Sony’s RX100M3: A Good Purchase in 2019?

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BrentSchumer
BrentSchumer Regular Member • Posts: 495
Sony’s RX100M3: A Good Purchase in 2019?
4

Sony’s RX100M3: A Good Purchase in 2019?

Sony’s RX100 line of cameras have been a pocket stalwart since their inception in 2012. Through six and a half revisions they have steadily accrued handy features like an electronic viewfinder and neutral density filter, packing the punch of a DSLR into a device that fits into the palm of your hand. Yet despite these refinements, even the best compact cameras have seen their market segment eroded by the proliferation and evolution of smartphone cameras, which now come replete with multiple lenses and AI post-processing. With the RX100M3 back up to $750 USD, is this 2014 device relevant in 2019?

For this review, I will be sharing my impressions, thoughts, and like-for-like samples from my RX100M3 and Google Pixel 2. While this smartphone is over a year old (ancient tech), it was the flagship of its day and includes a fairly mature version of Google’s camera magic. To evaluate the device as both a “pocket DSLR” and point-and-shoot, I tried to capture scenes with manual mode in RAW files and as “out-of-camera” (OOC) JPGs using the camera’s automatic mode. The camera’s software zoom may have been used to create similar compositions, as that is how I use the device. I’m also going to review this camera from two primary perspectives: as a smartphone upgrade and as a smaller dedicated camera.

The RX100M3 introduced revolutionary features for its time that are still useful today. The pop-up EVF is invaluable for taking pictures in the sun and composing carefully. A built-in ND filter allows you to capture bright vistas without lugging around an adapter and ND filters - an uncompromised portable experience. The articulating rear LCD allows you to get high and low shots that are near-impossible with a fixed-screen compact or smartphone, such as shooting a performer above the heads of the crowd. Stabilization saves shots from hand tremors. A 24-70mm focal length lets you frame closer images without heavy cropping (which was the smartphone annoyance that triggered my RX100 purchase in the first place). All of this is offered in a well-built camera that fits tightly in a pants pocket or easily in a jacket pocket.

Yet my Pixel 2 is no slouch. Not only is it a much slimmer package than my RX100, but most of its surface is filled with a gorgeous touchscreen. This allows for lightning-fast, intuitive composition. I probably wouldn’t bother trying to capture a fleeting event on my RX100 (fish it out, wait for it to extend, adjust the manual controls, frame, shoot), but my Pixel 2 is always at the ready and quickly turns ideas into images. More importantly, Google has spent millions of dollars developing post-processing AI that transforms every casual snapshot into a hyper-advanced composite of images, all with zero time in front of a keyboard and mouse. Images from my Pixel 2 pop with HDR+ and expertly-tweaked filters that I don’t have the skill to apply in post-processing, all without a thought. It’s common these days for a smartphone user that picks up a DSLR to be disappointed with their initial images, because they are used to seeing hours of exact post-processing in every picture.

[b]Handling[/b]

For someone coming from another Sony camera, the RX100 is a fairly straight-forward proposition. The buttons can be tweaked to ensure all of your common exposure parameters a press away. With a center focus point or manual focus (assisted by focus peaking), I can rapidly set up an image and capture the exposure that I am looking for. On the other hand, Sony’s lack of touchscreen on a product sold in 2019 makes focus point movement an excruciating affair and major annoyance for anyone used to thumbing a joystick or stroking a finger across a rear LCD. This is offset by having an EVF and tilt LCD available for your composing needs, making this camera more versatile than peers with a single fixed screen. The Sony menus allow for tweaking nearly everything but are laid out seemingly at random and should be avoided. Luckily, most functions can be mapped to a rear button or the twelve-item function menu, meaning that I only access the main menus to change time zones or format my SD card. If you’re coming from a smartphone, you’re going to wonder if Sony is performing experiments to measure your patience. I myself bought a reasonably thick book to explain the RX100M3’s myriad options, which is probably some sort of red flag. You can leave all the decisions up to scene automatic mode, but the decisions that it makes often result in blurred photos, grainy photos, and other artifacts of poor trade-offs. To get the most out of your RX100M3, you need to climb a learning curve and take the helm.

The Pixel 2 is a polar opposite of the RX100. Focus point selection is instant with each tap, and the few options available are all a swipe or touch away. The camera decides how to set up each exposure, meaning that you’re free to focus on composition and your surroundings. I rarely find myself disagreeing with the choices of Google’s AI, with failed shots coming from the limitations of the phone sensor instead of some trade-off between ISO and shutter speed.

If you’re looking to define the parameters of each exposure, the RX100M3 gives you control that cannot be replicated with Google’s offering. If you want to point-and-shoot your way to captured memories, the Pixel 2 is a much more intuitive device. While it lacks some of the goodies that make for better edge-case composition (such as a tilt screen) the baseline camera experience is completely intuitive and instantly responsive. I prefer taking pictures with my RX100 but have to give the nod for handling to Google’s past flagship.

[b]Video[/b]

What’s video? Let’s talk still images!

[b]The Pictures[/b]

Because these two devices differ so much in how they take pictures I’m going to type less and show more.

RX100M3; full auto; OOC JPG

Pixel 2

These first two images of New York's iconic Upper West side are surprisingly close in detail without pixel peeping (no, that's not a pun). The RX100 OOC JPG appears more vibrant, likely due to the built-in ND filter.

When you zoom in, you see why I wasn't happy with the limited focal length of a smartphone:

RX100M3; full auto; OOC JPG

RX100M3; manual exposure; light post-processing of RAW file

Pixel 2

While the Pixel 2 struggles valiantly, a digital zoom will always be inferior to the optical variety. You can see that the Sony OOC JPG is rather subdued, a problem that I find very common with this camera.

Next up is a tree in Central Park:

RX100M3; manual exposure; light post-processing of RAW file

RX100M3; manual exposure; OOC JPG

RX100M3; full auto; OOC JPG

Pixel 2

Again, without pixel peeping I find the Pixel 2 image sufficiently detailed and pleasing to the eye. Zoom in to 100% to see how much more detail is in that RX100 image, if you choose to crop. Also note how lifeless the OOC of my manual exposure was. Without post-processing, I would prefer the Pixel 2 output.

One final outdoor shot, teasing the Temple of Dendur chamber at the Met:

RX100M3; manual exposure; light post-processing of RAW file

RX100M3; manual exposure; OOC JPG

RX100M3; full auto; OOC JPG

Pixel 2

The RX100M3 is a clear winner here. Note that the RAW file appears over-saturated but I did not adjust saturation or color at all.

Today the Met greeted me with a sumptuous bouquet!

RX100M3; manual exposure; light post-processing of RAW file

RX100M3; manual exposure; OOC JPG

 BrentSchumer's gear list:BrentSchumer's gear list
Sony RX100 III Sony a6400 Sony E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS Sony E 35mm F1.8 OSS Sony E 50mm F1.8 OSS +1 more
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III
20 megapixels • 3 screen • 24 – 70 mm (2.9×)
Announced: May 16, 2014
BrentSchumer's score
3.5
Average community score
3.9
bad for good for
Kids / pets
weak
Action / sports
bad
Landscapes / scenery
great
Portraits
okay
Low light (without flash)
weak
Flash photography (social)
okay
Studio / still life
great
= community average
Google Pixel 2
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 8,198
Re: Sony’s RX100M3: A Good Purchase in 2019?
1

Thanks, it's interesting to see a fair comparison between a high end smartphone and a good quality compact camera, from someone without an axe to grind.

What frustrates me with Sony is its failure to take advantage of the rapid advances in computational photography. Sony knows a lot about phone cameras, and I wish it would combine some of that magic with the superior optics and larger sensor size of a separate camera. What little computational photography the RX cameras include hasn't really progressed since the first NEX cameras in 2010.

The latest RX cameras do include a touch screen, but its contribution to the UI is minimal. And, as you mention, the learning curve is absurdly long and steep. Sony did dabble with in-camera apps, but made them horribly difficult to download, and unbelievably clunky in operation. The feature has been dropped altogether in the latest models. There is also a lack of a high function phone app to control, customise and operate RX cameras.

Sony doesn't seem to grasp that it must appeal to both elderly, long-time camera users (like many members of this forum), who have misty memories of their completely manual film cameras and dark rooms from 50 years ago, and a younger generation who love their smartphones, but realise that they sometimes need a better camera.

 Digital Nigel's gear list:Digital Nigel's gear list
Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Panasonic ZS100 Nikon Coolpix P900 Sony RX10 III +15 more
BrentSchumer
OP BrentSchumer Regular Member • Posts: 495
Review Part 2
2

(Continuing the review here, as I ran into issues with the original post.)

The RX100 is much more pleasing than the Pixel 2 for this scene, though it takes post-processing to bring out the potential of the camera.

Here is another lobby shot:

RX100M3; manual exposure; light post-processing of RAW file

RX100M3; manual exposure; OOC JPG

RX100M3; full auto; OOC JPG

Pixel 2

The manual RX100 and Pixel 2 shots are comparable, but Sony's "intelligent auto" really made odd choices, here. For this static statue the camera increased the shutter speed to 1/250s and then compensated with ISO4000. The mind boggles. Shots like this have led me to not recommend the RX100 as a point-and-shoot camera. You'll see a much worse example below.

Half a face; half a comparison:

RX100M3; full auto; OOC JPG

Pixel 2

For this statue, I screwed up my manual exposure with a twitch of the arm and will be pitting OOC vs. OOC. Side by side I prefer Google's colors and the RX100M3 background blur and greater detail. Note that I tried to take a portrait mode shot of the same statue and Google's AI really messed up:

Pixel 2; portrait mode

Yet another statue:

RX100M3; manual exposure; light post-processing of RAW file

RX100M3; manual exposure; OOC JPG

RX100; full auto; OOC JPG

Pixel 2

I find the RX100 shots to be more natural. Note that the Pixel 2's portrait mode again failed to create a realistic image.

Let's enter tribal ritual combat, OOC vs OOC:

RX100; full auto; OOC JPG

Pixel 2

This is why point-and-shoots are dying. The Pixel 2 managed to capture just as much detail while handling the dynamic range better. I'm sure I could have elicited a slightly better shot from RAW, but the Pixel 2 hit the mark without any muss or fuss.

Next up is a European period bedroom, with a challenging contrast of shadow and light:

RX100; manual exposure; light post-processing of RAW file

RX100; manual exposure; OOC JPG

RX100

Pixel 2

Again the RX100M3 fails in auto mode, deciding that this dark room should be ISO 160 and 0.5s shutter speed, resulting in a blurry mess. The Pixel 2 and RX100 manual exposures trade blows (Pixel 2 better captured the chandelier; RX100 caught more detail in dark areas). The manual shot OOC was pretty good but skewed a bit green.

Next up: Stained Glass

RX100; manual exposure; light post-processing of RAW file

RX100; manual exposure; OOC JPG

RX100; full auto; OOC JPG

Pixel 2

For some reason Capture One Pro seems to be butchering this RAW file on export, killing the detail. The "true" RAW is better than the Pixel 2 which handles highlights better than the OOC JPG.

Bronze archer:

RX100; manual exposure; light post-processing of RAW file

RX100; manual exposure; OOC JPG

RX100; full auto; OOC JPG

Pixel 2

RX100 comes out on top here, mostly due to the downsides of "zoom" on the Pixel 2. Note that the full auto again misreads the exposure.

Finally, my favorite place in New York - the Temple of Dendur:

RX100; manual exposure; light post-processing of RAW file

RX100; manual exposure; OOC JPG

Pixel 2

Here, I completely overexposed my manual shot. The RX100 full auto did a bit better, but its colors were alien and drab. The Pixel 2 took the most pleasant picture!

As a Travel Camera

After traveling with just a flagship smartphone and with the RX100M3, I really prefer the latter. A bit of optical zoom is huge for framing shots when crowds or barriers keep you away from your subject, and I find that I get in the mindset for pictures better with a dedicated device. While the RX100 either bulges in your shorts pocket or requires a holster, I still find it natural enough to carry with me for an entire day. You will need spare batteries to take pictures across an entire day trip, but spares are small and easy to charge with Sony's travel adapter. You can also charge from a phone battery bank, killing two birds with one stone. Still, for $750 a photographer should think long and hard about alternatives with larger sensors (e.g. LX100) or much longer zoom (e.g. ZS200).

Japan

Kids/Pets

This camera can be used to take pictures of human and animal critters, but the small sensor, older AF system, and lack of touchscreen make this a sub-optimal device for this kind of use.

Holly

Landscapes/scenery

This camera - replete with ND filter - was made for landscape shots. While 24mm equivalent might be a bit tight for some shooters, this is quite a nice landscape shooter given its portability.

Mount Fuji

Portraits

3X zoom gives you a bit of background blur to play with for impromptu portraits, but a 1" sensor will never excel for portrait work. If you want to squeeze portraits into a tiny form factor you might want to look at a camera with a longer zoom like the RX100M6 or ZS100.

Low light (without flash)

Unless you fiddle around with HDR, this camera does struggle in low light.

Tokyo

Flash Photography (social)

The built in flash on this camera is okay, given that you can bounce it. But the camera lacks a hotshoe and other external flash accoutrements.

Studio / still life

For its size, this camera can take quite nice still life photos.

Conclusion

My recommendation for or against purchasing an RX100M3 in 2019 varies depending on the user and their goals.

For flagship cameraphone users that are looking for more detail and a bit of zoom, this Sony ultraportable is a questionable proposition. Out-of-camera JPEGs from the Sony will lack the advanced post-processing of Apple and Google's best offerings, and this camera really requires RAW shooting and post-processing to shine. You also need a good handle on exposure to get the best from this camera, as the Sony auto modes do not customize settings with the intelligence of a human mind. Lastly, shipping a compact camera without a touchscreen puts this device as a severe disadvantage when everything from a thermostat to a car can be operated with a tap. The RX100M3 is a cameraphone upgrade in some circumstances but one that requires significant learning and effort. $750 is too much to ask for this incremental upgrade.

For someone used to interchangeable-lens cameras who wants it all in a tiny package, the RX100M3 is a great proposition. You get the essentials of a much bulkier camera - including an EVF, tilt-screen, and ND filter - in a package that slips into a jacket pocket or purse with ease. Proficiency with manual exposure settings and post-processing can yield excellent results that hold up well to much larger cameras. Handling issues remain - particularly moving the focus point and reliance on one dial for manual mode aperture and shutter speed - but I don't find these to be deal-breakers. This RX100 has less focal length to play with than its youngest sibling or competitors from Panasonic, which should be taken into consideration before you leave your DSLR in the hotel room. Feature or size compromises allow you to pick up a much larger sensor and more refined controls from competitors, so I would recommend handling various options in this price range before you settle with the RX100M3.  Still, there is a reason why the RX100 line is an enthusiast's go-to in the ultraportable space.

 BrentSchumer's gear list:BrentSchumer's gear list
Sony RX100 III Sony a6400 Sony E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS Sony E 35mm F1.8 OSS Sony E 50mm F1.8 OSS +1 more
BrentSchumer
OP BrentSchumer Regular Member • Posts: 495
Re: Sony’s RX100M3: A Good Purchase in 2019?

Digital Nigel wrote:

Thanks, it's interesting to see a fair comparison between a high end smartphone and a good quality compact camera, from someone without an axe to grind.

What frustrates me with Sony is its failure to take advantage of the rapid advances in computational photography. Sony knows a lot about phone cameras, and I wish it would combine some of that magic with the superior optics and larger sensor size of a separate camera. What little computational photography the RX cameras include hasn't really progressed since the first NEX cameras in 2010.

The latest RX cameras do include a touch screen, but its contribution to the UI is minimal. And, as you mention, the learning curve is absurdly long and steep. Sony did dabble with in-camera apps, but made them horribly difficult to download, and unbelievably clunky in operation. The feature has been dropped altogether in the latest models. There is also a lack of a high function phone app to control, customise and operate RX cameras.

Sony doesn't seem to grasp that it must appeal to both elderly, long-time camera users (like many members of this forum), who have misty memories of their completely manual film cameras and dark rooms from 50 years ago, and a younger generation who love their smartphones, but realise that they sometimes need a better camera.

Don't forget to read part 2!

Computational photography is on Sony's mind (see the recent interview linked in the crop E mount forum), but they lack Google's software expertise and computing-centric devices.  I fully expect that a smartphone-class processor and AI post-processing will eventually make their way to dedicated cameras, ushering in a new era of quality and ease of operation.  Unfortunately, we're not there yet, and quality software seems to be the Achilles heel of camera makers.

Other parts of the RX100 line really are hopelessly dated, even compared to camera peers.  The lack of a touchscreen in 2019 on $500+ devices is bizarre, and Sony really should refresh the RX100VA and at least one cheaper model with this functionality posthaste.

 BrentSchumer's gear list:BrentSchumer's gear list
Sony RX100 III Sony a6400 Sony E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS Sony E 35mm F1.8 OSS Sony E 50mm F1.8 OSS +1 more
Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 8,198
Re: Sony’s RX100M3: A Good Purchase in 2019?

BrentSchumer wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

Thanks, it's interesting to see a fair comparison between a high end smartphone and a good quality compact camera, from someone without an axe to grind.

What frustrates me with Sony is its failure to take advantage of the rapid advances in computational photography. Sony knows a lot about phone cameras, and I wish it would combine some of that magic with the superior optics and larger sensor size of a separate camera. What little computational photography the RX cameras include hasn't really progressed since the first NEX cameras in 2010.

The latest RX cameras do include a touch screen, but its contribution to the UI is minimal. And, as you mention, the learning curve is absurdly long and steep. Sony did dabble with in-camera apps, but made them horribly difficult to download, and unbelievably clunky in operation. The feature has been dropped altogether in the latest models. There is also a lack of a high function phone app to control, customise and operate RX cameras.

Sony doesn't seem to grasp that it must appeal to both elderly, long-time camera users (like many members of this forum), who have misty memories of their completely manual film cameras and dark rooms from 50 years ago, and a younger generation who love their smartphones, but realise that they sometimes need a better camera.

Don't forget to read part 2!

Yes, thanks, I've now read it. It confirms my belief that the RX100 is a miniaturised big camera, not a P&S compact. And that's how I use mine: I never use the auto modes, only shoot raw, and post-process every keeper image (ie, I don't just batch convert raw to JPEG).

Computational photography is on Sony's mind (see the recent interview linked in the crop E mount forum), but they lack Google's software expertise and computing-centric devices.

Yup. But as Sony also makes camera phone sensors and cameras, and its own smartphones, it should have a big advantage over pure camera makers.

I fully expect that a smartphone-class processor and AI post-processing will eventually make their way to dedicated cameras, ushering in a new era of quality and ease of operation. Unfortunately, we're not there yet, and quality software seems to be the Achilles heel of camera makers.

Yes, again, but they should be giving it a much higher priority.

Other parts of the RX100 line really are hopelessly dated, even compared to camera peers. The lack of a touchscreen in 2019 on $500+ devices is bizarre, and Sony really should refresh the RX100VA and at least one cheaper model with this functionality posthaste.

Sony's policy has been not to refresh the older models that are still on sale. If you buy an RX100M1 today, it's exactly the same camera that I bought in 2012.

And even the latest models' touchscreens are unbelievably crippled compared to any smartphone or, say, Canon or Panasonic cameras. About the only function is to select the focus point. You can't navigate the menus. You can't zoom. You can't swipe.

 Digital Nigel's gear list:Digital Nigel's gear list
Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Panasonic ZS100 Nikon Coolpix P900 Sony RX10 III +15 more
AdamT
AdamT Forum Pro • Posts: 58,944
Well I got one ----->
1

Well I got one .. in the UK the Mk3 is the sweet spot of the RX100 range for price to performance ratio - it has the good stuff - The BSI sensor, the pop up EVF, tilt screen  and that lovely fast lens

What its missing compared to the Mk4 and 5 /5A, for me at least are totally irrelevant , I don`t need 4K video, or a frame rate which will shame a Nikon D500 in a Shirt pocket camera - in fact I don`t need them at all full stop but in a cam which only goes to 70mm , has no mic  jack or touch screen even less so . so the Mk3 is bang on target for me

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** Please ignore the Typos, I'm the world's worst Typist **

 AdamT's gear list:AdamT's gear list
Canon PowerShot G1 X Sony RX100 III Sony RX10 III Fujifilm X-T100
BrentSchumer
OP BrentSchumer Regular Member • Posts: 495
Re: Well I got one ----->

I'm glad it's a good fit for you and certainly enjoy my camera.  Still, it would be nice to see some of the latest UI and handling refinements in a cheaper RX100 (touch, new menus, and half a decade of little improvements).

 BrentSchumer's gear list:BrentSchumer's gear list
Sony RX100 III Sony a6400 Sony E 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS Sony E 35mm F1.8 OSS Sony E 50mm F1.8 OSS +1 more
Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 8,198
Re: Well I got one ----->

BrentSchumer wrote:

I'm glad it's a good fit for you and certainly enjoy my camera. Still, it would be nice to see some of the latest UI and handling refinements in a cheaper RX100 (touch, new menus, and half a decade of little improvements).

Panasonic has just done something very much like that, with the belated FZ1000 Mk 2.

 Digital Nigel's gear list:Digital Nigel's gear list
Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Panasonic ZS100 Nikon Coolpix P900 Sony RX10 III +15 more
telefunk
telefunk Senior Member • Posts: 2,252
Re: Well I got one ----->
1

AdamT wrote:

Well I got one .. in the UK the Mk3 is the sweet spot of the RX100 range for price to performance ratio - it has the good stuff - The BSI sensor, the pop up EVF, tilt screen and that lovely fast lens

What its missing compared to the Mk4 and 5 /5A, for me at least are totally irrelevant , I don`t need 4K video, or a frame rate which will shame a Nikon D500 in a Shirt pocket camera - in fact I don`t need them at all full stop but in a cam which only goes to 70mm , has no mic jack or touch screen even less so . so the Mk3 is bang on target for me

Missing is reliable focussing @ the long end. This will fail even in daylight. That said the RX100III pretty much surpasses any M43 out there in IQ.

The newer versions apparently have better AF.

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AdamT
AdamT Forum Pro • Posts: 58,944
Re: Well I got one ----->

Missing is reliable focussing @ the long end. This will fail even in daylight. That said the RX100III pretty much surpasses any M43 out there in IQ.

The newer versions apparently have better AF.

those oddball random AF misses don`t seem to have gone, a user reported such issues with an RX10-IV which has the latest AF . I find the RX100-III is more stable than any Olympus M43 I`ve owned for random hit and miss focussing (though admittedly the newest was an EM5 Mk2, the EM1 Mk1 loved to rear focus ) - I stuck with Panasonic after that , the AF is solid .. With the RXs (10 and 100, both Mk3s) I get the occasional AF miss, I always take a few to bracket focus anyway and it`s fast to check , just flick the zoom lever after taking a shot

I was amazed at the RAW DR and high ISO performance of these sensors for their tiny size compared to M43 - DR is up there with the best and high ISO noise performance isn`t far behind the still current 16Mp bodies such as the GX80, G80, EM10-III EM5-II etc .. (only the state of the art 20Mp EM1-II sensor beats it significantly , the ones in the GX8 & Pen-F certainly don't )

what I an finding is that the noise floor is lower than the M43 stuff I`ve had , certainly the ones with panasonic sensors ,, I`m getting cleaner skies and cleaner pulled shadows because the BSI 1" sensor doesn`t lose any Dynamic range when set to Pulled ISOs usch as ISO80 (on the 100-III) whereas the Pan M43 sensors Do so you have ot stick to ISO200 . as a consequence I`m wondering why ISO80 is described as a pulled ISO on the 1" BSI ? , even DXO show that it has more DR than ISO160. the official base

These are my findings anyway - YMMV

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Canon PowerShot G1 X Sony RX100 III Sony RX10 III Fujifilm X-T100
Isola Verde
Isola Verde Veteran Member • Posts: 9,087
Re: Well I got one ----->

Sorry, it's now quite late here, but what the heck is this para meant to mean?

what I an finding is that the noise floor is lower than the M43 stuff I`ve had , certainly the ones with panasonic sensors ,, I`m getting cleaner skies and cleaner pulled shadows because the BSI 1" sensor doesn`t lose any Dynamic range when set to Pulled ISOs usch as ISO80 (on the 100-III) whereas the Pan M43 sensors Do so you have ot stick to ISO200 . as a consequence I`m wondering why ISO80 is described as a pulled ISO on the 1" BSI ? , even DXO show that it has more DR than ISO160. the official base

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AdamT
AdamT Forum Pro • Posts: 58,944
Re: Well I got one ----->
1

The lower the base iso the less sky noise there is  the BSI 1” sensors don’t seem to lose dynamic range at the sub-ISO’s of 64 80 and 100 so you can use them all the time and get cleaner skies and shadows

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Isola Verde
Isola Verde Veteran Member • Posts: 9,087
Re: Well I got one ----->

AdamT wrote:

The lower the base iso the less sky noise there is the BSI 1” sensors don’t seem to lose dynamic range at the sub-ISO’s of 64 80 and 100 so you can use them all the time and get cleaner skies and shadows

Thanks, got it now!

Peter

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Smallpox
Smallpox Regular Member • Posts: 225
Re: Well I got one ----->

AdamT wrote:

Missing is reliable focussing @ the long end. This will fail even in daylight. That said the RX100III pretty much surpasses any M43 out there in IQ.

The newer versions apparently have better AF.

those oddball random AF misses don`t seem to have gone, a user reported such issues with an RX10-IV which has the latest AF . I find the RX100-III is more stable than any Olympus M43 I`ve owned for random hit and miss focussing (though admittedly the newest was an EM5 Mk2, the EM1 Mk1 loved to rear focus ) - I stuck with Panasonic after that , the AF is solid .. With the RXs (10 and 100, both Mk3s) I get the occasional AF miss, I always take a few to bracket focus anyway and it`s fast to check , just flick the zoom lever after taking a shot

I was amazed at the RAW DR and high ISO performance of these sensors for their tiny size compared to M43 - DR is up there with the best and high ISO noise performance isn`t far behind the still current 16Mp bodies such as the GX80, G80, EM10-III EM5-II etc .. (only the state of the art 20Mp EM1-II sensor beats it significantly , the ones in the GX8 & Pen-F certainly don't )

what I an finding is that the noise floor is lower than the M43 stuff I`ve had , certainly the ones with panasonic sensors ,, I`m getting cleaner skies and cleaner pulled shadows because the BSI 1" sensor doesn`t lose any Dynamic range when set to Pulled ISOs usch as ISO80 (on the 100-III) whereas the Pan M43 sensors Do so you have ot stick to ISO200 . as a consequence I`m wondering why ISO80 is described as a pulled ISO on the 1" BSI ? , even DXO show that it has more DR than ISO160. the official base

These are my findings anyway - YMMV

You are correct. Strange that people still hang onto old certainties... (bigger sensor = better)

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Only drummers can travel in time

Kenny123 Forum Member • Posts: 89
Re: Well I got one ----->
1

Until recently losing my RX100iii I found it to be great for my needs. I'm unsure however whether to get the same again or get a more recent model such as the VA. Threads such as this are therefore of interest.

One issue that did frustrate me on the iii was the lack of ability to set a minimum shutter speed on the aperture setting causing blurred photos as the default to 1/30 second was often to slow for me. I believe the model iv onward allows a minimum shutter speed to be set which is useful and something to consider.

66GTO Veteran Member • Posts: 3,096
Re: Sony’s RX100M3: A Good Purchase in 2019?

They are still selling the original version, and I know someone who bought one a week ago and is happy with it. So for the right person an M3 ought to still be a good purchase for some people as well.

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Crazy old man! Slow down. You are way too old to be
hunting hemi's in that 66GTO.

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Canon PowerShot G1 X Sony RX100 Sony Cyber-shot DSC-R1 Nikon Df +1 more
aerorail Contributing Member • Posts: 838
sure

as long as you dont shoot high contrast scenes in various auto settings its a good camera.

also has issues if reds are the predominate subject in scene and usually a bit magenta tint in shadows.

architectural distortion (maybe my shooting at the time)

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Sony RX100 III
Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 8,198
Re: sure

aerorail wrote:

as long as you dont shoot high contrast scenes in various auto settings its a good camera.

also has issues if reds are the predominate subject in scene and usually a bit magenta tint in shadows.

architectural distortion (maybe my shooting at the time)

Yes, that has nothing to do with the camera or lens distortion. It comes from not keeping the camera absolutely level. Not doing so leads to keystone distortion, easily fixed in post, eg with DxO Viewpoint.

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Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Panasonic ZS100 Nikon Coolpix P900 Sony RX10 III +15 more
mark power Forum Member • Posts: 59
Re: Sony’s RX100M3: A Good Purchase in 2019?

Recently I had my say about smartphone cameras on Mike Johnston's excellent site, The Online Photographer. What I forgot to mention was my use of the RX100 which exactly mirrors your experience. I used both 1 and 2 versions of the the RX100 for about two years as my main camera and liked all the features you mentioned. But then along came the Pixel2 and sadly both those excellent little cameras are now on the shelf. I offered them to my children but they seem to also prefer their smartphone cameras. Back in the days of film, the closest thing to a RX100 was the Rollei 35mm camera, a little jewel which you could fit in your pocket. I remember the excitement that camera caused, myself and all my friends had one. But compared to a RX100 or a smartphone it was like driving a model T Ford.

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Panasonic LX100 Sony a7 II Google Pixel 3
Michael Fritzen Veteran Member • Posts: 5,819
Re: Sony’s RX100M3: A Good Purchase in 2019?

It's quite interesting to read yor review and compare mentally to one's own experiences.

From the handling POV I've noticed that you seem to have made the diametral opposite tactile experience than I have: owning since 2012 shortly after introduction a RX100 Mk1 this cam fits nice and easily in my hands and I never felt it necessary to add one of those grips. Perhaps the only downside on this specific cam is that it offers LCD viewing only and no EVF. But comparing its handling to my smartphone - and I'm late on this party owning one of those only since last year - I hate the latter for taking photos and love the former.

There surely is some different "tactile education" among "old-schooler's" and "early adaptor's" for all that touchscreen-wiping, special guestures.     It remembers a short (ironic) video clip a saw once with a young kid wiping across the front page of a comic book to make the content advance, apparently not being aware that one need to turn the page to continue reading.

So camera makers, please left over at least some few cam models w/o touchscreen and such. 

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Cheers,
Michael Fritzen

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