Testing focus at 5 meters

Started 2 months ago | Discussions
sirhawkeye64 Senior Member • Posts: 2,280
Testing focus at 5 meters

So I have a Tamron G2 70-200 lens and I have it calibrated for close focus (1m). I'm using a setup with a flat Reikan FoCal target (looks like a QR code which is maybe what it is), and a ruler next to it at a 45 degree angle. Both are well lit so AF can lock on.

Again, I'm using a similar set up to what Abbott uses in this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtNXtudLPbI

The ruler is still at 45 degrees from my close focus tests, which IMO at 16 ft away looks more flat from the perspective of the camera, especially at 70mm.

In my initial tests, my lens was showing significant back focusing. At 200mm the target is sharp and the DOF distribution (around the point of focus on the ruler) is acceptable. But when I go to 135mm and 100mm, it severely back focuses. At 135mm, I have adjusted the lens down to -20 with the tap-in console but there is still significant back focus.

Do I need to adjust the angle of the ruler up for testing at 5 meters (16.4 ft)?

(I'm doing this all at f/2.8 by the way so I can easily see DOF even though I may not shoot at this aperture much, in practice).

 sirhawkeye64's gear list:sirhawkeye64's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon Z7 Nikon Z6 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +9 more
Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2
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lokatz
lokatz Senior Member • Posts: 1,219
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters

sirhawkeye64 wrote:

So I have a Tamron G2 70-200 lens and I have it calibrated for close focus (1m). I'm using a setup with a flat Reikan FoCal target (looks like a QR code which is maybe what it is), and a ruler next to it at a 45 degree angle. Both are well lit so AF can lock on.

Again, I'm using a similar set up to what Abbott uses in this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtNXtudLPbI

The ruler is still at 45 degrees from my close focus tests, which IMO at 16 ft away looks more flat from the perspective of the camera, especially at 70mm.

In my initial tests, my lens was showing significant back focusing. At 200mm the target is sharp and the DOF distribution (around the point of focus on the ruler) is acceptable. But when I go to 135mm and 100mm, it severely back focuses. At 135mm, I have adjusted the lens down to -20 with the tap-in console but there is still significant back focus.

Do I need to adjust the angle of the ruler up for testing at 5 meters (16.4 ft)?

(I'm doing this all at f/2.8 by the way so I can easily see DOF even though I may not shoot at this aperture much, in practice).

The ruler method is quite unreliable, so at the very least you'll want to repeat your evaluations several times to be sure. It won't do much for you at 16ft and 70mm, however: assuming you use the lens wide open, at f/2.8, the DOF on a DX body is -.84ft and +.94ft and on an FX body 1.23/1.45ft.  You'd need a LOOOOOOONG ruler for that, so how do you actually determine back or front focus?  Move camera and lens to something like 5ft, and you'll get a more usable -.12/+.13ft on DX.

It is perfectly normal for the lens to require different AF fine-tune settings at different focal lengths, so what you are seeing, assuming it turns out to be real, may not be that unusual. Requiring more than +-20 is not normal, though, and if all your results are either close to 0 or significantly back focused, your body or lens may need AF adjusting.

If repeat testing confirms this, and you are sure of your methodology, I would take them in for service.

 lokatz's gear list:lokatz's gear list
Panasonic ZS100 Nikon D700 Nikon D5100 Nikon D500 Nikon D7500 +21 more
OP sirhawkeye64 Senior Member • Posts: 2,280
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters

lokatz wrote:

sirhawkeye64 wrote:

So I have a Tamron G2 70-200 lens and I have it calibrated for close focus (1m). I'm using a setup with a flat Reikan FoCal target (looks like a QR code which is maybe what it is), and a ruler next to it at a 45 degree angle. Both are well lit so AF can lock on.

Again, I'm using a similar set up to what Abbott uses in this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtNXtudLPbI

The ruler is still at 45 degrees from my close focus tests, which IMO at 16 ft away looks more flat from the perspective of the camera, especially at 70mm.

In my initial tests, my lens was showing significant back focusing. At 200mm the target is sharp and the DOF distribution (around the point of focus on the ruler) is acceptable. But when I go to 135mm and 100mm, it severely back focuses. At 135mm, I have adjusted the lens down to -20 with the tap-in console but there is still significant back focus.

Do I need to adjust the angle of the ruler up for testing at 5 meters (16.4 ft)?

(I'm doing this all at f/2.8 by the way so I can easily see DOF even though I may not shoot at this aperture much, in practice).

The ruler method is quite unreliable, so at the very least you'll want to repeat your evaluations several times to be sure. It won't do much for you at 16ft and 70mm, however: assuming you use the lens wide open, at f/2.8, the DOF on a DX body is -.84ft and +.94ft and on an FX body 1.23/1.45ft. You'd need a LOOOOOOONG ruler for that, so how do you actually determine back or front focus? Move camera and lens to something like 5ft, and you'll get a more usable -.12/+.13ft on DX.

It is perfectly normal for the lens to require different AF fine-tune settings at different focal lengths, so what you are seeing, assuming it turns out to be real, may not be that unusual. Requiring more than +-20 is not normal, though, and if all your results are either close to 0 or significantly back focused, your body or lens may need AF adjusting.

If repeat testing confirms this, and you are sure of your methodology, I would take them in for service.

I've determined that there is an issue with the lens.  I've tried against a regular test setup (flat test target that's parallel to the focal plane, and then a ruler next to it at a 45 degree angle).  This works fine at close range (close focus,. between min focus of 0.95m and 3m).

So then I did a "real world" test indoors, in good light, with some cans of veggies.

I set three cans, at a diagonal with the left can being the closest, the middle can was about 2 inches back, and the third can was about 4 inches back from the front of the first can.  When shot at more than 3m, the rear most can was in sharp focus, and all others were out of focus (slightly for the middle can).

So I reversed the setup (right can is now closest) and re-did the tests.  Now the can on the left (which is farthest back) was in sharp focus.

All of this also was with -20 adjustment on the lens and I even tried -20 adjustment on the body, and still the same results (the -20 on the body had little effect IMO).  Oddly enough, at 200mm and around 5m, it seems to work fine, but when you go to 135mm at more than 3m, that's when it starts to behave in an odd manner, unless I'm doing something wrong.  I'll try to post some pictures later.

But I'm about at the point where I may send it in to Tamron to be looked at, as it seems this is odd behavior IMO.  I could understand if it wasn't working at all FLs, but at 200mm, and only 200mm it seems OK (not perfect, but acceptable).

 sirhawkeye64's gear list:sirhawkeye64's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon Z7 Nikon Z6 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +9 more
geoffrey630 New Member • Posts: 13
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters
1

sirhawkeye64 wrote:

lokatz wrote:

sirhawkeye64 wrote:

So I have a Tamron G2 70-200 lens and I have it calibrated for close focus (1m). I'm using a setup with a flat Reikan FoCal target (looks like a QR code which is maybe what it is), and a ruler next to it at a 45 degree angle. Both are well lit so AF can lock on.

Again, I'm using a similar set up to what Abbott uses in this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtNXtudLPbI

The ruler is still at 45 degrees from my close focus tests, which IMO at 16 ft away looks more flat from the perspective of the camera, especially at 70mm.

In my initial tests, my lens was showing significant back focusing. At 200mm the target is sharp and the DOF distribution (around the point of focus on the ruler) is acceptable. But when I go to 135mm and 100mm, it severely back focuses. At 135mm, I have adjusted the lens down to -20 with the tap-in console but there is still significant back focus.

Do I need to adjust the angle of the ruler up for testing at 5 meters (16.4 ft)?

(I'm doing this all at f/2.8 by the way so I can easily see DOF even though I may not shoot at this aperture much, in practice).

The ruler method is quite unreliable, so at the very least you'll want to repeat your evaluations several times to be sure. It won't do much for you at 16ft and 70mm, however: assuming you use the lens wide open, at f/2.8, the DOF on a DX body is -.84ft and +.94ft and on an FX body 1.23/1.45ft. You'd need a LOOOOOOONG ruler for that, so how do you actually determine back or front focus? Move camera and lens to something like 5ft, and you'll get a more usable -.12/+.13ft on DX.

It is perfectly normal for the lens to require different AF fine-tune settings at different focal lengths, so what you are seeing, assuming it turns out to be real, may not be that unusual. Requiring more than +-20 is not normal, though, and if all your results are either close to 0 or significantly back focused, your body or lens may need AF adjusting.

If repeat testing confirms this, and you are sure of your methodology, I would take them in for service.

I've determined that there is an issue with the lens. I've tried against a regular test setup (flat test target that's parallel to the focal plane, and then a ruler next to it at a 45 degree angle). This works fine at close range (close focus,. between min focus of 0.95m and 3m).

So then I did a "real world" test indoors, in good light, with some cans of veggies.

I set three cans, at a diagonal with the left can being the closest, the middle can was about 2 inches back, and the third can was about 4 inches back from the front of the first can. When shot at more than 3m, the rear most can was in sharp focus, and all others were out of focus (slightly for the middle can).

So I reversed the setup (right can is now closest) and re-did the tests. Now the can on the left (which is farthest back) was in sharp focus.

All of this also was with -20 adjustment on the lens and I even tried -20 adjustment on the body, and still the same results (the -20 on the body had little effect IMO). Oddly enough, at 200mm and around 5m, it seems to work fine, but when you go to 135mm at more than 3m, that's when it starts to behave in an odd manner, unless I'm doing something wrong. I'll try to post some pictures later.

But I'm about at the point where I may send it in to Tamron to be looked at, as it seems this is odd behavior IMO. I could understand if it wasn't working at all FLs, but at 200mm, and only 200mm it seems OK (not perfect, but acceptable).

I had similar issues at 135mm but got it mostly worked out: https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/4340307#forum-post-61936718

I don't have any issues now. I probably could get better Reikan values if I set the camera body to -5 and redo everything but it's a pain to do all of this . Maybe if I'm really bored.

Unfortunately when you make one adjustment at any focal length/distance it changes everything a little.

Just to make sure, are you using a good light source (not LEDs) with Reikan?

OP sirhawkeye64 Senior Member • Posts: 2,280
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters

geoffrey630 wrote:

sirhawkeye64 wrote:

lokatz wrote:

sirhawkeye64 wrote:

So I have a Tamron G2 70-200 lens and I have it calibrated for close focus (1m). I'm using a setup with a flat Reikan FoCal target (looks like a QR code which is maybe what it is), and a ruler next to it at a 45 degree angle. Both are well lit so AF can lock on.

Again, I'm using a similar set up to what Abbott uses in this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtNXtudLPbI

The ruler is still at 45 degrees from my close focus tests, which IMO at 16 ft away looks more flat from the perspective of the camera, especially at 70mm.

In my initial tests, my lens was showing significant back focusing. At 200mm the target is sharp and the DOF distribution (around the point of focus on the ruler) is acceptable. But when I go to 135mm and 100mm, it severely back focuses. At 135mm, I have adjusted the lens down to -20 with the tap-in console but there is still significant back focus.

Do I need to adjust the angle of the ruler up for testing at 5 meters (16.4 ft)?

(I'm doing this all at f/2.8 by the way so I can easily see DOF even though I may not shoot at this aperture much, in practice).

The ruler method is quite unreliable, so at the very least you'll want to repeat your evaluations several times to be sure. It won't do much for you at 16ft and 70mm, however: assuming you use the lens wide open, at f/2.8, the DOF on a DX body is -.84ft and +.94ft and on an FX body 1.23/1.45ft. You'd need a LOOOOOOONG ruler for that, so how do you actually determine back or front focus? Move camera and lens to something like 5ft, and you'll get a more usable -.12/+.13ft on DX.

It is perfectly normal for the lens to require different AF fine-tune settings at different focal lengths, so what you are seeing, assuming it turns out to be real, may not be that unusual. Requiring more than +-20 is not normal, though, and if all your results are either close to 0 or significantly back focused, your body or lens may need AF adjusting.

If repeat testing confirms this, and you are sure of your methodology, I would take them in for service.

I've determined that there is an issue with the lens. I've tried against a regular test setup (flat test target that's parallel to the focal plane, and then a ruler next to it at a 45 degree angle). This works fine at close range (close focus,. between min focus of 0.95m and 3m).

So then I did a "real world" test indoors, in good light, with some cans of veggies.

I set three cans, at a diagonal with the left can being the closest, the middle can was about 2 inches back, and the third can was about 4 inches back from the front of the first can. When shot at more than 3m, the rear most can was in sharp focus, and all others were out of focus (slightly for the middle can).

So I reversed the setup (right can is now closest) and re-did the tests. Now the can on the left (which is farthest back) was in sharp focus.

All of this also was with -20 adjustment on the lens and I even tried -20 adjustment on the body, and still the same results (the -20 on the body had little effect IMO). Oddly enough, at 200mm and around 5m, it seems to work fine, but when you go to 135mm at more than 3m, that's when it starts to behave in an odd manner, unless I'm doing something wrong. I'll try to post some pictures later.

But I'm about at the point where I may send it in to Tamron to be looked at, as it seems this is odd behavior IMO. I could understand if it wasn't working at all FLs, but at 200mm, and only 200mm it seems OK (not perfect, but acceptable).

I had similar issues at 135mm but got it mostly worked out: https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/4340307#forum-post-61936718

I don't have any issues now. I probably could get better Reikan values if I set the camera body to -5 and redo everything but it's a pain to do all of this . Maybe if I'm really bored.

Unfortunately when you make one adjustment at any focal length/distance it changes everything a little.

Just to make sure, are you using a good light source (not LEDs) with Reikan?

I will try an incandescent bulb. I think I'm using a 60w equiv. LED bulb in the light. HOwever, what I don't quite understand is why would it work fine at close focus (and even up to around 3m distance) and then at 5m, produce totally different results, even with the same lighting setup? The only difference is I'm 6 ft farther back (from 3m to 5m)?

I also re-did the tests using the same lighting, but with 4 pop cans, at a diagonal, spaced about 3 inches apart from eachother, so from front to back, I had 12 inches depth (which at 2.8 at 135mm and 200mm should be enough space to determine where DOF is falling and where focus is falling.  So far in those tests, at 5m, it seems that it back focuses, although in this test, it doesn't look as bad compared to the ruler test.  So when I focus on a middle can, the can behind it is in focus, but the can I focused on is slightly blurred.  I tried a few variations of this, even switching the angle of the cans so the left can was now farthest away and did the same test.  Only these results are reversed, but the can behind the one I focus on is still sharp.  I should note that with LV, the results are more accurate and the can I focused on is usually sharp.

 sirhawkeye64's gear list:sirhawkeye64's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon Z7 Nikon Z6 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +9 more
wingster999 Regular Member • Posts: 126
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters

Like others said, a ruler is unreliable. The problem is that as you move further away from the target, the slight error of focus location becomes more pronounced. When you are close you can focus on one hash mark of a ruler and verify repeatable measurements. When you move further away a slight shift in the focus target even with a tripod can creat a massive amount of change in the front/back focus of the ruler. I use live view first on a flat target with small lettering to establish capability and then go up and down on the fine tune until I get the same result. A little time consuming but more reliable in my view.

Now as to the G2. I spent several days calibrating mine (since sold for a VRII) and saw some positive and negative artifacts from this lens. On the positive side, it is very capable wide open and I was able to dial in some great results in the 70-150 range but up at 200 it required a combination of +10 in camera and +20 with the console to get the 200 sharp. Seems that a lot of zooms do this, where one of the ends of the range sits apart from the rest. I have a similar condition on a Sigma 24-35 where the 24 end is really different from the rest of the ranges.

Your -20 is puzzling to me as every Tamron I have handled front focused. What camera are you using this with? You may have to plug in a combination of camera fine tune and Tap In Console tune to get what you need.

In my experience with 3rd party zooms (Sigma and Tamron) you must use the docks to resolve changes in focal lengths. A single adjustment in camera will never completely reconcile all the focus issues. I would even extend this to prime lenses in many cases.

Sagittarius Veteran Member • Posts: 5,875
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters
1

wingster999 wrote:

Like others said, a ruler is unreliable. The problem is that as you move further away from the target, the slight error of focus location becomes more pronounced. When you are close you can focus on one hash mark of a ruler and verify repeatable measurements. When you move further away a slight shift in the focus target even with a tripod can creat a massive amount of change in the front/back focus of the ruler. I use live view first on a flat target with small lettering to establish capability and then go up and down on the fine tune until I get the same result. A little time consuming but more reliable in my view.

Now as to the G2. I spent several days calibrating mine (since sold for a VRII) and saw some positive and negative artifacts from this lens. On the positive side, it is very capable wide open and I was able to dial in some great results in the 70-150 range but up at 200 it required a combination of +10 in camera and +20 with the console to get the 200 sharp. Seems that a lot of zooms do this, where one of the ends of the range sits apart from the rest. I have a similar condition on a Sigma 24-35 where the 24 end is really different from the rest of the ranges.

Your -20 is puzzling to me as every Tamron I have handled front focused. What camera are you using this with? You may have to plug in a combination of camera fine tune and Tap In Console tune to get what you need.

In my experience with 3rd party zooms (Sigma and Tamron) you must use the docks to resolve changes in focal lengths. A single adjustment in camera will never completely reconcile all the focus issues. I would even extend this to prime lenses in many cases.

What is wrong with the ruler. He does not focuses on the ruler. The focus is on the flat target. Ruler just shows DOF distribution, that is all.

Putting ruler at different angles just changes the front to back distance to make sure full DOF distance will fit.

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 Sagittarius's gear list:Sagittarius's gear list
Nikon D810 Nikon D500 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II Nikon AF-S Micro-Nikkor 105mm F2.8G IF-ED VR +4 more
OP sirhawkeye64 Senior Member • Posts: 2,280
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters

wingster999 wrote:

Like others said, a ruler is unreliable. The problem is that as you move further away from the target, the slight error of focus location becomes more pronounced. When you are close you can focus on one hash mark of a ruler and verify repeatable measurements. When you move further away a slight shift in the focus target even with a tripod can creat a massive amount of change in the front/back focus of the ruler. I use live view first on a flat target with small lettering to establish capability and then go up and down on the fine tune until I get the same result. A little time consuming but more reliable in my view.

Now as to the G2. I spent several days calibrating mine (since sold for a VRII) and saw some positive and negative artifacts from this lens. On the positive side, it is very capable wide open and I was able to dial in some great results in the 70-150 range but up at 200 it required a combination of +10 in camera and +20 with the console to get the 200 sharp. Seems that a lot of zooms do this, where one of the ends of the range sits apart from the rest. I have a similar condition on a Sigma 24-35 where the 24 end is really different from the rest of the ranges.

Your -20 is puzzling to me as every Tamron I have handled front focused. What camera are you using this with? You may have to plug in a combination of camera fine tune and Tap In Console tune to get what you need.

In my experience with 3rd party zooms (Sigma and Tamron) you must use the docks to resolve changes in focal lengths. A single adjustment in camera will never completely reconcile all the focus issues. I would even extend this to prime lenses in many cases.

I've determined it was actually a problem with the camera. Swapped out the camera for a new one (previous one needed some work that cost half the value of the camera so I traded it). Long story short, the newer camera performs much better and my results are way much better. (The previous camera needed the mirror adjusted and some stuff relating to the AF system.  More money than what I wanted to put into the thing since it was 2.5 years old.)

 sirhawkeye64's gear list:sirhawkeye64's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon Z7 Nikon Z6 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +9 more
wingster999 Regular Member • Posts: 126
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters

sirhawkeye64 wrote:

wingster999 wrote:

Like others said, a ruler is unreliable. The problem is that as you move further away from the target, the slight error of focus location becomes more pronounced. When you are close you can focus on one hash mark of a ruler and verify repeatable measurements. When you move further away a slight shift in the focus target even with a tripod can creat a massive amount of change in the front/back focus of the ruler. I use live view first on a flat target with small lettering to establish capability and then go up and down on the fine tune until I get the same result. A little time consuming but more reliable in my view.

Now as to the G2. I spent several days calibrating mine (since sold for a VRII) and saw some positive and negative artifacts from this lens. On the positive side, it is very capable wide open and I was able to dial in some great results in the 70-150 range but up at 200 it required a combination of +10 in camera and +20 with the console to get the 200 sharp. Seems that a lot of zooms do this, where one of the ends of the range sits apart from the rest. I have a similar condition on a Sigma 24-35 where the 24 end is really different from the rest of the ranges.

Your -20 is puzzling to me as every Tamron I have handled front focused. What camera are you using this with? You may have to plug in a combination of camera fine tune and Tap In Console tune to get what you need.

In my experience with 3rd party zooms (Sigma and Tamron) you must use the docks to resolve changes in focal lengths. A single adjustment in camera will never completely reconcile all the focus issues. I would even extend this to prime lenses in many cases.

I've determined it was actually a problem with the camera. Swapped out the camera for a new one (previous one needed some work that cost half the value of the camera so I traded it). Long story short, the newer camera performs much better and my results are way much better. (The previous camera needed the mirror adjusted and some stuff relating to the AF system. More money than what I wanted to put into the thing since it was 2.5 years old.)

That makes sense. I thought -20 on a Tamron was odd.

wingster999 Regular Member • Posts: 126
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters

Sagittarius wrote:

wingster999 wrote:

Like others said, a ruler is unreliable. The problem is that as you move further away from the target, the slight error of focus location becomes more pronounced. When you are close you can focus on one hash mark of a ruler and verify repeatable measurements. When you move further away a slight shift in the focus target even with a tripod can creat a massive amount of change in the front/back focus of the ruler. I use live view first on a flat target with small lettering to establish capability and then go up and down on the fine tune until I get the same result. A little time consuming but more reliable in my view.

Now as to the G2. I spent several days calibrating mine (since sold for a VRII) and saw some positive and negative artifacts from this lens. On the positive side, it is very capable wide open and I was able to dial in some great results in the 70-150 range but up at 200 it required a combination of +10 in camera and +20 with the console to get the 200 sharp. Seems that a lot of zooms do this, where one of the ends of the range sits apart from the rest. I have a similar condition on a Sigma 24-35 where the 24 end is really different from the rest of the ranges.

Your -20 is puzzling to me as every Tamron I have handled front focused. What camera are you using this with? You may have to plug in a combination of camera fine tune and Tap In Console tune to get what you need.

In my experience with 3rd party zooms (Sigma and Tamron) you must use the docks to resolve changes in focal lengths. A single adjustment in camera will never completely reconcile all the focus issues. I would even extend this to prime lenses in many cases.

What is wrong with the ruler. He does not focuses on the ruler. The focus is on the flat target. Ruler just shows DOF distribution, that is all.

Putting ruler at different angles just changes the front to back distance to make sure full DOF distance will fit.

Your right, my bad. I have used rulers to indicate which direction to go in adjustment but for final tweaks rely on specific flat targets that will mimic real world shooting.

OP sirhawkeye64 Senior Member • Posts: 2,280
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters

wingster999 wrote:

sirhawkeye64 wrote:

wingster999 wrote:

Like others said, a ruler is unreliable. The problem is that as you move further away from the target, the slight error of focus location becomes more pronounced. When you are close you can focus on one hash mark of a ruler and verify repeatable measurements. When you move further away a slight shift in the focus target even with a tripod can creat a massive amount of change in the front/back focus of the ruler. I use live view first on a flat target with small lettering to establish capability and then go up and down on the fine tune until I get the same result. A little time consuming but more reliable in my view.

Now as to the G2. I spent several days calibrating mine (since sold for a VRII) and saw some positive and negative artifacts from this lens. On the positive side, it is very capable wide open and I was able to dial in some great results in the 70-150 range but up at 200 it required a combination of +10 in camera and +20 with the console to get the 200 sharp. Seems that a lot of zooms do this, where one of the ends of the range sits apart from the rest. I have a similar condition on a Sigma 24-35 where the 24 end is really different from the rest of the ranges.

Your -20 is puzzling to me as every Tamron I have handled front focused. What camera are you using this with? You may have to plug in a combination of camera fine tune and Tap In Console tune to get what you need.

In my experience with 3rd party zooms (Sigma and Tamron) you must use the docks to resolve changes in focal lengths. A single adjustment in camera will never completely reconcile all the focus issues. I would even extend this to prime lenses in many cases.

I've determined it was actually a problem with the camera. Swapped out the camera for a new one (previous one needed some work that cost half the value of the camera so I traded it). Long story short, the newer camera performs much better and my results are way much better. (The previous camera needed the mirror adjusted and some stuff relating to the AF system. More money than what I wanted to put into the thing since it was 2.5 years old.)

That makes sense. I thought -20 on a Tamron was odd.

Yeah I haven't tuned it with new camera yet, but so far, it looks like it will be minimal as focus (against a flat target are dead on, but it still does front/back focus a little, but my numbers should be within reason (maybe a 5/6 or less in both directions, depending on the FL/distance).

 sirhawkeye64's gear list:sirhawkeye64's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon Z7 Nikon Z6 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +9 more
Sagittarius Veteran Member • Posts: 5,875
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters

Are you using tap console?

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 Sagittarius's gear list:Sagittarius's gear list
Nikon D810 Nikon D500 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II Nikon AF-S Micro-Nikkor 105mm F2.8G IF-ED VR +4 more
OP sirhawkeye64 Senior Member • Posts: 2,280
Re: Testing focus at 5 meters

Sagittarius wrote:

Are you using tap console?

Yes.  Although I haven't done any calibration yet on the new camera.  Will probably do that this week, but I'm saying that out of the box with the new body, already a big improvement without any calibration yet.

 sirhawkeye64's gear list:sirhawkeye64's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon Z7 Nikon Z6 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +9 more
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