Parabolic reflectors in the studio

Started 5 months ago | Discussions
Serjojeee Regular Member • Posts: 363
Parabolic reflectors in the studio

Hi there!

Who regularly use parabolic reflectors and umbrellas in the studio? What's your setup - are you using them mostly as one light, or main light, at a distance or close enough to the model? How are you dealing with the spill, a hotspot, if you bring your umbrellas to the studio? Here in SPb studios mostly use Hensel and Profoto monoblocks. My profoto copy deep umbrellas prefer deep mount in the Hensel for it's open flash tube design but spill is a problem in colored rooms. And I prefer it as one light from a distance.

Sailor Blue
Sailor Blue Forum Pro • Posts: 12,728
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio
1

I use classical shallow umbrellas and double diffused softboxes. My most used softboxes have a flush front diffuser but I have one set with recessed front diffusers and grids. I don't have any parabolic reflectors but some information about them is given below.

Some general concepts for anyone who isn't familiar with umbrellas and softboxes.

Shoot through umbrellas are light grenades, blasting light out in a sphere around the umbrella and potentially causing all sorts of stray light problems. Shoot through mode is best used when the subject to any nearby surface or the background distance is much larger than the subject to umbrella distance so stray light interference is reduced according to the inverse square.

A shoot through umbrella produces a hot spot and the closer the umbrella is to the subject the more evident a hot spot will be. The light on the subject from a shoot through umbrella drops off to the sides faster than it does with a reflection umbrella because of the convex shape of the light source.

A reflection umbrella with a black backing reduces the stray light problem by more than 1/2. Light still spreads out in a hemisphere around the umbrella opening but the intensity drops off smoothly to the sides. The light on the subject is more even from a reflection umbrella than a shoot through umbrella but if you get too close there is a darker central area, the shadow of the body of the light.

Silver reflection umbrellas produce more specular light than white ones. This means a silver umbrella produces a greater difference between highlights and shadows and somewhat harder light. How specular and hard the light is depends on whether the umbrella lining is shiny, matte, or pebbled.

Depending on the design a deep reflection mode umbrella should have a faster fall off to the sides than a standard reflection umbrella. Many are poorly designed.

A true parabolic reflector beams light at the subject. Whether the light is focused to an area smaller than the reflector, the same size as the reflector, or greater than the reflector depends on the position of the light inside the reflector and how close the shape of the reflector is to a true parabolic reflector.

Almost all umbrella parabolic reflectors are not even close to being parabolic in shape and do a poor job of focusing the light.  Many so called parabolic umbrellas are just deep umbrellas.

Adding a sock makes an umbrella into a softbox, sometimes called a brollybox. Reflection of the light off the inside of the umbrella is the first way the light is diffused, the sock is the second way the light is diffused.

A classical softbox has the light outside the umbrella and aimed toward the front opening. The light is usually diffused twice by inner and outer pieces of fabric.

If the front diffuser of a softbox is flush the light spreads out to the sides very much like it does with an umbrella or brollybox. This type of softbox and a brolly box basically work the same for photography. Adding a grid is more difficult than if the front diffuser is recessed.

If the front diffuser of a softbox is recessed you get less spread of light to the sides, giving you a bit better control of subject and background lighting since the amount of stray light is reduced. Adding a grid to the front of a recessed front diffuser softbox is easy.

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OP Serjojeee Regular Member • Posts: 363
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio
1

Sailor Blue wrote:

I use classical shallow umbrellas and double diffused softboxes. My most used softboxes have a flush front diffuser but I have one set with recessed front diffusers and grids. I don't have any parabolic reflectors but some information about them is given below.

Some general concepts for anyone who isn't familiar with umbrellas and softboxes.

Shoot through umbrellas are light grenades, blasting light out in a sphere around the umbrella and potentially causing all sorts of stray light problems. Shoot through mode is best used when the subject to any nearby surface or the background distance is much larger than the subject to umbrella distance so stray light interference is reduced according to the inverse square.

A shoot through umbrella produces a hot spot and the closer the umbrella is to the subject the more evident a hot spot will be. The light on the subject from a shoot through umbrella drops off to the sides faster than it does with a reflection umbrella because of the convex shape of the light source.

A reflection umbrella with a black backing reduces the stray light problem by more than 1/2. Light still spreads out in a hemisphere around the umbrella opening but the intensity drops off smoothly to the sides. The light on the subject is more even from a reflection umbrella than a shoot through umbrella but if you get too close there is a darker central area, the shadow of the body of the light.

Silver reflection umbrellas produce more specular light than white ones. This means a silver umbrella produces a greater difference between highlights and shadows and somewhat harder light. How specular and hard the light is depends on whether the umbrella lining is shiny, matte, or pebbled.

Depending on the design a deep reflection mode umbrella should have a faster fall off to the sides than a standard reflection umbrella. Many are poorly designed.

A true parabolic reflector beams light at the subject. Whether the light is focused to an area smaller than the reflector, the same size as the reflector, or greater than the reflector depends on the position of the light inside the reflector and how close the shape of the reflector is to a true parabolic reflector.

Almost all umbrella parabolic reflectors are not even close to being parabolic in shape and do a poor job of focusing the light. Many so called parabolic umbrellas are just deep umbrellas.

Adding a sock makes an umbrella into a softbox, sometimes called a brollybox. Reflection of the light off the inside of the umbrella is the first way the light is diffused, the sock is the second way the light is diffused.

A classical softbox has the light outside the umbrella and aimed toward the front opening. The light is usually diffused twice by inner and outer pieces of fabric.

If the front diffuser of a softbox is flush the light spreads out to the sides very much like it does with an umbrella or brollybox. This type of softbox and a brolly box basically work the same for photography. Adding a grid is more difficult than if the front diffuser is recessed.

If the front diffuser of a softbox is recessed you get less spread of light to the sides, giving you a bit better control of subject and background lighting since the amount of stray light is reduced. Adding a grid to the front of a recessed front diffuser softbox is easy.

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Thanks for the reply, but I wanted to hear something from those who use them regularly. They are tricky instruments as I see )

Sailor Blue
Sailor Blue Forum Pro • Posts: 12,728
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

There was an extensive discussion about parabolic reflectors only a month ago.  You should take the time to read through it.

DPReview - Parabolic softbox/umbrella in practice?

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OP Serjojeee Regular Member • Posts: 363
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio
1

Sailor Blue wrote:

There was an extensive discussion about parabolic reflectors only a month ago. You should take the time to read through it.

DPReview - Parabolic softbox/umbrella in practice?

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Living and loving it in Pattaya, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

Thanks, I've read that already. That was kinda scientific theoretical discussion and I wanted some feedback from users. And as I see there are none of them here)

Macro guy
Macro guy Senior Member • Posts: 2,879
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio
2

Serjojeee wrote:

Sailor Blue wrote:

There was an extensive discussion about parabolic reflectors only a month ago. You should take the time to read through it.

DPReview - Parabolic softbox/umbrella in practice?

-- hide signature --

Living and loving it in Pattaya, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

Thanks, I've read that already. That was kinda scientific theoretical discussion and I wanted some feedback from users. And as I see there are none of them here)

That's probably because parabolic reflectors are extremely specific types of reflectors, which are not prevalent in the market place.

What's being marketed as "parabolic umbrellas" are nothing more than simple, deep umbrellas  with a bit more focus to them than the shallow umbrellas.

So, if you're asking about true parabolic reflectors, you won't find many users here, but if you're asking about deep umbrellas, then you'll have to rephrase your question to get more people to answer.

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Sailor Blue
Sailor Blue Forum Pro • Posts: 12,728
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

Serjojeee wrote:

Sailor Blue wrote:

There was an extensive discussion about parabolic reflectors only a month ago. You should take the time to read through it.

DPReview - Parabolic softbox/umbrella in practice?

-- hide signature --

Living and loving it in Pattaya, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

Thanks, I've read that already. That was kinda scientific theoretical discussion and I wanted some feedback from users. And as I see there are none of them here)

The PCB PLMs are about as close to a true umbrella type parabolic reflector as you can find.  I suggest you ask your question on the PCB Technical Forum.

Paul C. Buff, Inc. Technical Forum

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OP Serjojeee Regular Member • Posts: 363
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

Sailor Blue wrote:

Serjojeee wrote:

Sailor Blue wrote:

There was an extensive discussion about parabolic reflectors only a month ago. You should take the time to read through it.

DPReview - Parabolic softbox/umbrella in practice?

-- hide signature --

Living and loving it in Pattaya, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

Thanks, I've read that already. That was kinda scientific theoretical discussion and I wanted some feedback from users. And as I see there are none of them here)

The PCB PLMs are about as close to a true umbrella type parabolic reflector as you can find. I suggest you ask your question on the PCB Technical Forum.

Paul C. Buff, Inc. Technical Forum

-- hide signature --

Living and loving it in Pattaya, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

PCB umbrellas are not sold in russia, so I'm mostly speaking about broncolor/briese big brothers...

MayaTlab0
MayaTlab0 Senior Member • Posts: 2,362
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

Serjojeee wrote:

Sailor Blue wrote:

Serjojeee wrote:

Sailor Blue wrote:

There was an extensive discussion about parabolic reflectors only a month ago. You should take the time to read through it.

DPReview - Parabolic softbox/umbrella in practice?

-- hide signature --

Living and loving it in Pattaya, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

Thanks, I've read that already. That was kinda scientific theoretical discussion and I wanted some feedback from users. And as I see there are none of them here)

The PCB PLMs are about as close to a true umbrella type parabolic reflector as you can find. I suggest you ask your question on the PCB Technical Forum.

Paul C. Buff, Inc. Technical Forum

-- hide signature --

Living and loving it in Pattaya, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

PCB umbrellas are not sold in russia, so I'm mostly speaking about broncolor/briese big brothers...

Walimex imports PCB products to Europe, but it is a distribution channel that isn't officially recognised by PCB. They don't ship to Russia, but perhaps them being in the EU could help for importation. You can also use freight forwarders, but the whole process is a major PITA.

But anyway the soft silver PLM is quite a different animal from current deep silver umbrellas, if only because of the material used. Light quality is quite different honestly.

The extreme silver is more comparable, but is no longer manufactured. Another alternative : Cotswoldphoto, on Ebay. But they no longer ship to France, so I don't know if they do to Russia. Cactus silver umbrellas and Phottix para-pro umbrellas shift WB too much to be recommended IMO.

In general pseudo-parabolic umbrellas are a dying breed. PCB used to sell six models (3 sizes in 2 materials), now down to 2 only (in 1 material, soft silver), and no one else has copied them quite as excellently. So IMO it's a good idea to prepare for their eventual extinction and find appropriate solutions with deep silver umbrellas :D.

Broncolor / Briese modifiers are a completely different class of modifiers for various reasons. Personally I don't call them umbrellas, but opinions differ on the correct terminology. Way more versatile than cheap umbrellas, a lot more useful in their defocused positions, way better build quality, a lot heavier, more setup-heavy.

Hi there!

Who regularly use parabolic reflectors and umbrellas in the studio?

There is debate regarding if a PCB PLM soft silver can be called parabolic, as its material scatters light a little bit, but that's what I use most of the time. I don't have (yet) a studio but don't shoot much in exteriors as well.

What's your setup - are you using them mostly as one light, or main light,

Both. Very often as one light, with reflectors. One of the reasons I like materials that scatter light a little bit with these modifiers is that they provide a bit more light to the sides for reflectors to actually work.

at a distance or close enough to the model?

Both. As you probably already know that means changing the strobe to umbrella distance as subject to umbrella distance changes.

How are you dealing with the spill

With... *rolling drums* a spill kill reflector (if applicable - since I use Profoto's lights with a recessed tube it isn't required most of the time) !

, a hotspot, if you bring your umbrellas to the studio? Here in SPb studios mostly use Hensel and Profoto monoblocks. My profoto copy deep umbrellas prefer deep mount in the Hensel for it's open flash tube design but spill is a problem in colored rooms.

If you want to both light the outside of a deep silver umbrella by shoving a flash head with a reasonably exposed flash tube close to the sliding runner (which actually doesn't even work with most deep silver umbrellas, except the larger ones), and kill bare flash tube spill, it isn't exactly easy, isn't it ? Most brands' umbrella / spill kill reflectors were designed for the sort of umbrellas available decades ago, not the more modern breed of 16-sided ones with fibreglass rods. One of the many reasons why I'm very critical of the deep silver umbrella concept. Have you tried using a bit of cinefoil ?

Broncolor heads on their own paras have a similar problem. In some positions you can have a bit of bare flash tube side spill. It's less a problem with Profoto's Pro / Acute heads because of the mount. When assisting I've seen or used several solutions if that proved a problem (not that often as usually Broncolor para = big studio and packs with plenty of power to spare). One of them was to flag the flash tube just right with cinefoil.

Not mentioned here so far is how these modifiers interact with diffusion covers. It's a combo I frequently use with the soft silver PLM as it behaves pretty much like an octabox, only more efficient (since only one diffusion layer is required to evenly light it).

PCB PLM + diffusion cover

OP Serjojeee Regular Member • Posts: 363
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

MayaTlab0 wrote:

Serjojeee wrote:

Sailor Blue wrote:

Serjojeee wrote:

Sailor Blue wrote:

There was an extensive discussion about parabolic reflectors only a month ago. You should take the time to read through it.

DPReview - Parabolic softbox/umbrella in practice?

-- hide signature --

Living and loving it in Pattaya, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

Thanks, I've read that already. That was kinda scientific theoretical discussion and I wanted some feedback from users. And as I see there are none of them here)

The PCB PLMs are about as close to a true umbrella type parabolic reflector as you can find. I suggest you ask your question on the PCB Technical Forum.

Paul C. Buff, Inc. Technical Forum

-- hide signature --

Living and loving it in Pattaya, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

PCB umbrellas are not sold in russia, so I'm mostly speaking about broncolor/briese big brothers...

Walimex imports PCB products to Europe, but it is a distribution channel that isn't officially recognised by PCB. They don't ship to Russia, but perhaps them being in the EU could help for importation. You can also use freight forwarders, but the whole process is a major PITA.

But anyway the soft silver PLM is quite a different animal from current deep silver umbrellas, if only because of the material used. Light quality is quite different honestly.

The extreme silver is more comparable, but is no longer manufactured. Another alternative : Cotswoldphoto, on Ebay. But they no longer ship to France, so I don't know if they do to Russia. Cactus silver umbrellas and Phottix para-pro umbrellas shift WB too much to be recommended IMO.

In general pseudo-parabolic umbrellas are a dying breed. PCB used to sell six models (3 sizes in 2 materials), now down to 2 only (in 1 material, soft silver), and no one else has copied them quite as excellently. So IMO it's a good idea to prepare for their eventual extinction and find appropriate solutions with deep silver umbrellas :D.

Broncolor / Briese modifiers are a completely different class of modifiers for various reasons. Personally I don't call them umbrellas, but opinions differ on the correct terminology. Way more versatile than cheap umbrellas, a lot more useful in their defocused positions, way better build quality, a lot heavier, more setup-heavy.

Hi there!

Who regularly use parabolic reflectors and umbrellas in the studio?

There is debate regarding if a PCB PLM soft silver can be called parabolic, as its material scatters light a little bit, but that's what I use most of the time. I don't have (yet) a studio but don't shoot much in exteriors as well.

What's your setup - are you using them mostly as one light, or main light,

Both. Very often as one light, with reflectors. One of the reasons I like materials that scatter light a little bit with these modifiers is that they provide a bit more light to the sides for reflectors to actually work.

at a distance or close enough to the model?

Both. As you probably already know that means changing the strobe to umbrella distance as subject to umbrella distance changes.

How are you dealing with the spill

With... *rolling drums* a spill kill reflector (if applicable - since I use Profoto's lights with a recessed tube it isn't required most of the time) !

, a hotspot, if you bring your umbrellas to the studio? Here in SPb studios mostly use Hensel and Profoto monoblocks. My profoto copy deep umbrellas prefer deep mount in the Hensel for it's open flash tube design but spill is a problem in colored rooms.

If you want to both light the outside of a deep silver umbrella by shoving a flash head with a reasonably exposed flash tube close to the sliding runner, and kill bare flash tube spill, it isn't exactly easy, isn't it ? Most brands' umbrella / spill kill reflectors were designed for the sort of umbrellas available decades ago, not the more modern breed of 16-sided ones with fibreglass rods. One of the many reasons why I'm very critical of the deep silver umbrella concept. Have you tried using a bit of cinefoil ?

Broncolor heads on their own paras have a similar problem. In some positions you can have a bit of bare flash tube side spill. It's less a problem with Profoto's Pro / Acute heads because of the mount. When assisting I've seen or used several solutions if that proved a problem (not that often as usually Broncolor para = big studio and packs with plenty of power to spare). One of them was to flag the flash tube just right with cinefoil.

Not mentioned here so far is how these modifiers interact with diffusion covers. It's a combo I frequently use with the soft silver PLM as it behaves pretty much like an octabox, only more efficient (since only one diffusion layer is required to evenly light it).

PCB PLM + diffusion cover

There are numerous silver parabolic imported from China. None of them are using soft silver material. And my copy of profoto deep silver 51" is giving me nice light with open tube as close to the ribs as possible. Deep mount kills most of the spill and the inner part of the umbrella is defocused in this position. So it's something like Broncoloc 133 para in defocused position. And I'm starting to think that I need 65" for full body work. And I think that I should move to better studios with Broncolor paras to test them ) So here I'm mostly for some tips from users. Thanks for your reply! And imho true parabolic reflectors are too hard for photography - both briese and broncolor are scattering the light very much, from true parabolic reflector you'll see the light only from one point of the reflector and both of those are not even close to that. Therefore I don't care about the naming but care for the light quality.

MayaTlab0
MayaTlab0 Senior Member • Posts: 2,362
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio
2

Serjojeee wrote:

imho true parabolic reflectors are too hard for photography

Even the sort of silver material used with most deep silver umbrellas is too extreme / hard / reflective for me.

Adorama has recently released a new lineup of deep umbrellas, this time in four materials, one of which is beaded silver :

https://www.adorama.com/gluel41s.html

I haven't tried it, but top marks to Adorama for understanding the value of proposing silver umbrellas in various fabrics.

OP Serjojeee Regular Member • Posts: 363
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

MayaTlab0 wrote:

Serjojeee wrote:

imho true parabolic reflectors are too hard for photography

Even the sort of silver material used with most deep silver umbrellas is too extreme / hard / reflective for me.

Adorama has recently released a new lineup of deep umbrellas, this time in four materials, one of which is beaded silver :

https://www.adorama.com/gluel41s.html

I haven't tried it, but top marks to Adorama for understanding the value of proposing silver umbrellas in various fabrics.

This one I saw somewhere - it's a really nice instrument I assume... Hopefully Chinese will reverse engineer it )) My copy is not super reflective and is made of ripstop nylon based fabric. The bycicle weel shadows are not too pronounced.

Lykato New Member • Posts: 2
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

MayaTlab0,

Thank you for providing a good insight on the parabolic softbox. Could you provide your thoughts on these two parabolic umbrellas. Any of your valuable insight would greatly be appreciated.

1. SMDV Speedbox mega 160

https://www.legiophoto.com/products/smdv-speedbox-mega-reflector-softbox?variant=927257493519

2. Parabolix 35 deep or 45

https://www.parabolixlight.com/parabolix-35-deep

https://www.parabolixlight.com/parabolix45

MayaTlab0
MayaTlab0 Senior Member • Posts: 2,362
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

Lykato wrote:

Could you provide your thoughts on these two parabolic umbrellas.

Not much as I haven't tried them. But both seem to actually be trying to be parabolic modifiers, which is already a good start.

OP Serjojeee Regular Member • Posts: 363
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

MayaTlab0 wrote:

Lykato wrote:

Could you provide your thoughts on these two parabolic umbrellas.

Not much as I haven't tried them. But both seem to actually be trying to be parabolic modifiers, which is already a good start.

Look at last Briese reflectors - they are not true parabolic. They are close in shape to profoto deep umbrellas. True parabolic reflectors have a hotspot and it's not that big, unless it's a Briese 330. Therefore imho for not that big modifier you'd better use something in a not true parabolic form cause the hotspot is not so pronounced. Or you will be using it in defocused position mostly and in that form it's quite another story. I think it's a good idea to test them as rent modifier at studio first and then look if the quality of light suits you.

RE Alpha
RE Alpha Regular Member • Posts: 358
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

There are numerous silver parabolic imported from China. None of them are using soft silver material. And my copy of profoto deep silver 51" is giving me nice light with open tube as close to the ribs as possible. Deep mount kills most of the spill and the inner part of the umbrella is defocused in this position. So it's something like Broncoloc 133 para in defocused position. And I'm starting to think that I need 65" for full body work. And I think that I should move to better studios with Broncolor paras to test them ) So here I'm mostly for some tips from users. Thanks for your reply! And imho true parabolic reflectors are too hard for photography - both briese and broncolor are scattering the light very much, from true parabolic reflector you'll see the light only from one point of the reflector and both of those are not even close to that. Therefore I don't care about the naming but care for the light quality.

I am looking into the para options for Broncolor (I now use the Siros L). As I regularly travel to locations, it also has to be portable (sort of), which limits the choice to the para 88 and 133 (both can used with the Siros L).

Maybe have a look at the following video by Karl Taylor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NrNpQlabnE

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sts2
sts2 Contributing Member • Posts: 806
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

RE Alpha wrote:

There are numerous silver parabolic imported from China. None of them are using soft silver material. And my copy of profoto deep silver 51" is giving me nice light with open tube as close to the ribs as possible. Deep mount kills most of the spill and the inner part of the umbrella is defocused in this position. So it's something like Broncoloc 133 para in defocused position. And I'm starting to think that I need 65" for full body work. And I think that I should move to better studios with Broncolor paras to test them ) So here I'm mostly for some tips from users. Thanks for your reply! And imho true parabolic reflectors are too hard for photography - both briese and broncolor are scattering the light very much, from true parabolic reflector you'll see the light only from one point of the reflector and both of those are not even close to that. Therefore I don't care about the naming but care for the light quality.

I am looking into the para options for Broncolor (I now use the Siros L). As I regularly travel to locations, it also has to be portable (sort of), which limits the choice to the para 88 and 133 (both can used with the Siros L).

Maybe have a look at the following video by Karl Taylor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NrNpQlabnE

I can share my experience with you, as I have both. The 88 is really a headshot modifier. The 133 is obviously larger and suited for more than just portraits. You could do full body, but it's actually a bit small for that as well so you'll get falloff. It's also easier to get the distinctive Para catchlight (with the black centre) with the 133 and Siros. The 88 takes up a lot less volume in total so it's more feasible in small spaces.

With a Siros L (especially 800), expect to use a really sturdy tripod, preferably with casters, as they get very front-heavy in the defocused position (especially the 133 because it extends further). The focusing rod is extremely strong and can carry the weight just fine, but it's just all hanging out in front. For this reason I use it with a Move/MobiLED 95% of the time, instead of a Siros.

Final tip, which you won't get anywhere else: you cannot mount either 88 or 133 to the Siros as a "reflector" (without the focusing rod). You can on every other broncolor head, but the Siros body doesn't fit inside the Para flange for direct mounting.

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www.barbellphotography.com

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eyeport
eyeport Regular Member • Posts: 348
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

Oh I love my Para, but so my other modifiers. I think I can just grab any of them and shoot. It's like food. Eating just one type makes you sick. ; )

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Regards,
Felix Wu
www.felix-wu.com | Instagram.com/creationheart

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RE Alpha
RE Alpha Regular Member • Posts: 358
Re: Parabolic reflectors in the studio

sts2 wrote:

RE Alpha wrote

I am looking into the para options for Broncolor (I now use the Siros L). As I regularly travel to locations, it also has to be portable (sort of), which limits the choice to the para 88 and 133 (both can used with the Siros L).

Maybe have a look at the following video by Karl Taylor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NrNpQlabnE

I can share my experience with you, as I have both. The 88 is really a headshot modifier. The 133 is obviously larger and suited for more than just portraits. You could do full body, but it's actually a bit small for that as well so you'll get falloff. It's also easier to get the distinctive Para catchlight (with the black centre) with the 133 and Siros. The 88 takes up a lot less volume in total so it's more feasible in small spaces.

With a Siros L (especially 800), expect to use a really sturdy tripod, preferably with casters, as they get very front-heavy in the defocused position (especially the 133 because it extends further). The focusing rod is extremely strong and can carry the weight just fine, but it's just all hanging out in front. For this reason I use it with a Move/MobiLED 95% of the time, instead of a Siros.

Final tip, which you won't get anywhere else: you cannot mount either 88 or 133 to the Siros as a "reflector" (without the focusing rod). You can on every other broncolor head, but the Siros body doesn't fit inside the Para flange for direct mounting.

-- hide signature --

www.barbellphotography.com

Many thanks for the tips Karim. Indeed I can see the Para 88 & 133 to become quite front heavy with the Siros on one of your photos on your website. Could to know that to ensure it is balanced properly.

 RE Alpha's gear list:RE Alpha's gear list
Sony Alpha DSLR-A900 Sony Alpha a7R II Sony a9 Sony Alpha a7R III Sony 24-70mm F2.8 ZA SSM Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* +9 more
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