3 Yonguno 216s for studio how good would they be?

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Smithy Boy New Member • Posts: 3
3 Yonguno 216s for studio how good would they be?

I'm planning to setup a small home studio, and was wonder whether this setup would be a good investment. And if any who has used these products has had any bad experinces with it.

3× yongnuo yn216

Neewer Light gels

Loads of diffusion stuff and white cloth (for bouncing and extra diffusion)

Thanks in advance for any answers!

Sailor Blue
Sailor Blue Forum Pro • Posts: 13,241
Re: 3 Yonguno 216s for studio how good would they be?
3

I don't shoot video so I won't comment on whether these are sufficient for video.

They are totally insufficient for still portraiture.

Constant lights bright enough for portraiture are typically so bright that they cause squinting and tearing. Being the portrait subject with constant lighting is not a pleasant job.

For portraiture you want to be able to use the camera's minimum ISO, an aperture in the f/2.8-f/16 range, and a shutter speed fast enough to make subject movement and camera shake minimum problems. If you want to do portraiture then you want studio strobes. Strobes provide the power you need to meet these requirements and a modeling light to show you the light on the subject, which is critical.

Don't waste your money on cheap low quality studio gear. I did that the first time I bought studio gear and most of what I bought quickly wound up in the trash bin, a total waste of my money. The second time I got smarter, studied and asked lots of questions before buying good quality budget priced gear that has been going strong since 2010.  Today the budget priced studio gear is much wider than it was for me in 2010.

I wrote this to help other photographers avoid my costly mistake.

Sailorblue - Equipment Guide for Setting up a Small Home Portrait-Glamor Studio

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Gato Amarillo Veteran Member • Posts: 5,391
Re: 3 Yonguno 216s for studio how good would they be?

Unless you do video go for flash For still subjects working on a tripod, these might be pasable. Or if you don't mind using high ISO.

If you plan to do video you need continuous light and these might be a minimally effective start, but for stills you get more for your money from flash.

Look at the YN 560 series flash as an alternative for about the same money. Or for a little more money you can look at some of the more powerful lights from Godox and others.

Gato

Sailor Blue
Sailor Blue Forum Pro • Posts: 13,241
Re: 3 Yonguno 216s for studio how good would they be?
1

Gato Amarillo wrote:

Unless you do video go for flash For still subjects working on a tripod, these might be pasable. Or if you don't mind using high ISO.

If you plan to do video you need continuous light and these might be a minimally effective start, but for stills you get more for your money from flash.

Look at the YN 560 series flash as an alternative for about the same money. Or for a little more money you can look at some of the more powerful lights from Godox and others.

Gato

Many photographers do portraiture using hot-shoe flash, including me sometimes, but hot-shoe flash is a poor choice for portraiture vs a strobe.

Strobes give you more power, which means you can work at the minimum ISO for the maximum image quality, but what is most noticeably lacking with hot-shoe flash is a modeling light.

With a hot-shoe flash you guess at the position for the light, take a test shot, chimp the image, move the light, test shot, chimp, move, etc., etc., etc. By the time you get the light positioned to give you the right subject lighting the subject is disgusted with your unprofessional behavior - they expect you to know what you are doing and to do it quickly.

With a strobe the modeling light shows you the light on the subject. This means you can get the light position right the first time and in only a few seconds of time. All that messy and unprofessional taking of test shots and chimping before you actually get the desired portrait is eliminated.

Sailorblue - Why Studio Strobes, not Hot-Shoe Flash for Portraiture

Buying good quality strobes today is much less expensive than it was even a few years ago when I wrote this article.

Sailorblue - Equipment Guide for Setting up a Small Home Portrait-Glamor Studio

Today you can buy a usable 400Ws 4-stop range strobe for $139 from Adorama. A trip to a fabric store and $10 will get you enough translucent nylon or Dacron fabric to clothespin over the front to drop the light output another couple of stops, giving you over a 5-stop range of light output.

Adorama Flashpoint Studio 400 Monolight with Built-in R2 Radio

$30.80 can get you a nice collapsible* 43" white umbrella with a black backing as a light diffuser or $95 gets you a 48" octabox. Either of these are good for everything from head shots to full length portraits.

Adorama Westcott 43" White Satin Umbrella 2011

Adorama Glow EZ Lock Deep Parabolic Quick Softbox (48")

*The umbrella stem for this collapsible umbrella is 8mm in diameter. Be sure to check and make sure that any monolight you buy can accept an 8mm diameter umbrella stem - some don't. There are many non-collapsible umbrellas with smaller stems available.

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imnotmarvin
imnotmarvin Regular Member • Posts: 209
Re: 3 Yonguno 216s for studio how good would they be?

I don't think the modeling light is a reason to jump to strobes from speedlights personally. I make portraits indoors with speedlights and maybe take a few pops and light moves to get shadows where I want them. David Hobby shoots this way and has no issues with professionalism. Also my kit fits in a small camera bag. The only disadvantage for me is output when shooting outdoors in full sun. That's where Inwould prefer strobes.

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Kumsa Regular Member • Posts: 323
Re: 3 Yonguno 216s for studio how good would they be?

It's a fun LED model, I have one. I use it for wedding, event environment, where I need to add a little lighting that adds to whatever is ambient. If you get them, plan on purchasing the Sony batteries, as it just drains the AAs. Their output is not that much, though. and as was pointed out, you'll be capturing with high ISO.

That said, everything from Sailor Blue is spot on. You're just not the far away on price, and you'll have a much more flexible solution by using a strobe.

Someday, we'll have affordable, LEDs that'll pump out the light.

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