the topic, and taking photos in the shade yesterday afternoon, I find that I respectfully disagree and wish I'd held on to my M4.

Because I also have the RX10M3 with the 600 mm reach, I may exchange this M6 for the M5a.  I tend to take the same type of travel photos as you do, so the faster lens with less zoom will be more practical.  I use the longer zooms for wildlife and the 600mm of the RX10M3 is more useful for wildlife.  I wouldn't need to carry both lenses at the same time because the uses are so different.

On the other hand, the touch screen focus is helpful to me.  I'm one who panics a little when having to make adjustments quickly.  I lose shots.  So, the touch screen focus would come in handy.  Too bad Sony didn't also put it on the 5a.

This is a difficult decision.  Best wishes in your search.  I'm still weighing the differences.

-- hide signature --

Mary
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world . . ." Margaret Mead

 SeeTheWorld's gear list:SeeTheWorld's gear list
Canon PowerShot D10 Canon PowerShot G5 Canon PowerShot G11 Sony RX10 IV Sony RX100 VI +8 more
Anders_K Regular Member • Posts: 337
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

You asked for thoughts: G7X II

I returned my RX100VA for poor ergonomy reasons (and a problem with the battery door).

Guy Parsons
Guy Parsons Forum Pro • Posts: 31,834
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI
5

jmagbita wrote:

Greetings All!
I've read the many threads regarding the difference between these two models, but have two very specific scenarios to compare.

As for my type of photography, mainly travel.

I love wide angle type shots that show entire spaces, think "travel magazine" type shots that clearly show where one is. i.e. shots in front of the Louvre, Piccadilly Circus, inside the St. Peter's in the Vatican or any other iconic location.

I also enjoy evening type shots of the same locations and also interior spaces.

This makes me think definitely the RX100VA would be the obvious choice between the two, but I've come across a few posts wherein users say the 1.8 of the VA is marginally better than the 2.8 of the VI. Also, I read the pop up lens of the VI is much greater than the VA. Another post mentions the ergonomics of the VI is better than the VA. (I thought it was the same body and buttons?)

With all that said, I'm still confused as to which model to buy. Thoughts?

Thanks!

Just back from two weeks in Singapore and the M6 served me well for both daylight and dim light shots. Most times in P mode and let it do its thing. When light gets too low it's easiest to set to the Auto dial mode and the camera chooses what it thinks is the correct scene mode for the situation, it works well.

On the night flight home (over 7 hours with nothing to do) where the cabin lights were so dim I couldn't see detail I tried a few more shots with the Auto mode and it variously chose electronic shutter stack modes where the indicated ISO was variously 8,000 -10,000 - 25,600 and all the results are usable as screen display or small prints. They will look better of course once I get around to using DxO+Prime to process the raw files. Normally now I have auto ISO set to 3200 limit for the usual P mode shots, the P mode 6400 shots are a bit noisy but again usable for screen display or small prints and again will look better once the raw files are processed.

The big, no, make that the huge advantage of the M6 is the "24mm to 200mm" zoom range. That simply allows a much more interesting range of shots to be taken. The bigger zoom range is hugely more important than any slight aperture difference in the M5A. Even an M6 post process crop to "400mm" leaves me with what is basically a very usable 5MP image and that is good.

For a couple of years I have used M4/3 with the excellent 12-40/2.8 lens so convinced myself I was happy with that "24mm to 80mm" range, I did carry other lenses but the usual problem when travelling is the time and effort needed to keep swapping lenses for the scenes that happen, some happen too quickly to allow a swap.

The M6 solved that zoom range problem plus it performs OK in low light. So it is the very obvious travel small camera choice.

I bought the first M6 for my wife to replace an ageing Casio pocket camera that really did not deliver when the light got low. The M6 worked so well that I abandoned any thoughts of the M5A for myself and bought another M6 and am 100% happy that I did so.

Other points are that as a screen user the M6 default setting is way too dim so I changed the screen to "Sunny Weather" and that was bright enough for me for two weeks in the mostly sunny weather to never have to pop up that EVF.

People who use Polaroid glasses will find the screen black when in landscape mode, that was a big mistake for Sony to choose that screen.

The EVF on the M5A is an awkward pain to use compared to the smooth acting EVF on the M6.

The touch screen on the M6 is barely implemented but it allows me to slide the single focus point around but usually keep it to the centre. On review a double tap on the screen zooms to see detail where you tap, a finger slides the image around and another double tap takes it back to normal - that is very convenient.

So me with an M6 in a small belt pouch and my wife with an M6 in a home-made padded sleeve inside her handbag and we could cover all that we needed with no fuss and little to carry.

Recharge both cameras each night and only once needed to change a battery when my wife took over 300 shots one day. Memory cards backed up to an old WD Wireless Passport so we came home with the backup plus the 64gig cards in each camera holding it all, never had to use a spare card. Cards needed are U3 type to allow best quality 4K video clips, plus better buffer clearing times.

The only thing I missed from not having my M4/3 gear was my Samyang fisheye lens, there were quite a few situations where the 7.5mm fisheye would suit nicely and also some occasions where a de-fished image would make for a nicer wider shot that the M6 cannot do unless I stitch. Next trip it will most likely be M6 plus M4/3 as the backup and not the other way 'round.

Summary: For me the M6 is the ideal travel camera.

Regards..... Guy

 Guy Parsons's gear list:Guy Parsons's gear list
Sony RX100 VI Olympus PEN E-P5 Olympus PEN E-PL1 Olympus PEN E-P3 Olympus PEN E-PL5 +2 more
nigelbb Contributing Member • Posts: 535
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

SeeTheWorld wrote:

jmagbita wrote:

Greetings All!
I've read the many threads regarding the difference between these two models, but have two very specific scenarios to compare.

As for my type of photography, mainly travel.

I love wide angle type shots that show entire spaces, think "travel magazine" type shots that clearly show where one is. i.e. shots in front of the Louvre, Piccadilly Circus, inside the St. Peter's in the Vatican or any other iconic location.

I also enjoy evening type shots of the same locations and also interior spaces.

This makes me think definitely the RX100VA would be the obvious choice between the two, but I've come across a few posts wherein users say the 1.8 of the VA is marginally better than the 2.8 of the VI. Also, I read the pop up lens of the VI is much greater than the VA. Another post mentions the ergonomics of the VI is better than the VA. (I thought it was the same body and buttons?)

With all that said, I'm still confused as to which model to buy. Thoughts?

Thanks!

I'm new to the VI or M6, as it just arrived yesterday. The body seems the same as my M4, except the lens seems to project a tad more in "off" in the M6 than in the M4. It still fits in the back pocket of my jeans. On the M4, I had the optional grip and that made handling much more solid.

Unfortunately, I offered my M4 to a nephew thinking the M6 was the same as the M4, only with a zoom. It's not because of the slower lens. People who post here, who's knowledge I admire, say the difference in the lens is negligible. After watching countless YouTube vids on the topic, and taking photos in the shade yesterday afternoon, I find that I respectfully disagree and wish I'd held on to my M4.

Specifically what issue are you being in shade? What mode? What shutter speed? What ISO?

I have other cameras but have never taken a photo with the RX100M6 in low light & thought "This image is unusable. I wish I had an extra stop of light & shorter zoom range." I cannot emphasise enough how great the extra 70-200mm zoom is not just as a telephoto to make far objects closer but in superior framing & especially portraits & macro.

Because I also have the RX10M3 with the 600 mm reach, I may exchange this M6 for the M5a. I tend to take the same type of travel photos as you do, so the faster lens with less zoom will be more practical. I use the longer zooms for wildlife and the 600mm of the RX10M3 is more useful for wildlife. I wouldn't need to carry both lenses at the same time because the uses are so different.

Until you have had 24-200mm FF equivalent in your pocket you really don't appreciate that zoom range. The image quality is identical to the RX10M3 & RX10M4 but it fits in your pocket.

The RX10M3/4 & RX100M5A/6 don't really complement one another as if you are carrying the vastly bigger RX10 then there is no point having the RX100M6 in your pocket. You will carry one or the other & in my case 90% of the time it's the RX100M6 because of the 200mm reach. I had an RX100M5A & aside from the really irritating EVF the lack of reach was really limiting.

On the other hand, the touch screen focus is helpful to me. I'm one who panics a little when having to make adjustments quickly. I lose shots. So, the touch screen focus would come in handy. Too bad Sony didn't also put it on the 5a.

I always use the EVF & hate the rear screen for framing so I have the touch screen switched off as my nose kept moving the focus point.

 nigelbb's gear list:nigelbb's gear list
Sony RX10 IV Sony RX100 VI Nikon D810 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Nikon AF-S Micro-Nikkor 105mm F2.8G IF-ED VR +1 more
nigelbb Contributing Member • Posts: 535
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI
2

Guy Parsons wrote:

The big, no, make that the huge advantage of the M6 is the "24mm to 200mm" zoom range. That simply allows a much more interesting range of shots to be taken. The bigger zoom range is hugely more important than any slight aperture difference in the M5A. Even an M6 post process crop to "400mm" leaves me with what is basically a very usable 5MP image and that is good.

For a couple of years I have used M4/3 with the excellent 12-40/2.8 lens so convinced myself I was happy with that "24mm to 80mm" range, I did carry other lenses but the usual problem when travelling is the time and effort needed to keep swapping lenses for the scenes that happen, some happen too quickly to allow a swap.

The M6 solved that zoom range problem plus it performs OK in low light. So it is the very obvious travel small camera choice.

What Guy said. Until you have had 24-200mm FF equivalent in your pocket you really cannot appreciate how useful that extra zoom range is. That extra 70-200mm is so useful & comparing the RX100M6 & RX100M5A side by side I really didn't see any great advantage in lower levels of light for one with the shorter zoom & that EVF is such a PITA that there was simply no contest.

 nigelbb's gear list:nigelbb's gear list
Sony RX10 IV Sony RX100 VI Nikon D810 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Nikon AF-S Micro-Nikkor 105mm F2.8G IF-ED VR +1 more
tbcass
tbcass Forum Pro • Posts: 41,749
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI
1

SeeTheWorld wrote:

Unfortunately, I offered my M4 to a nephew thinking the M6 was the same as the M4, only with a zoom. It's not because of the slower lens. People who post here, who's knowledge I admire, say the difference in the lens is negligible.

People who say the difference between the two is negligible probably don't photograph in low available light. As long as there is enough light to keep ISO below 800-1600 you may not notice much if any difference. I will also add that what can be considered negligible varies from person to person.

In the end you must decide which is more valuable, the 70-200mm range or a stop to stop and a half extra noise and resultant decrease in detail and dynamic range at higher ISO.

A few years ago I made a similar decision when I decided the extra zoom of the RX10iii was more valuable to me than the faster lens in the RX10ii.

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Tom

 tbcass's gear list:tbcass's gear list
Sony RX100 Sony RX10 IV Sony a99 II Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 Di Macro Sony DT 35mm F1.8 SAM +10 more
SeeTheWorld
SeeTheWorld Regular Member • Posts: 312
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

nigelbb wrote:

Guy Parsons wrote:

The big, no, make that the huge advantage of the M6 is the "24mm to 200mm" zoom range. That simply allows a much more interesting range of shots to be taken. The bigger zoom range is hugely more important than any slight aperture difference in the M5A. Even an M6 post process crop to "400mm" leaves me with what is basically a very usable 5MP image and that is good.

For a couple of years I have used M4/3 with the excellent 12-40/2.8 lens so convinced myself I was happy with that "24mm to 80mm" range, I did carry other lenses but the usual problem when travelling is the time and effort needed to keep swapping lenses for the scenes that happen, some happen too quickly to allow a swap.

The M6 solved that zoom range problem plus it performs OK in low light. So it is the very obvious travel small camera choice.

What Guy said. Until you have had 24-200mm FF equivalent in your pocket you really cannot appreciate how useful that extra zoom range is. That extra 70-200mm is so useful & comparing the RX100M6 & RX100M5A side by side I really didn't see any great advantage in lower levels of light for one with the shorter zoom & that EVF is such a PITA that there was simply no contest.

Thank you both for these fully thought-out discussions of the M5a vs the M6!  I will keep the M6 in n my pocket as I’m sure you’re both right about the zoom and framing advantages.  Personally, I’ve historically been an EVF shooter, but I found I appreciated the touch focus on the M6.   When I have on my polarized glasses, I switch back to the EVF.  Thanks again!

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Mary
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world . . ." Margaret Mead

 SeeTheWorld's gear list:SeeTheWorld's gear list
Canon PowerShot D10 Canon PowerShot G5 Canon PowerShot G11 Sony RX10 IV Sony RX100 VI +8 more
Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 8,318
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

tbcass wrote:

SeeTheWorld wrote:

Unfortunately, I offered my M4 to a nephew thinking the M6 was the same as the M4, only with a zoom. It's not because of the slower lens. People who post here, who's knowledge I admire, say the difference in the lens is negligible.

People who say the difference between the two is negligible probably don't photograph in low available light. As long as there is enough light to keep ISO below 800-1600 you may not notice much if any difference. I will also add that what can be considered negligible varies from person to person.

In the end you must decide which is more valuable, the 70-200mm range or a stop to stop and a half extra noise and resultant decrease in detail and dynamic range at higher ISO.

A few years ago I made a similar decision when I decided the extra zoom of the RX10iii was more valuable to me than the faster lens in the RX10ii.

The RX100M6 has pretty good OSS: this is a handheld shot:

Treasury of Atreus, Mycenae, Greece. This tholos tomb from 1250BC had the world's highest, widest, unsupported domed roof for over a thousand years

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tbcass
tbcass Forum Pro • Posts: 41,749
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI
2

My comment was about high ISO, not IS.

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Tom

 tbcass's gear list:tbcass's gear list
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Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 8,318
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

tbcass wrote:

My comment was about high ISO, not IS.

Surely it's obvious that the two are closely connected?

I was able to use a low ISO in that shot because of the low shutter speed that's enabled by the excellent OSS. I'd have needed a faster shutter speed with any of the older RX100 models, as their OSS isn't as good. That's the reason the RX100M6 is surprisingly good in low light.

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SeeTheWorld
SeeTheWorld Regular Member • Posts: 312
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

TDigital Nigel wrote:

tbcass wrote:

SeeTheWorld wrote:

Unfortunately, I offered my M4 to a nephew thinking the M6 was the same as the M4, only with a zoom. It's not because of the slower lens. People who post here, who's knowledge I admire, say the difference in the lens is negligible.

People who say the difference between the two is negligible probably don't photograph in low available light. As long as there is enough light to keep ISO below 800-1600 you may not notice much if any difference. I will also add that what can be considered negligible varies from person to person.

In the end you must decide which is more valuable, the 70-200mm range or a stop to stop and a half extra noise and resultant decrease in detail and dynamic range at higher ISO.

A few years ago I made a similar decision when I decided the extra zoom of the RX10iii was more valuable to me than the faster lens in the RX10ii.

The RX100M6 has pretty good OSS: this is a handheld shot:

Treasury of Atreus, Mycenae, Greece. This tholos tomb from 1250BC had the world's highest, widest, unsupported domed roof for over a thousand years

That’s a beautiful shot and interesting caption too.

-- hide signature --

Mary
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world . . ." Margaret Mead

 SeeTheWorld's gear list:SeeTheWorld's gear list
Canon PowerShot D10 Canon PowerShot G5 Canon PowerShot G11 Sony RX10 IV Sony RX100 VI +8 more
Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 8,318
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

SeeTheWorld wrote:

TDigital Nigel wrote:

tbcass wrote:

SeeTheWorld wrote:

Unfortunately, I offered my M4 to a nephew thinking the M6 was the same as the M4, only with a zoom. It's not because of the slower lens. People who post here, who's knowledge I admire, say the difference in the lens is negligible.

People who say the difference between the two is negligible probably don't photograph in low available light. As long as there is enough light to keep ISO below 800-1600 you may not notice much if any difference. I will also add that what can be considered negligible varies from person to person.

In the end you must decide which is more valuable, the 70-200mm range or a stop to stop and a half extra noise and resultant decrease in detail and dynamic range at higher ISO.

A few years ago I made a similar decision when I decided the extra zoom of the RX10iii was more valuable to me than the faster lens in the RX10ii.

The RX100M6 has pretty good OSS: this is a handheld shot:

Treasury of Atreus, Mycenae, Greece. This tholos tomb from 1250BC had the world's highest, widest, unsupported domed roof for over a thousand years

That’s a beautiful shot and interesting caption too.

Amazingly, even after 3270 years, the tomb still sets the world record in another respect: it has the largest-ever lintel stone. And now we use concrete or steel, the record will presumably never be broken. More pics in:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157706650470381

 Digital Nigel's gear list:Digital Nigel's gear list
Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Nikon Coolpix P900 Panasonic ZS100 Sony RX10 III +15 more
elliottnewcomb Forum Pro • Posts: 16,642
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

Mary,

Not a great first day. How close is your nephew? Not to take it back, but to borrow it to have real side by side comparisons. Not yet, wait a week or so if you can.

It is going to be very interesting to see how your first few weeks go with the m6. I worked myself (and people here following my histronics) into a tizzy. I assume you have a 30 day return option, so I encourage you to work hard to get the best you can out of the m6 before you finally decide.

To be positive while trying it, you might assume you have a brighter version also, so just see what can this one do. My brighter m3 is in the car door waiting, in the dark, for the dark, but not getting any action.

It took me a while, and I had 6 years experience with my m1, m3.

Aside from the diopter lever that is solved now, I sent one m6 back, changed my mind, got and kept this one. I am very glad I did.

When it matters, low light, it becomes about shutter speed to get the ISO low, thus S mode Auto ISO for me.

Stills/IS: I can reliably use slower shutter speeds handheld with the m6 than the m3 (m6 1/20th my default, even 1/15th) (m3 1/30th my default), I suggest you explore that specifically, for me that is the key to getting the f2.8 lens results closer to what the f1.8 lens can do when light is a challenge.

If motion involved in low light, m6 is not your friend, better learn how to use it's flash and flash compensation to get just enough flash, not too much. I still need to do that.

Secondarily, over and over again I am surprised how high the ISO is in m6 shots I find acceptable. That advantage is for Jpegs only, involving the in-camera Noise Reduction, more aggressive in the m6 than prior models.

Enough light, you can use any mode successfully, and then all the advantages of the new lens are there, not only reach, some very nice shallow focus depth un-achievable with any of the shorter reach models.

btw, I just shot museum photos with Bill, using MFNR, multi-frame noise reduction, an ISO option (top line, ISO Auto, MFNR, icon shows multiple shots). I didn't take any regular single frame photos for direct comparison, but I got some very nice results, didn't even think about my m3.

It comes down to this: It's the m6 I would regret leaving home, not my m3.

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Elliott

 elliottnewcomb's gear list:elliottnewcomb's gear list
Sony RX1R Olympus Stylus 1 Sony RX100 III Olympus Stylus 1s Sony RX100 VI +1 more
SeeTheWorld
SeeTheWorld Regular Member • Posts: 312
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

elliottnewcomb wrote:

Mary,

Not a great first day. How close is your nephew? Not to take it back, but to borrow it to have real side by side comparisons. Not yet, wait a week or so if you can.

It is going to be very interesting to see how your first few weeks go with the m6. I worked myself (and people here following my histronics) into a tizzy. I assume you have a 30 day return option, so I encourage you to work hard to get the best you can out of the m6 before you finally decide.

To be positive while trying it, you might assume you have a brighter version also, so just see what can this one do. My brighter m3 is in the car door waiting, in the dark, for the dark, but not getting any action.

It took me a while, and I had 6 years experience with my m1, m3.

Aside from the diopter lever that is solved now, I sent one m6 back, changed my mind, got and kept this one. I am very glad I did.

When it matters, low light, it becomes about shutter speed to get the ISO low, thus S mode Auto ISO for me.

Stills/IS: I can reliably use slower shutter speeds handheld with the m6 than the m3 (m6 1/20th my default, even 1/15th) (m3 1/30th my default), I suggest you explore that specifically, for me that is the key to getting the f2.8 lens results closer to what the f1.8 lens can do when light is a challenge.

If motion involved in low light, m6 is not your friend, better learn how to use it's flash and flash compensation to get just enough flash, not too much. I still need to do that.

Secondarily, over and over again I am surprised how high the ISO is in m6 shots I find acceptable. That advantage is for Jpegs only, involving the in-camera Noise Reduction, more aggressive in the m6 than prior models.

Enough light, you can use any mode successfully, and then all the advantages of the new lens are there, not only reach, some very nice shallow focus depth un-achievable with any of the shorter reach models.

btw, I just shot museum photos with Bill, using MFNR, multi-frame noise reduction, an ISO option (top line, ISO Auto, MFNR, icon shows multiple shots). I didn't take any regular single frame photos for direct comparison, but I got some very nice results, didn't even think about my m3.

It comes down to this: It's the m6 I would regret leaving home, not my m3.

Thank you for explaining all that, Elliott.  I'm fascinated by the MFNR, which I'm glad you gave me the phrase for, and will check that out.  All the advisors here on DPreview are suggesting the M6 is the way to go, and I am in agreement.

My nephew is many hours away.  And, I am glad he's interested in learning about photography.  He's a very intelligent 32 year old.  If he sets his mind to it, he'll know and understand more that me in short order.  That will be fun!

-- hide signature --

Mary
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world . . ." Margaret Mead

 SeeTheWorld's gear list:SeeTheWorld's gear list
Canon PowerShot D10 Canon PowerShot G5 Canon PowerShot G11 Sony RX10 IV Sony RX100 VI +8 more
SeeTheWorld
SeeTheWorld Regular Member • Posts: 312
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

Digital Nigel wrote:

SeeTheWorld wrote:

TDigital Nigel wrote:

tbcass wrote:

SeeTheWorld wrote:

Unfortunately, I offered my M4 to a nephew thinking the M6 was the same as the M4, only with a zoom. It's not because of the slower lens. People who post here, who's knowledge I admire, say the difference in the lens is negligible.

People who say the difference between the two is negligible probably don't photograph in low available light. As long as there is enough light to keep ISO below 800-1600 you may not notice much if any difference. I will also add that what can be considered negligible varies from person to person.

In the end you must decide which is more valuable, the 70-200mm range or a stop to stop and a half extra noise and resultant decrease in detail and dynamic range at higher ISO.

A few years ago I made a similar decision when I decided the extra zoom of the RX10iii was more valuable to me than the faster lens in the RX10ii.

The RX100M6 has pretty good OSS: this is a handheld shot:

Treasury of Atreus, Mycenae, Greece. This tholos tomb from 1250BC had the world's highest, widest, unsupported domed roof for over a thousand years

That’s a beautiful shot and interesting caption too.

Amazingly, even after 3270 years, the tomb still sets the world record in another respect: it has the largest-ever lintel stone. And now we use concrete or steel, the record will presumably never be broken. More pics in:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157706650470381

Ah!  Fascinating!  I love learning this type of information.  Thanks.

-- hide signature --

Mary
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world . . ." Margaret Mead

 SeeTheWorld's gear list:SeeTheWorld's gear list
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John McCormack Veteran Member • Posts: 6,032
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI
3

For the past 55 years I've followed the mantra of Robert Capa, "If Your Pictures Aren't Good Enough, You're Not Close Enough."

For travel shooting I prefer a faster lens which equals faster shutter speeds and better low light performance. Rarely have the need for anything longer than 100mm - and 70mm is more than adequate. Just my two cents...

tbcass
tbcass Forum Pro • Posts: 41,749
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI
1

Digital Nigel wrote:

tbcass wrote:

My comment was about high ISO, not IS.

Surely it's obvious that the two are closely connected?

They are sometimes but I was talking about conditions that required high ISO while taking OSS into consideration. The fact that IS allows lower shutter speeds is a given with stationary subjects but if shooting moving subjects your shutter speed is determined by what is necessary to freeze action.

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Tom

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tbcass
tbcass Forum Pro • Posts: 41,749
Re: Sony RX100 VA vs VI

John McCormack wrote:

For the past 55 years I've followed the mantra of Robert Capa, "If Your Pictures Aren't Good Enough, You're Not Close Enough."

There is some truth in that but what is close enough with a 200mm + lens is not the same as the 100mm lens that you claim is long enough. The longer the lens the farther the distance that is close enough.

For travel shooting I prefer a faster lens which equals faster shutter speeds and better low light performance. Rarely have the need for anything longer than 100mm - and 70mm is more than adequate. Just my two cents...

I can think of many situations where 100mm will not allow you to get a good image. You obviously are restricting yourself to photographic opportunities where 100mm gets you close enough. To transfer that idea to other photographers is saying everybody should do the same type of photography that you do. 100mm would have resulted in a terrible image in this example that required 600mm.

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Tom

 tbcass's gear list:tbcass's gear list
Sony RX100 Sony RX10 IV Sony a99 II Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 Di Macro Sony DT 35mm F1.8 SAM +10 more
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