D800->Z7 or wait for next generation?

Started 7 months ago | Questions
JacquesC
JacquesC Veteran Member • Posts: 3,860
Reasonable expectations
1

Spare-time photog wrote:

.... I was already afraid of buying a f/1.8 lens after my mixed experiences with my 2.8 lenses wide open, although I originally wanted a f/1.4 lens. And the focus problem of both 85/1.8 lenses were visible using the center focus points. The next shootings will tell wether the problem is solved or persistent.

I just want to get rid of the DSLR's inherent possible AF problems, i.e. AFMA, that I experienced. That is my main expectation and my hope a Z7 has to fullfil. I don't want to care if my camera can handle a f/1.2 or not or if I have to better use only the centre AF fields, I just want to be confident in my camera and I want to concentrate in composing and in taking the picture, capture the moment and to become a better photographer, what is already hard enough.

A very reasonable expectation.

This is where I can offer my own observation and experience with my Z7 compared to D750/D800/D700 :

I found that the focus accuracy that I get with the Z7 with both 50 1.8G and 85 1.8G f-mount lenses is in a class of its own. Make no mistake, I got good and sharp images with these lenses on my DSLRs, but I had to focus tune them at specific apertures to be able to do so, and then the focus accuracy at (or near) those apertures were good. Eg., I focus tuned these lenses at f2.5 which gave me reasonable accuracy from f1.8 to f5.6.

With the Z7 I did not need any tuning whatsoever, I get very good results from f1.8 right up to f8, which is generally the smallest aperture I use. I suppose the reason for this is that the camera focusses using the chosen aperture and only stop down to f5.6 when the chosen aperture is smaller than f5.6.

Add the fact that these lenses are now also stabilised via IBIS and I suddenly get far more use out of my two primes.

I've never really been fond of using primes but now it's a different story, even to the point of where I consider getting one or two more!

This kind of difference between Z7 and D800 might just be important enough to make a difference to you as well.

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Jacques
apple-and-eve.com

Charly Diaz Azcue Regular Member • Posts: 111
Re: D800->Z7 or wait for next generation?
3

Alex Permit wrote:

Some quick thoughts:

I used to AF tune my lenses on my DSLR's. It was a frustrating experience. The optimal value would fluctuate with Focal length (on zoom lenses), with distance, it seemed to even fluctuate with temperature. I have found this is not the case with my Z7. Any fluctuation in tested "optimal" values seems to fluctuate around zero, and is just noise. If not having to deal with tuning lenses is important to you, I would say switch now.

On my D500 and D5 cameras, I used AF-C as my default focus mode. It just worked. On my Z7 I use AF-S as my default and use AF-C on a situtational basis. AF-S is rock solid and if your subjects are mostly static, I'd say go for it. If solid AF-C performance is really important to you, I would say wait for the next generation.

I have the same experience as Alex, using the D800 with the Nikon 35mm f/1.4 at 1.4 was a nightmare about AF calibration, since I got the Z6 I have tack sharp photos at f/1.4 without calibration.

Same thing about AF-S / AF-C, I use a D5 for work and bought the Z6 for personal proyects (street, portraits, etc) and I´m very pleased on how AF-S works.

Best Regards

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Leonard Shepherd
Leonard Shepherd Forum Pro • Posts: 17,772
Re: D800->Z7 or wait for next generation?
1

Charly Diaz Azcue wrote:

I have the same experience as Alex, using the D800 with the Nikon 35mm f/1.4 at 1.4 was a nightmare about AF calibration, since I got the Z6 I have tack sharp photos at f/1.4 without calibration.

Lots of us (and a very significant majority of the photographers I meet) have no difficulty getting good focus accuracy with DSLR phase detect over 97% of the time.

Whether it is because this majority appreciate phase detect is unlikely to be at its best with some types of subjects is a separate topic.

While ML largely removes phase detect AF from the equation, no amount of fine tune is likely to get ML to focus consistently well on a line parallel to the long dimension of the frameĀ 

Z bodies IMO can help get critical manual focus more accurate.

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Leonard Shepherd
In lots of ways good photography is much more about how equipment is used rather than the equipment being used.

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olyflyer
olyflyer Forum Pro • Posts: 26,670
Re: D800->Z7 or wait for next generation?
2

Leonard Shepherd wrote:

Charly Diaz Azcue wrote:

I have the same experience as Alex, using the D800 with the Nikon 35mm f/1.4 at 1.4 was a nightmare about AF calibration, since I got the Z6 I have tack sharp photos at f/1.4 without calibration.

Lots of us (and a very significant majority of the photographers I meet) have no difficulty getting good focus accuracy with DSLR phase detect over 97% of the time.

...but also 97% of the time,they don't use fast lenses wide open. There is no doubt that the Z7 is more accurate at f/1.4 compared to the D800, regardless which AF point is used or what the target is.

Whether it is because this majority appreciate phase detect is unlikely to be at its best with some types of subjects is a separate topic.

While ML largely removes phase detect AF from the equation, no amount of fine tune is likely to get ML to focus consistently well on a line parallel to the long dimension of the frame

That's true, but rarely a problem and is often easily solved.

Z bodies IMO can help get critical manual focus more accurate.

Definitely true as well.

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Nikon Z7
olyflyer
olyflyer Forum Pro • Posts: 26,670
Re: D800->Z7 or wait for next generation?
1

Charly Diaz Azcue wrote:

Alex Permit wrote:

Some quick thoughts:

I used to AF tune my lenses on my DSLR's. It was a frustrating experience. The optimal value would fluctuate with Focal length (on zoom lenses), with distance, it seemed to even fluctuate with temperature. I have found this is not the case with my Z7. Any fluctuation in tested "optimal" values seems to fluctuate around zero, and is just noise. If not having to deal with tuning lenses is important to you, I would say switch now.

On my D500 and D5 cameras, I used AF-C as my default focus mode. It just worked. On my Z7 I use AF-S as my default and use AF-C on a situtational basis. AF-S is rock solid and if your subjects are mostly static, I'd say go for it. If solid AF-C performance is really important to you, I would say wait for the next generation.

I have the same experience as Alex, using the D800 with the Nikon 35mm f/1.4 at 1.4 was a nightmare about AF calibration, since I got the Z6 I have tack sharp photos at f/1.4 without calibration.

Calibration only works for one distance, at least the type we users can do.

I agree that the Z is better wide open, also with the Z7 and the 50/1.4. A huge difference between the D800 and the Z7 in this regard.

Same thing about AF-S / AF-C, I use a D5 for work and bought the Z6 for personal proyects (street, portraits, etc) and I´m very pleased on how AF-S works.

Best Regards

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Nikon Z7
Laslo Varadi
Laslo Varadi Veteran Member • Posts: 5,428
Re: Happy with my D810 to Z7 jump

RumpelHund wrote:

z7: The combination of silent shooting, in-body-IS and on-chip-focussing makes it joy to shoot again on not too moving subjects. Would not bet on it for my dog running towards cam, here the D810 is better still.

Funny...

Th Z6/Z7 can do it.

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Laslo Varadi
Laslo Varadi Veteran Member • Posts: 5,428
Re: Happy with my D810 to Z7 jump

Spare-time photog wrote:

RumpelHund wrote:

Loving to shoot wide open (85/1.4, 24/1.4 and 200/2) I was massivly annoyed when I stepped from D700 to D800 and threw in another chunk of money for the D810.

To be honest, I didn't dare to buy the 85/1.4, instead I bought the 85/1.8, because I have not that much confidence in the D800 AF to manage that shallow DoF.

D700: no issues I ever realized

D800: AF on everything but eyes no matter what. AF plain unuasable in dark tungsten or even candle light.

Well, in my experience it is not that bad. Although the lighting conditions you describe are sometimes challenging. Often they lead to missfocued shoots, indeed.

D810: better than D800 but lots of misses on candle light or on backlight situations still, kept me frustrated

z7: The combination of silent shooting, in-body-IS and on-chip-focussing makes it joy to shoot again on not too moving subjects. Would not bet on it for my dog running towards cam, here the D810 is better still.

Running or walking? A walking model is hopefully covered by the AF system?

No problem at all with such subjects.

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OP Spare-time photog Junior Member • Posts: 39
Re: D800->Z7 or wait for next generation?
1

olyflyer wrote:

Charly Diaz Azcue wrote:

Alex Permit wrote:

Some quick thoughts:

I used to AF tune my lenses on my DSLR's. It was a frustrating experience. The optimal value would fluctuate with Focal length (on zoom lenses), with distance, it seemed to even fluctuate with temperature. I have found this is not the case with my Z7. Any fluctuation in tested "optimal" values seems to fluctuate around zero, and is just noise. If not having to deal with tuning lenses is important to you, I would say switch now.

On my D500 and D5 cameras, I used AF-C as my default focus mode. It just worked. On my Z7 I use AF-S as my default and use AF-C on a situtational basis. AF-S is rock solid and if your subjects are mostly static, I'd say go for it. If solid AF-C performance is really important to you, I would say wait for the next generation.

I have the same experience as Alex, using the D800 with the Nikon 35mm f/1.4 at 1.4 was a nightmare about AF calibration, since I got the Z6 I have tack sharp photos at f/1.4 without calibration.

Calibration only works for one distance, at least the type we users can do.

And to make things worse, for zoom lenses there is only one AFMA value. So I had troubles to tune my 24-70/2.8 which has more problems wide open in the 24-30mm range.

I agree that the Z is better wide open, also with the Z7 and the 50/1.4. A huge difference between the D800 and the Z7 in this regard.

Same thing about AF-S / AF-C, I use a D5 for work and bought the Z6 for personal proyects (street, portraits, etc) and I´m very pleased on how AF-S works.

Best Regards

 Spare-time photog's gear list:Spare-time photog's gear list
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jfriend00 Forum Pro • Posts: 12,545
Re: Happy with my D810 to Z7 jump

Laslo Varadi wrote:

RumpelHund wrote:

z7: The combination of silent shooting, in-body-IS and on-chip-focussing makes it joy to shoot again on not too moving subjects. Would not bet on it for my dog running towards cam, here the D810 is better still.

Funny...

Th Z6/Z7 can do it.

That's a pretty good Z6 image.  When examined at 100%, the DOF is pretty well centered between the front and back of the dog which is very good for a subject coming right at you.   Further, it's good for a dark colored subject without a ton of contrasting elements.  But, there does appear to be plenty of bright sunlight (judging by the shadow) so it isn't a particularly difficult set of circumstances to draw wide ranging conclusions from.

FYI, the EXIF gives us 1/1600, 220mm, ISO 800, but curiously does not give us the aperture.

Also, it's not fair to assume the Z7 has exactly the same capabilities as the Z6.  This is one place where the two may have different strengths/weaknesses due to the different size/qty of AF sensors.

Anyway, nice to see the Z6 nail this one.

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John

Veloster75 Contributing Member • Posts: 758
Re: D800->Z7 or wait for next generation?

Alex Permit wrote:

Some quick thoughts:

I used to AF tune my lenses on my DSLR's. It was a frustrating experience. The optimal value would fluctuate with Focal length (on zoom lenses), with distance, it seemed to even fluctuate with temperature. I have found this is not the case with my Z7. Any fluctuation in tested "optimal" values seems to fluctuate around zero, and is just noise. If not having to deal with tuning lenses is important to you, I would say switch now.

On my D500 and D5 cameras, I used AF-C as my default focus mode. It just worked. On my Z7 I use AF-S as my default and use AF-C on a situtational basis. AF-S is rock solid and if your subjects are mostly static, I'd say go for it. If solid AF-C performance is really important to you, I would say wait for the next generation.

Or at the very least see how the update pans out.

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A retired law enforcement officer now enjoying his lifelong love of photography full time.

 Veloster75's gear list:Veloster75's gear list
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Ira Blumberg Senior Member • Posts: 1,039
I made the D800 -> Z7 jump

For me it was a no-brainer. The D800 was a nice camera, but it was sufficiently large and heavy that I almost never took it out. Instead, I used a D7200 and a Fuji X-T2. Given that the D800 was gathering dust, it made sense for me to dump it while it still had some resale / trade-in value. In addition, I dumped the D7200. It was a fine DX camera, but the Z7 is still smaller, lighter and it provides about the same resolution in DX crop format as the D7200. Thus, for me the Z7 replaced 2 cameras.

In fact, the Z7 with the kit 24-70 lens is only a bit larger and heavier than the X-T2 with its (very nice) 18-55 kit lens. Now, whenever I travel or spend the day away from home, I almost always take the Z7 rather than the Fuji. The Fuji still wins if I mount the pancake 27mm lens as that combo is really small and light. If only Nikon or Sigma would make a pancake lens in the 30mm to 40mm range for the Z, then I might not need the Fuji at all.

Anyway, if you are still using the D800 and its size and weight are not slowing you down, you can likely afford to wait for the next Z camera and a few more native Z lenses. Otherwise, if the D800 met your shooting needs, but you want something smaller and lighter, I don't think you lose anything going with the Z7.

Good luck

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aniltulsi
aniltulsi Regular Member • Posts: 220
Wait...
5

I think you should wait. Next generation of Z cameras will surely be better than today's Z6/Z7s and if you can wait longer, the generation after will be even better than next generation ones, and next to next generation will be far far superior.

And imagine the camera ten generations later... Waiting is the best thing you can do...

JacquesC
JacquesC Veteran Member • Posts: 3,860
Much the same

Ira Blumberg wrote:

For me it was a no-brainer. The D800 was a nice camera, but it was sufficiently large and heavy that I almost never took it out. Instead, I used a D7200 and a Fuji X-T2. Given that the D800 was gathering dust, it made sense for me to dump it while it still had some resale / trade-in value. In addition, I dumped the D7200. It was a fine DX camera, but the Z7 is still smaller, lighter and it provides about the same resolution in DX crop format as the D7200. Thus, for me the Z7 replaced 2 cameras.

In fact, the Z7 with the kit 24-70 lens is only a bit larger and heavier than the X-T2 with its (very nice) 18-55 kit lens. Now, whenever I travel or spend the day away from home, I almost always take the Z7 rather than the Fuji. The Fuji still wins if I mount the pancake 27mm lens as that combo is really small and light. If only Nikon or Sigma would make a pancake lens in the 30mm to 40mm range for the Z, then I might not need the Fuji at all.

Anyway, if you are still using the D800 and its size and weight are not slowing you down, you can likely afford to wait for the next Z camera and a few more native Z lenses. Otherwise, if the D800 met your shooting needs, but you want something smaller and lighter, I don't think you lose anything going with the Z7.

Good luck

Much like you, I replaced two cameras (a D750 and a complete X-T2 system) with a Z7.

I also found the Z7 + 24-70S to be close in size to the X-T2 + 18-55, just a bit heavier. In any event, the Z7 + 24-70S is now my main kit and working very well for me. I kept a 50 1.8G and 85 1.8G (both work quite well on the Z) and will add the 14-30S when that becomes available.

My wife (who is very fond of her D800, and loves her 14-24 f2.8) is now eyeing my Z7 and I suspect that once she sees the diminutive size and weight of the Z7 + 14-30 compared to her D800 + 14-24 she is going to want a similar setup.

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Jacques
apple-and-eve.com

OP Spare-time photog Junior Member • Posts: 39
Re: Wait...

aniltulsi wrote:

I think you should wait. Next generation of Z cameras will surely be better than today's Z6/Z7s and if you can wait longer, the generation after will be even better than next generation ones, and next to next generation will be far far superior.

And imagine the camera ten generations later... Waiting is the best thing you can do...

I got your point and you are right. But for me it is not a matter of will the next gen. camera be better than this one. It is a matter of will this camera meet my main requirements, because every upgrade of gear means a loss of money.

 Spare-time photog's gear list:Spare-time photog's gear list
Nikon D800 Nikon Z7 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II Nikon 85mm F1.8G
Leonard Shepherd
Leonard Shepherd Forum Pro • Posts: 17,772
Re: Wait...
1

Spare-time photog wrote:

It is a matter of will this camera meet my main requirements,

Only you should make this decision

because every upgrade of gear means a loss of money.

It depends what you mean by "loss of money".

You get value from many things by using them. Depreciation due to wear and tear applies to most purchases.

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Leonard Shepherd
In lots of ways good photography is much more about how equipment is used rather than the equipment being used.

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Nikon D810 Nikon D7200 Nikon D500 Nikon D850 Nikon Z7 +25 more
shuncheung Contributing Member • Posts: 747
Re: Wait...
2

Spare-time photog wrote:

aniltulsi wrote:

I think you should wait. Next generation of Z cameras will surely be better than today's Z6/Z7s and if you can wait longer, the generation after will be even better than next generation ones, and next to next generation will be far far superior.

And imagine the camera ten generations later... Waiting is the best thing you can do...

I got your point and you are right. But for me it is not a matter of will the next gen. camera be better than this one. It is a matter of will this camera meet my main requirements, because every upgrade of gear means a loss of money.

First of all, I have a Z6 since as soon as it was available. As a 40+ year Nikon user, I am eager to gain experience on mirrorless cameras. Needless to say, I am not that young any more and would rather seize my opportunities.

The Z6 and Z7 are more like generation 1.5 cameras. They are the first Nikon FX mirrorless bodies, but Nikon does have plenty of experience making Nikon 1 mirrorless for 4, 5 years, although that product line wasn't very successful.

Being early generation cameras, the Z6 and Z7 still have some rough edges. Opinions may differ, but I think they are too small for comfortable holding and some dedicated buttons are missing, e.g. the two-button card format, dedicated metering mode button .... As much as I like XQD and find them reliable, I still prefer dual cards.

Only you can decide whether the Z7 meets your needs. I prefer not to invest that much into an early-generation product, hence the Z6. Generally speaking, if you can hang onto your D800 for another year or two, I would wait for a 2nd-gen product so that Nikon can iron out some of the more serious shortcomings.

Concerning loss of money, I am afraid that each one of us will eventually leave this world without taking any money with us. In that sense all of our money will be lost anyway, some day. I am not suggesting that one should go out and buy lots of camera gear and then starve, but if you can afford it, get it. Who knows when the day we lose all of our money anyway will come?

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Nikon D750 Nikon D500 Nikon D850 Nikon Z6 Nikon 500mm F5.6E PF +1 more
kanocto Regular Member • Posts: 199
Re: Much the same

JacquesC wrote:

Ira Blumberg wrote:

For me it was a no-brainer. The D800 was a nice camera, but it was sufficiently large and heavy that I almost never took it out. Instead, I used a D7200 and a Fuji X-T2. Given that the D800 was gathering dust, it made sense for me to dump it while it still had some resale / trade-in value. In addition, I dumped the D7200. It was a fine DX camera, but the Z7 is still smaller, lighter and it provides about the same resolution in DX crop format as the D7200. Thus, for me the Z7 replaced 2 cameras.

In fact, the Z7 with the kit 24-70 lens is only a bit larger and heavier than the X-T2 with its (very nice) 18-55 kit lens. Now, whenever I travel or spend the day away from home, I almost always take the Z7 rather than the Fuji. The Fuji still wins if I mount the pancake 27mm lens as that combo is really small and light. If only Nikon or Sigma would make a pancake lens in the 30mm to 40mm range for the Z, then I might not need the Fuji at all.

Anyway, if you are still using the D800 and its size and weight are not slowing you down, you can likely afford to wait for the next Z camera and a few more native Z lenses. Otherwise, if the D800 met your shooting needs, but you want something smaller and lighter, I don't think you lose anything going with the Z7.

Good luck

Much like you, I replaced two cameras (a D750 and a complete X-T2 system) with a Z7.

You have both now convinced me to go for z7. I just looked at xt3 and nice but you are right is not much smaller and I already have several Nikon lenses.

How long do I have to wait till some deal comes up? For around 1.1k Fujifilm has a great deal on kit plus prime but only for the xt30 which is too small for my hands!

I also found the Z7 + 24-70S to be close in size to the X-T2 + 18-55, just a bit heavier. In any event, the Z7 + 24-70S is now my main kit and working very well for me. I kept a 50 1.8G and 85 1.8G (both work quite well on the Z) and will add the 14-30S when that becomes available.

My wife (who is very fond of her D800, and loves her 14-24 f2.8) is now eyeing my Z7 and I suspect that once she sees the diminutive size and weight of the Z7 + 14-30 compared to her D800 + 14-24 she is going to want a similar setup.

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Jacques
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kek

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Laslo Varadi
Laslo Varadi Veteran Member • Posts: 5,428
Re: Happy with my D810 to Z7 jump

jfriend00 wrote:

Laslo Varadi wrote:

RumpelHund wrote:

z7: The combination of silent shooting, in-body-IS and on-chip-focussing makes it joy to shoot again on not too moving subjects. Would not bet on it for my dog running towards cam, here the D810 is better still.

Funny...

Th Z6/Z7 can do it.

That's a pretty good Z6 image. When examined at 100%, the DOF is pretty well centered between the front and back of the dog which is very good for a subject coming right at you. Further, it's good for a dark colored subject without a ton of contrasting elements. But, there does appear to be plenty of bright sunlight (judging by the shadow) so it isn't a particularly difficult set of circumstances to draw wide ranging conclusions from.

FYI, the EXIF gives us 1/1600, 220mm, ISO 800, but curiously does not give us the aperture.

Also, it's not fair to assume the Z7 has exactly the same capabilities as the Z6. This is one place where the two may have different strengths/weaknesses due to the different size/qty of AF sensors.

Anyway, nice to see the Z6 nail this one.

Hi John - Aperture was at F5.6.  I was testing out a new lens,  The Z6 CAN capture action.  The keeper rate is less % wise but you are shooting at faster frame rate than the DSLR.  If I know that I am going to shoot BIF or wildlife running around or even dog competitions I would choose my D850 and 70-200 F2.8 lens for shots such as this.  I was just testing/practicing.  My keeper % was about 65% with the Z and about 85% with the D850.

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olyflyer
olyflyer Forum Pro • Posts: 26,670
Re: D800->Z7 or wait for next generation?

Spare-time photog wrote:

olyflyer wrote:

Charly Diaz Azcue wrote:

Alex Permit wrote:

Some quick thoughts:

I used to AF tune my lenses on my DSLR's. It was a frustrating experience. The optimal value would fluctuate with Focal length (on zoom lenses), with distance, it seemed to even fluctuate with temperature. I have found this is not the case with my Z7. Any fluctuation in tested "optimal" values seems to fluctuate around zero, and is just noise. If not having to deal with tuning lenses is important to you, I would say switch now.

On my D500 and D5 cameras, I used AF-C as my default focus mode. It just worked. On my Z7 I use AF-S as my default and use AF-C on a situtational basis. AF-S is rock solid and if your subjects are mostly static, I'd say go for it. If solid AF-C performance is really important to you, I would say wait for the next generation.

I have the same experience as Alex, using the D800 with the Nikon 35mm f/1.4 at 1.4 was a nightmare about AF calibration, since I got the Z6 I have tack sharp photos at f/1.4 without calibration.

Calibration only works for one distance, at least the type we users can do.

And to make things worse, for zoom lenses there is only one AFMA value. So I had troubles to tune my 24-70/2.8 which has more problems wide open in the 24-30mm range.

Yes, zooms are totally hopeless. In fact, even Nikon says that you should be aware of the side effects of focus tuning, you can make a lens better at a certain focal length and distance but the same tuning can make the lens worse at other focal lengths and distances, so they recommend you to send in the lens, in some cases together with the camera, for a proper focus adjustment.

In any case, the Z7 is a bless when it comes to fast lenses. I don't have any fast zooms, only primes, but they definitely work better on the Z7 in my opinion, and that's probably the case also with fast zooms.

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Nikon Z7
olyflyer
olyflyer Forum Pro • Posts: 26,670
Re: Much the same

kanocto wrote:

JacquesC wrote:

Ira Blumberg wrote:

For me it was a no-brainer. The D800 was a nice camera, but it was sufficiently large and heavy that I almost never took it out. Instead, I used a D7200 and a Fuji X-T2. Given that the D800 was gathering dust, it made sense for me to dump it while it still had some resale / trade-in value. In addition, I dumped the D7200. It was a fine DX camera, but the Z7 is still smaller, lighter and it provides about the same resolution in DX crop format as the D7200. Thus, for me the Z7 replaced 2 cameras.

In fact, the Z7 with the kit 24-70 lens is only a bit larger and heavier than the X-T2 with its (very nice) 18-55 kit lens. Now, whenever I travel or spend the day away from home, I almost always take the Z7 rather than the Fuji. The Fuji still wins if I mount the pancake 27mm lens as that combo is really small and light. If only Nikon or Sigma would make a pancake lens in the 30mm to 40mm range for the Z, then I might not need the Fuji at all.

Anyway, if you are still using the D800 and its size and weight are not slowing you down, you can likely afford to wait for the next Z camera and a few more native Z lenses. Otherwise, if the D800 met your shooting needs, but you want something smaller and lighter, I don't think you lose anything going with the Z7.

Good luck

Much like you, I replaced two cameras (a D750 and a complete X-T2 system) with a Z7.

You have both now convinced me to go for z7. I just looked at xt3 and nice but you are right is not much smaller and I already have several Nikon lenses.

I have also had my eyes on Fuji before buying the Z7, but went for the Z7 because it's FF and because it isn't much larger, and also because I already had the lenses and flashes I wanted to have. With Fuji it would have meant a total restart, dumping everything and buying something I had zero experience with as a system. So my real choce was between the D850 and the Z7, and the D850 lost because of weight, size and because the DSLRs are NOT the future.

How long do I have to wait till some deal comes up?

No one can answer that... It also depends on where you live...

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Nikon Z7
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