RX100M6, speeding trains

Started Dec 9, 2018 | Discussions
Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,468
RX100M6, speeding trains
4

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

 Digital Nigel's gear list:Digital Nigel's gear list
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Bill Borne
Bill Borne Forum Pro • Posts: 40,806
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

-- hide signature --

Bill
"Life's Too Short to Worry about the BS!"
So I Choose my Battles
Click for Wild Man's Photos
Using Rx10 IV at Present

 Bill Borne's gear list:Bill Borne's gear list
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Horacecoker Senior Member • Posts: 2,666
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

 Horacecoker's gear list:Horacecoker's gear list
Sony RX100 III Sony RX10 IV Sony a7R III Sony a6600 Sony FE 55mm F1.8 +2 more
Bill Borne
Bill Borne Forum Pro • Posts: 40,806
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

Of course it would David for pixel peepers. His original is a smeary mess. Same with 1st shot.  How you gonna fix that????? The one I did is for normal viewing!

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Bill
"Life's Too Short to Worry about the BS!"
So I Choose my Battles
Click for Wild Man's Photos
Using Rx10 IV at Present

 Bill Borne's gear list:Bill Borne's gear list
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Horacecoker Senior Member • Posts: 2,666
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains
2

Bill Borne wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

Of course it would David for pixel peepers. His original is a smeary mess. Same with 1st shot. How you gonna fix that????? The one I did is for normal viewing!

Normal viewing? Normal viewing to me is an image that is at least 8mb to fill a 4k screen. 2mp images or less belong in the dark ages. The thing is you can't fix it, 6400 ISO on a 1" sensor is rubbish!

David

 Horacecoker's gear list:Horacecoker's gear list
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OP Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,468
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains
1

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

Of course it would David for pixel peepers. His original is a smeary mess. Same with 1st shot. How you gonna fix that????? The one I did is for normal viewing!

Normal viewing? Normal viewing to me is an image that is at least 8mb to fill a 4k screen. 2mp images or less belong in the dark ages. The thing is you can't fix it, 6400 ISO on a 1" sensor is rubbish!

Certainly not ideal, no. But I think the first of those images was usable, considering the conditions, the second not. Obviously neither comes close to what you set out to achieve with your close-up bird pictures, but that's a perfectly usable picture of a fast moving train in poor light conditions.

Would an A9 have done better?  Yes, of course, but I wouldn't have been carrying one. Would an RX10M4 have done better?  Probably not much, if any.

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OP Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,468
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

If I wanted something like that, I would have simply turned up the NR in PhotoLab, and downsized:

Yes, there's visible noise, but that's much better than smearing it up so it looks like a water colour.

 Digital Nigel's gear list:Digital Nigel's gear list
Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Nikon Coolpix P900 Panasonic ZS100 Sony RX10 III +18 more
Bill Borne
Bill Borne Forum Pro • Posts: 40,806
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

Of course it would David for pixel peepers. His original is a smeary mess. Same with 1st shot. How you gonna fix that????? The one I did is for normal viewing!

Normal viewing? Normal viewing to me is an image that is at least 8mb to fill a 4k screen. 2mp images or less belong in the dark ages. The thing is you can't fix it, 6400 ISO on a 1" sensor is rubbish!

David

Well no kidding David Duh

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Bill
"Life's Too Short to Worry about the BS!"
So I Choose my Battles
Click for Wild Man's Photos
Using Rx10 IV at Present

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Bill Borne
Bill Borne Forum Pro • Posts: 40,806
disregard
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sludge21017
sludge21017 Senior Member • Posts: 1,952
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

It kind of looks like the trains are parked.

OP Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,468
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

sludge21017 wrote:

It kind of looks like the trains are parked.

Have you noticed the shutter speeds?

 Digital Nigel's gear list:Digital Nigel's gear list
Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Nikon Coolpix P900 Panasonic ZS100 Sony RX10 III +18 more
Horacecoker Senior Member • Posts: 2,666
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains
1

Digital Nigel wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

Of course it would David for pixel peepers. His original is a smeary mess. Same with 1st shot. How you gonna fix that????? The one I did is for normal viewing!

Normal viewing? Normal viewing to me is an image that is at least 8mb to fill a 4k screen. 2mp images or less belong in the dark ages. The thing is you can't fix it, 6400 ISO on a 1" sensor is rubbish!

Certainly not ideal, no. But I think the first of those images was usable, considering the conditions, the second not. Obviously neither comes close to what you set out to achieve with your close-up bird pictures, but that's a perfectly usable picture of a fast moving train in poor light conditions.

I think you proved your point splendidly with these images regards the superb focusing abilities with the RX100vi. I remember when you did a similar experiment with the RX10iii. That camera was pretty hopeless and always has been with anything that moved even remotely fast.

I didn't post to knock the image quality of your images. I just don't think it's right for folk to say they have altered somebody's image for the batter then post it seriously downsized. Anybody can do that especially if it concerns noise or lack of sharpness or focusing issues. All these three problems magically disappear - sometimes to a great extent - by downsizing, as you well know.

Would an RX10M4 have done better? Probably not much, if any.

The RX10iv would definitely not have done any better, especially with the noise. I don't really know why you've mentioned that.

David

 Horacecoker's gear list:Horacecoker's gear list
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(unknown member) Senior Member • Posts: 2,265
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

The brightened up image looks rather good and makes a rather atmospheric image but i then i suppose there is no pleasing the molecular scientists looking at the results from the microscopic analysis.

I am amazed that the camera could grab focus on this.

dbogdan
dbogdan Senior Member • Posts: 1,401
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

KeepCalm wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

The brightened up image looks rather good and makes a rather atmospheric image but i then i suppose there is no pleasing the molecular scientists looking at the results from the microscopic analysis.

I am amazed that the camera could grab focus on this.

I concur, there is something to be said of the fine job being done by the Image investigators, more commonly known as the "Picture Police" , though! 👁

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OP Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,468
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

KeepCalm wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

The brightened up image looks rather good and makes a rather atmospheric image but i then i suppose there is no pleasing the molecular scientists looking at the results from the microscopic analysis.

I am amazed that the camera could grab focus on this.

Yes, that's the key point, that some people seem to have missed: I was testing how well the little camera could focus on fast moving objects in poor light. I was not testing the low light performance of the 1" sensor -- this is my sixth 1" sensor camera, so I already know how far you can push the ISO. What I wanted to find was just how good or bad this one would be as an action camera (my other five are not, as they don't have PDAF).

Incidentally, I've extracted the embedded small JPEG from the RAW file. This represents what an OOC JPEG would have looked like:

This is the unedited, small OOC JPEG embedded in the RAW file. Somehow, the camera managed to attain sharp focus on the moving train in near darkness.

Now you can see why I'm so impressed with its focusing abilities.

And no wonder the shadows look noisy when you brighten it up!

 Digital Nigel's gear list:Digital Nigel's gear list
Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Nikon Coolpix P900 Panasonic ZS100 Sony RX10 III +18 more
Horacecoker Senior Member • Posts: 2,666
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains
1

KeepCalm wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

The brightened up image looks rather good and makes a rather atmospheric image but i then i suppose there is no pleasing the molecular scientists looking at the results from the microscopic analysis.

You could apply the same sarcasm for any shot that was ever taken with any  photographic device in the history of photography, if someone happens to say the image quality is pretty bad.

I am amazed that the camera could grab focus on this.

And that was (I think) the whole point of the thread.

David

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OP Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,468
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains
1

Horacecoker wrote:

KeepCalm wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

The brightened up image looks rather good and makes a rather atmospheric image but i then i suppose there is no pleasing the molecular scientists looking at the results from the microscopic analysis.

You could apply the same sarcasm for any shot that was ever taken with any photographic device in the history of photography, if someone happens to say the image quality is pretty bad.

I am amazed that the camera could grab focus on this.

And that was (I think) the whole point of the thread.

Exactly!

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Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Nikon Coolpix P900 Panasonic ZS100 Sony RX10 III +18 more
(unknown member) Senior Member • Posts: 2,265
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

Digital Nigel wrote:

KeepCalm wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

The brightened up image looks rather good and makes a rather atmospheric image but i then i suppose there is no pleasing the molecular scientists looking at the results from the microscopic analysis.

I am amazed that the camera could grab focus on this.

Yes, that's the key point, that some people seem to have missed: I was testing how well the little camera could focus on fast moving objects in poor light. I was not testing the low light performance of the 1" sensor -- this is my sixth 1" sensor camera, so I already know how far you can push the ISO. What I wanted to find was just how good or bad this one would be as an action camera (my other five are not, as they don't have PDAF).

Incidentally, I've extracted the embedded small JPEG from the RAW file. This represents what an OOC JPEG would have looked like:

This is the unedited, small OOC JPEG embedded in the RAW file. Somehow, the camera managed to attain sharp focus on the moving train in near darkness.

Now you can see why I'm so impressed with its focusing abilities.

And no wonder the shadows look noisy when you brighten it up!

Noise actually adds atmosphere to a night image and I am sure many people hating any noise in a modern image are probably busy fawning elsewhere over how utterly gorgeous some  grainy old Cartier Bresson image is.

OP Digital Nigel Veteran Member • Posts: 9,468
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

KeepCalm wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

KeepCalm wrote:

Horacecoker wrote:

Bill Borne wrote:

Digital Nigel wrote:

I've just bought an RX100M6, and decided to try it out shooting speeding trains in low light. I like travelling on and photographic steam trains, and I wouldn't normally use a little camera like the RX100. More probably, I'd use my A6500 with 16-70 lens. But the little RX100 has a much wider zoom range, so I wondered how well it would do.

This picture was taken about five minutes before official sunset, on an overcast, rainy day, so the light was terrible. The modern train was speeding past, and unlike a steam train, doesn't have many details to focus on:

The camera managed to focus on a fast-moving train in very low light (ISO6400)

But then I perhaps pushed it too far. The next shot was taken half an hour later, around 25 minutes after sunset. But even in near-darkness, the camera still managed to focus on the fast train. However, there's a limit on how far you can push a little 1" sensor:

Even DxO PhotoLab struggles to clean up this very low light, ISO6400 image (obviously flash cannot be used in such situations).

-

One other discovery I (re)made: when shooting in continuous mode, even at low frame rates, the eShutter is used, so you can to watch out for rolling shutter effects when panning.

Hmmm...I think it can be cleaned up a little more?

??????

Cleaned up by downsizing to 1.7mp, maybe. But let's see your more cleaned up version at full res which is what Nigel posted. My betting is it will just be a smeary mess.

David

The brightened up image looks rather good and makes a rather atmospheric image but i then i suppose there is no pleasing the molecular scientists looking at the results from the microscopic analysis.

I am amazed that the camera could grab focus on this.

Yes, that's the key point, that some people seem to have missed: I was testing how well the little camera could focus on fast moving objects in poor light. I was not testing the low light performance of the 1" sensor -- this is my sixth 1" sensor camera, so I already know how far you can push the ISO. What I wanted to find was just how good or bad this one would be as an action camera (my other five are not, as they don't have PDAF).

Incidentally, I've extracted the embedded small JPEG from the RAW file. This represents what an OOC JPEG would have looked like:

This is the unedited, small OOC JPEG embedded in the RAW file. Somehow, the camera managed to attain sharp focus on the moving train in near darkness.

Now you can see why I'm so impressed with its focusing abilities.

And no wonder the shadows look noisy when you brighten it up!

Noise actually adds atmosphere to a night image and I am sure many people hating any noise in a modern image are probably busy fawning elsewhere over how utterly gorgeous some grainy old Cartier Bresson image is.

Yes, I agree. That's why I toned down the possible levels of NR in that image. As a night-time image, it shouldn't be brightened up and the grainy shadows turned into shiny plastic surfaces. That makes it look like an image from a comic book.

 Digital Nigel's gear list:Digital Nigel's gear list
Panasonic FZ1000 Canon PowerShot G7 X Nikon Coolpix P900 Panasonic ZS100 Sony RX10 III +18 more
Digital Shutterbug Veteran Member • Posts: 4,117
Re: RX100M6, speeding trains

KeepCalm wrote:

... there is no pleasing the molecular scientists looking at the results from the microscopic analysis.

I love it. "Molecular scientists", as applied to the pixel peepers. Good one!!! 

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Steve

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