Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!

Started Jan 18, 2018 | Discussions
fPrime
fPrime Senior Member • Posts: 2,584
Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!
14

Luminous Landscape recently visited Phase One to learn about their medium format trichromatic sensor. They produced two epic videos that are worth watching for anyone with an interest in getting better color from digital cameras.

https://luminous-landscape.com/phase-one-trichromatic-sensor-explained/

In a fascinating video interview with Lau Norgaard, VP of R&D at Phase One, several contentious forum topics were simultaneously settled at the OEM level. I've marked these at their various time stamps:

  • 1:40 - Sensor CFA designs have color trade-offs that leave color quirks.
  • 6:30 - Manufacturer's have weakened CFA's in modern cameras to achieve higher ISO at the expense of color fidelity. Colors today are less pure.
  • 8:30 - Irregular CFA color channel crossover (for example, the red channel seeing deep into the blue channel) is difficult to mathematically model leading to magenta casts in skies and more pronounced purple fringing.
  • 11:30 - The more that the R, G, and B channels from a CFA are equally balanced, the less noisy the sensor becomes.
  • 16:00 - The denser the CFA is, the lower base ISO it can achieve (e.g. ISO 35)
  • 17:52 - The less aggressive the color transform is, the cleaner the files remain, and the more processing headroom is reserved for creative post processing.
  • 19:52 - The fallacy of using color checker profiles... they can't offset a strong CFA.
  • 22:50 - The fallacy of fixing colors in post processing... tweaking incorrect colors pulls neighboring hues out of shape.

I've debated all of these points on DPR over the last several years citing industry references, CFA spectrograms, and image examples. You will see many of these same points raised in my posts on the problem with weakened CFA's, CCD vs. CMOS, and the generally poorer color accuracy (SMI) of modern cameras. As such I personally found a lot of validation in Lau's comments. Had Luminous Landscape interviewed me on the topic my responses would have been the same.

All this being said, you will also see that Phase One has partnered with Sony to build a very strong, trichromatic sensor for their new medium format digital back. Their aim is to produce color fidelity the way our eyes see color. There is absolutely no reason why Nikon, Canon, or Sony themselves can't produce a full frame sensor with an equally strong CFA.

I believe there is still a market for great color fidelity at every sensor size. Certainly we need good color at every resolution. At this point it's more questionable whether we actually need more resolution, IMHO.

fPrime

 fPrime's gear list:fPrime's gear list
Nikon D700 Nikon D200 Canon EOS 5D Nikon D1X Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro
David Pavlich
David Pavlich Senior Member • Posts: 3,598
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!
4

fPrime wrote:

Luminous Landscape recently visited Phase One to learn about their medium format trichromatic sensor. They produced two epic videos that are worth watching for anyone with an interest in getting better color from digital cameras.

https://luminous-landscape.com/phase-one-trichromatic-sensor-explained/

In a fascinating video interview with Lau Norgaard, VP of R&D at Phase One, several contentious forum topics were simultaneously settled at the OEM level. I've marked these at their various time stamps:

  • 1:40 - Sensor CFA designs have color trade-offs that leave color quirks.
  • 6:30 - Manufacturer's have weakened CFA's in modern cameras to achieve higher ISO at the expense of color fidelity. Colors today are less pure.
  • 8:30 - Irregular CFA color channel crossover (for example, the red channel seeing deep into the blue channel) is difficult to mathematically model leading to magenta casts in skies and more pronounced purple fringing.
  • 11:30 - The more that the R, G, and B channels from a CFA are equally balanced, the less noisy the sensor becomes.
  • 16:00 - The denser the CFA is, the lower base ISO it can achieve (e.g. ISO 35)
  • 17:52 - The less aggressive the color transform is, the cleaner the files remain, and the more processing headroom is reserved for creative post processing.
  • 19:52 - The fallacy of using color checker profiles... they can't offset a strong CFA.
  • 22:50 - The fallacy of fixing colors in post processing... tweaking incorrect colors pulls neighboring hues out of shape.

I've debated all of these points on DPR over the last several years citing industry references, CFA spectrograms, and image examples. You will see many of these same points raised in my posts on the problem with weakened CFA's, CCD vs. CMOS, and the generally poorer color accuracy (SMI) of modern cameras. As such I personally found a lot of validation in Lau's comments. Had Luminous Landscape interviewed me on the topic my responses would have been the same.

All this being said, you will also see that Phase One has partnered with Sony to build a very strong, trichromatic sensor for their new medium format digital back. Their aim is to produce color fidelity the way our eyes see color. There is absolutely no reason why Nikon, Canon, or Sony themselves can't produce a full frame sensor with an equally strong CFA.

I believe there is still a market for great color fidelity at every sensor size. Certainly we need good color at every resolution. At this point it's more questionable whether we actually need more resolution, IMHO.

fPrime

If, say, Canon came out with a 5DsT (T for trichromatic) with great color, but the sensor is so spendy that they want $9000 US, would you buy it?  How many would buy it?  How many buy $49,000 Phase One cameras?  What is it that you shoot that requires this sort of accuracy and how much are you willing to pay?  Would Canon's current lens lineup be able to take advantage of such a sensor or would Canon have to make even better lenses?

I have no intention of doing any sort of research because I'm happy with the color that I get from my P800 from shots taken by my dinosaur 5DIII.  But your post certain piqued my interest in that sort of uber sensor.

David

-- hide signature --

"The world doesn't need you...." Gene Simmons
Viewbug: https://www.viewbug.com/member/David_Pavlich

 David Pavlich's gear list:David Pavlich's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F4L IS USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM Tamron SP 35mm F1.8 Di VC USD Sigma 100-400mm F5-6.3 +1 more
fPrime
OP fPrime Senior Member • Posts: 2,584
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!
4

David Pavlich wrote:

If, say, Canon came out with a 5DsT (T for trichromatic) with great color, but the sensor is so spendy that they want $9000 US, would you buy it? How many would buy it? How many buy $49,000 Phase One cameras?

Great point, I think the answer is no, I wouldn't spend $9,000 and certainly not $49,000. But that perhaps is why I'm suggesting we need a full frame version... denser, trichromatic CFA's cost nothing more to make. Manufacturer's should be able to price them for the $1500-$3000 full frame market.

What is it that you shoot that requires this sort of accuracy and how much are you willing to pay?

Skin tones and landscapes both could benefit immensely... as well as shooting anything under different or incomplete illuminants as strong CFA's play better than weak CFA's in any kind of lighting.

Would Canon's current lens lineup be able to take advantage of such a sensor or would Canon have to make even better lenses?

That's the beauty, no! Trichromatic sensors actually make current lenses perform better in the sense that their purple fringing is less pronounced. Love it!

I have no intention of doing any sort of research because I'm happy with the color that I get from my P800 from shots taken by my dinosaur 5DIII. But your post certain piqued my interest in that sort of uber sensor.

Thanks, David.

fPrime

 fPrime's gear list:fPrime's gear list
Nikon D700 Nikon D200 Canon EOS 5D Nikon D1X Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro
sportyaccordy Forum Pro • Posts: 12,686
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!
2

*camera comes out*

Why are full frame trichomatic cameras so expensive??!?!?

-- hide signature --

Sometimes I take pictures with my gear- https://www.flickr.com/photos/41601371@N00/

 sportyaccordy's gear list:sportyaccordy's gear list
NEX-5T Sony a7R II Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Rokinon AF 50mm F1.4 FE Samyang 14mm F2.8 IF ED MC Aspherical +6 more
fPrime
OP fPrime Senior Member • Posts: 2,584
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!
4

sportyaccordy wrote:

*camera comes out*

Why are full frame trichomatic cameras so expensive??!?!?

Trichromatic sensors for medium format manufacturer's are probably expensive because the market itself is a niche with extremely small volumes.  They needn't be expensive at the typical full frame volume size of a Canon, Nikon, or Sony.

fPrime

 fPrime's gear list:fPrime's gear list
Nikon D700 Nikon D200 Canon EOS 5D Nikon D1X Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro
David Pavlich
David Pavlich Senior Member • Posts: 3,598
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!

Another question; would current firmware used by Canon and Nikon have to be altered in any way and would that be minor tweaks or major rewrites?  I ask because this adds to cost.

Your comment about reduced fringing makes good sense, but as we've seen with the high MP sensors currently used in FF cameras how they are pushing the current lenses to their limit in resolving detail on those tiny pixels.  Will the resolution potential of the new sensor make, say, Canon's L lens inadequate?

David

-- hide signature --

"The world doesn't need you...." Gene Simmons
Viewbug: https://www.viewbug.com/member/David_Pavlich

 David Pavlich's gear list:David Pavlich's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV Canon EF 16-35mm F4L IS USM Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8L IS II USM Tamron SP 35mm F1.8 Di VC USD Sigma 100-400mm F5-6.3 +1 more
Iliah Borg Forum Pro • Posts: 24,906
Trichromatic vs Standard: a 3-part study
14

Jack Hogan studied this in a thorough way:

Phase One IQ3 100MP Trichromatic vs Standard Back Linear Color

Part I, claims, contradictions, and sense

http://www.strollswithmydog.com/phase-one-iq3-100mp-trichromatic-linear-color-i

Part II, colour accuracy

http://www.strollswithmydog.com/phase-one-iq3-100mp-trichromatic-linear-color-ii

Part III, quantitative results:

http://www.strollswithmydog.com/phase-one-iq3-100mp-trichromatic-linear-color-iii

-- hide signature --
fPrime
OP fPrime Senior Member • Posts: 2,584
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!

David Pavlich wrote:

Another question; would current firmware used by Canon and Nikon have to be altered in any way and would that be minor tweaks or major rewrites? I ask because this adds to cost.

Your comment about reduced fringing makes good sense, but as we've seen with the high MP sensors currently used in FF cameras how they are pushing the current lenses to their limit in resolving detail on those tiny pixels. Will the resolution potential of the new sensor make, say, Canon's L lens inadequate?

I don't think so, the trichromatic sensor seems to perform better than a classic sensor with regard to most lens limitations.  Have you watched the second video with image comparison from Neils?  He's got some examples of lens color casts being reduced by trichromatic design as well as lower purple fringing.

fPrime

 fPrime's gear list:fPrime's gear list
Nikon D700 Nikon D200 Canon EOS 5D Nikon D1X Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro
D Cox Forum Pro • Posts: 21,827
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!

However, it is still a colour mosaic. What they are doing is refining the three filters.

fPrime
OP fPrime Senior Member • Posts: 2,584
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!

D Cox wrote:

However, it is still a colour mosaic. What they are doing is refining the three filters.

Exactly, that's what makes it so brilliant! It adds no material cost to a Bayer sensor and yet it deprives no technology from the underlying pixel wells. So we can get our BSI sensitivity boost and CMOS amplification for high ISO alongside full trichromatic color.

fPrime

 fPrime's gear list:fPrime's gear list
Nikon D700 Nikon D200 Canon EOS 5D Nikon D1X Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro
primeshooter
primeshooter Veteran Member • Posts: 4,884
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!
3

fPrime wrote:

Luminous Landscape recently visited Phase One to learn about their medium format trichromatic sensor. They produced two epic videos that are worth watching for anyone with an interest in getting better color from digital cameras.

https://luminous-landscape.com/phase-one-trichromatic-sensor-explained/

In a fascinating video interview with Lau Norgaard, VP of R&D at Phase One, several contentious forum topics were simultaneously settled at the OEM level. I've marked these at their various time stamps:

  • 1:40 - Sensor CFA designs have color trade-offs that leave color quirks.
  • 6:30 - Manufacturer's have weakened CFA's in modern cameras to achieve higher ISO at the expense of color fidelity. Colors today are less pure.
  • 8:30 - Irregular CFA color channel crossover (for example, the red channel seeing deep into the blue channel) is difficult to mathematically model leading to magenta casts in skies and more pronounced purple fringing.
  • 11:30 - The more that the R, G, and B channels from a CFA are equally balanced, the less noisy the sensor becomes.
  • 16:00 - The denser the CFA is, the lower base ISO it can achieve (e.g. ISO 35)
  • 17:52 - The less aggressive the color transform is, the cleaner the files remain, and the more processing headroom is reserved for creative post processing.
  • 19:52 - The fallacy of using color checker profiles... they can't offset a strong CFA.
  • 22:50 - The fallacy of fixing colors in post processing... tweaking incorrect colors pulls neighboring hues out of shape.

I've debated all of these points on DPR over the last several years citing industry references, CFA spectrograms, and image examples. You will see many of these same points raised in my posts on the problem with weakened CFA's, CCD vs. CMOS, and the generally poorer color accuracy (SMI) of modern cameras. As such I personally found a lot of validation in Lau's comments. Had Luminous Landscape interviewed me on the topic my responses would have been the same.

All this being said, you will also see that Phase One has partnered with Sony to build a very strong, trichromatic sensor for their new medium format digital back. Their aim is to produce color fidelity the way our eyes see color. There is absolutely no reason why Nikon, Canon, or Sony themselves can't produce a full frame sensor with an equally strong CFA.

I believe there is still a market for great color fidelity at every sensor size. Certainly we need good color at every resolution. At this point it's more questionable whether we actually need more resolution, IMHO.

fPrime

Really enjoyed watching thanks for posting this. I've always accepted there are tradeoffs with sensors, as per Norgaard in the video explains, I learned a lot listening to him. It appears that you where certainly on to something on here.

Leonard Migliore
Leonard Migliore Forum Pro • Posts: 16,454
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!

fPrime wrote:

Luminous Landscape recently visited Phase One to learn about their medium format trichromatic sensor. They produced two epic videos that are worth watching for anyone with an interest in getting better color from digital cameras.

https://luminous-landscape.com/phase-one-trichromatic-sensor-explained/

In a fascinating video interview with Lau Norgaard, VP of R&D at Phase One, several contentious forum topics were simultaneously settled at the OEM level. I've marked these at their various time stamps:

  • 1:40 - Sensor CFA designs have color trade-offs that leave color quirks.
  • 6:30 - Manufacturer's have weakened CFA's in modern cameras to achieve higher ISO at the expense of color fidelity. Colors today are less pure.
  • 8:30 - Irregular CFA color channel crossover (for example, the red channel seeing deep into the blue channel) is difficult to mathematically model leading to magenta casts in skies and more pronounced purple fringing.
  • 11:30 - The more that the R, G, and B channels from a CFA are equally balanced, the less noisy the sensor becomes.
  • 16:00 - The denser the CFA is, the lower base ISO it can achieve (e.g. ISO 35)
  • 17:52 - The less aggressive the color transform is, the cleaner the files remain, and the more processing headroom is reserved for creative post processing.
  • 19:52 - The fallacy of using color checker profiles... they can't offset a strong CFA.
  • 22:50 - The fallacy of fixing colors in post processing... tweaking incorrect colors pulls neighboring hues out of shape.

I've debated all of these points on DPR over the last several years citing industry references, CFA spectrograms, and image examples. You will see many of these same points raised in my posts on the problem with weakened CFA's, CCD vs. CMOS, and the generally poorer color accuracy (SMI) of modern cameras. As such I personally found a lot of validation in Lau's comments. Had Luminous Landscape interviewed me on the topic my responses would have been the same.

All this being said, you will also see that Phase One has partnered with Sony to build a very strong, trichromatic sensor for their new medium format digital back. Their aim is to produce color fidelity the way our eyes see color. There is absolutely no reason why Nikon, Canon, or Sony themselves can't produce a full frame sensor with an equally strong CFA.

I believe there is still a market for great color fidelity at every sensor size. Certainly we need good color at every resolution. At this point it's more questionable whether we actually need more resolution, IMHO.

Very interesting and, as you say, worth watching. Thanks for the link.

There's one area where I really wish I had a trichromatic CFA and that's art copy. Every camera I've used has exhibited metamerism and I have to correct each picture even after doing a profile. The Canon 50D was very close but there was always one or two colors that were off.

The sky and grass colors on landscapes looked impressive too but I think you can get close enough with normal CFA's. It is, however, better to have the colors right in the first place.

-- hide signature --

Leonard Migliore

 Leonard Migliore's gear list:Leonard Migliore's gear list
Canon PowerShot G12 Sony RX100 III Nikon D300 Nikon D750 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED +12 more
fPrime
OP fPrime Senior Member • Posts: 2,584
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!

Leonard Migliore wrote:

Very interesting and, as you say, worth watching. Thanks for the link.

There's one area where I really wish I had a trichromatic CFA and that's art copy. Every camera I've used has exhibited metamerism and I have to correct each picture even after doing a profile. The Canon 50D was very close but there was always one or two colors that were off.

Thanks, Leonard. Have you watched the second video with Neil’s? He mentioned that Phase One has developed a profile for ultra-high color definition specifically for art reproduction that takes advantage of its narrower dynamic range. Novel idea!

The sky and grass colors on landscapes looked impressive too but I think you can get close enough with normal CFA's. It is, however, better to have the colors right in the first place.

fPrime

 fPrime's gear list:fPrime's gear list
Nikon D700 Nikon D200 Canon EOS 5D Nikon D1X Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro
Leonard Migliore
Leonard Migliore Forum Pro • Posts: 16,454
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!

fPrime wrote:

Leonard Migliore wrote:

Very interesting and, as you say, worth watching. Thanks for the link.

There's one area where I really wish I had a trichromatic CFA and that's art copy. Every camera I've used has exhibited metamerism and I have to correct each picture even after doing a profile. The Canon 50D was very close but there was always one or two colors that were off.

Thanks, Leonard. Have you watched the second video with Neil’s? He mentioned that Phase One has developed a profile for ultra-high color definition specifically for art reproduction that takes advantage of its narrower dynamic range. Novel idea!

I watched both videos. I suspect that one reason for developing this product was the art copy market. I do not, however, do high-end art copy for profit, so there's no way I'm getting a Phase One back.

-- hide signature --

Leonard Migliore

 Leonard Migliore's gear list:Leonard Migliore's gear list
Canon PowerShot G12 Sony RX100 III Nikon D300 Nikon D750 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED +12 more
Ask Mait Contributing Member • Posts: 714
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!
1

fPrime wrote:

Luminous Landscape recently visited Phase One to learn about their medium format trichromatic sensor. They produced two epic videos that are worth watching for anyone with an interest in getting better color from digital cameras.

https://luminous-landscape.com/phase-one-trichromatic-sensor-explained/

In a fascinating video interview with Lau Norgaard, VP of R&D at Phase One, several contentious forum topics were simultaneously settled at the OEM level. I've marked these at their various time stamps:

  • 1:40 - Sensor CFA designs have color trade-offs that leave color quirks.
  • 6:30 - Manufacturer's have weakened CFA's in modern cameras to achieve higher ISO at the expense of color fidelity. Colors today are less pure.
  • 8:30 - Irregular CFA color channel crossover (for example, the red channel seeing deep into the blue channel) is difficult to mathematically model leading to magenta casts in skies and more pronounced purple fringing.
  • 11:30 - The more that the R, G, and B channels from a CFA are equally balanced, the less noisy the sensor becomes.
  • 16:00 - The denser the CFA is, the lower base ISO it can achieve (e.g. ISO 35)
  • 17:52 - The less aggressive the color transform is, the cleaner the files remain, and the more processing headroom is reserved for creative post processing.
  • 19:52 - The fallacy of using color checker profiles... they can't offset a strong CFA.
  • 22:50 - The fallacy of fixing colors in post processing... tweaking incorrect colors pulls neighboring hues out of shape.

I've debated all of these points on DPR over the last several years citing industry references, CFA spectrograms, and image examples. You will see many of these same points raised in my posts on the problem with weakened CFA's, CCD vs. CMOS, and the generally poorer color accuracy (SMI) of modern cameras. As such I personally found a lot of validation in Lau's comments. Had Luminous Landscape interviewed me on the topic my responses would have been the same.

All this being said, you will also see that Phase One has partnered with Sony to build a very strong, trichromatic sensor for their new medium format digital back. Their aim is to produce color fidelity the way our eyes see color. There is absolutely no reason why Nikon, Canon, or Sony themselves can't produce a full frame sensor with an equally strong CFA.

I believe there is still a market for great color fidelity at every sensor size. Certainly we need good color at every resolution. At this point it's more questionable whether we actually need more resolution, IMHO.

fPrime

Many thanks for bringing this to my knowledge.. Yes, I am convinced with the views expressed and hope to find my future camera to have this design.

fishy wishy
fishy wishy Veteran Member • Posts: 8,986
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!
1

I'm eagerly awaiting someone in some kind of software image processing to tell us and Phase One we didn't present enough numbers and methodology and we can assume therefore that an obscure software programmer really holds the cards rather than massive camera companies who've been in the game for decades. We'll have to consider ourselves lucky if we escape plain abuse for being stupid and knowing nothing. Even though it's Phase One talking this time.

primeshooter
primeshooter Veteran Member • Posts: 4,884
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!
1

fishy wishy wrote:

I'm eagerly awaiting someone in some kind of software image processing to tell us and Phase One we didn't present enough numbers and methodology and we can assume therefore that an obscure software programmer really holds the cards rather than massive camera companies who've been in the game for decades. We'll have to consider ourselves lucky if we escape plain abuse for being stupid and knowing nothing. Even though it's Phase One talking this time.

Scroll up...it has already happened.

Aaron801 Veteran Member • Posts: 5,424
I don't...
1

... typically look at photos made with contemporary cameras and think, "those colors are terrible!" Mostly I think that the color rendition with today's tech is very good. I don't really believe that photography as a whole will improve when sensors evolve to a point where the color accuracy is a bit more like what the human eye perceives. Funny how so many folks get excited about the colors of different film stocks (enough to where there are presets to imitate these things with software) and those colors tend to be less realistic than what current digital can do.

Sharpness, dynamic range and a reasonable level of color fidelity are nice to have, I think, but perfect realism is never going to be a prerequisite for great photography... If I want what looks perfectly real, I'll just check it out with my own eyes, not by looking at a photo...

-- hide signature --

my flickr:
www.flickr.com/photos/128435329@N08/

 Aaron801's gear list:Aaron801's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M10 Panasonic Leica Summilux DG 25mm F1.4 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 45-150mm F4-5.6 ASPH Mega OIS Panasonic 12-60mm F3.5-5.6 OIS
J A C S
J A C S Forum Pro • Posts: 12,856
Re: Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already!
1

Some of those statements are oversimplifications. On the other hand, there is a religious belief here that with profiling and sliders, all sensors give the same color, which is wrong. Also, color is too much photography related to be of interest to most of our forum members. Not like DR.

<end of mini-rant>

Jack Hogan Veteran Member • Posts: 6,703
Give me a full frame trichromatic sensor already?
9

fPrime wrote:

In a fascinating video interview with Lau Norgaard, VP of R&D at Phase One, several contentious forum topics were simultaneously settled at the OEM level. I've marked these at their various time stamps:

Lots of good stuff there but also a fair amount of chaff and marketing hand waving. Based on my limited playing around with a similar file from both Backs I would say that an oversimplified way to understand the difference in color produced between the two CFAs is to metaphorically consider the difference between Adobe and ProPhoto RGB: Adobe RGB with its denser space is represented by the Trichromatic while ProPhoto by the Standard Back. For the reasoning behind that metaphor you can refer to the articles linked to by an earlier post.

I've debated all of these points on DPR over the last several years citing industry references, CFA spectrograms, and image examples. You will see many of these same points raised in my posts on the problem with weakened CFA's, CCD vs. CMOS, and the generally poorer color accuracy (SMI) of modern cameras.

Except that the CFA changes implemented in the Trichromatic appear to directly contradict those conclusions: in my limited investigation, the Trichromatic's CFA may be 'denser' or 'purer' but the Standard Back's linear color is distinctly more 'accurate' out of the box. Compromises, compromises...

If their marketing material is to be believed some have the feeling that some of the changes they brought were actually corrections to mistakes made with color setup in the Standard Back (e.g. was its hot mirror too 'weak', as has been reported?). On other tweaks though I think they moved in the direction of optimizing color for a specific application, trying to answer questions like this: what changes would we make if this camera were always/predominantly used outdoors, indoor performance be darned? The opposite question could be asked as well and different compromises would be reached. Then there is the much larger target market that wants their camera to be setup so that it works well both indoor and outdoors...

So once the compromises are understood I am not sure the average photographer would want a specialized 'sensor' set up like in the Trichromatic for their full frame camera.

Jack

As such I personally found a lot of validation in Lau's comments. Had Luminous Landscape interviewed me on the topic my responses would have been the same.

Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads