#Arkive NZM: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L

Started Nov 21, 2017 | Discussions
nzmacro
nzmacro Forum Pro • Posts: 17,265
#Arkive NZM: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L
23

The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L

On the E-M10. Works well with both m4/3 and APS-C. One day I might give FF a shot or two with it. I prefer crop factor sensors though. Push pull zoom this one and I prefer that for manual focus.

Very sharp versatile lens without any CA that I've seen. Fluorite element and a UD element. My only gripe with the lens is that it's very light in weight. Prefer heavier lenses for weight stability, just a personal thing. IBIS could be very handy with this, but it's not something I like using at faster shutter speeds.

So will try a few samples from it.

Dabchick, NZ Grebe with a tadpole.

A very small frog just taking a peak

Dragon head on

coming in

Flying through

Dabchick being a nutter. Heavy crop. Should have used the 500mm. Next time

Taking shots of the two on the right and another couple decided to float on by. Photo bombed

A couple of Damsel's making whoopie on the wing

For shots like that, just track and focus as you go, you will miss a lot, but will also nail quite a few. They look harder than that actually are with Dragons and Damsels in flight. Gentle slow focus movements goes a long way.

.....................................................................

The close focusing range of this lens is excellent for macro and closeups.

So an uncropped shot from a close focus point

Since it was content sitting there I put on a 50mm extension tube to the lens and again, un-cropped

When it enters into the so called macro mode of the lens, it actually focuses fairly close by itself. Add tubes and it's not bad at all.

Now adding a raynox DCR-250 to front and we start to get into the higher ratios

Uncropped with the DCR-250 at around 200mm. Natural light at F/22

On APS-C with a Red admiral butterfly we start getting into a 4:1 ratio with the lens and the raynox DCR-250 Ringflash used

Ringflash used

A very capable combination and always stopped down to F/22 - F/32 using a Sunpack DX- 8R ringflash generally

Being a zoom it's makes for versatile macro setup, more so than a prime

....................................................

Birds

I find 300mm a little short for a BIF lens, so its not used much for BIF's. A firm fluorite element freak this end and it amazing that Canon actually put one in this lens. Again, I've yet to see any CA from this little zoom. At F/5.6 its not the brightest out there, but everything is shot wide open anyway with these shots.

Dabchicks with a chick

White faced Heron on the move

And another

I'm not a writer so expect some spelling and grammar mistakes to say the least

After all these years, it's the only zoom lens I've kept and amazing that Canon saw fit in this lightweight zoom to add a fluorite element and a UD element. Very pleased they did. So if you are after one, pay the extra and get the "L" version, it's worth it IMO.

I'll do a post up on the 300 F/2.8L, 500 F/4.5L and the 800 F/5.6L along the way. Also the Sigma 500 F/4.5 APO. Like I say, just don't expect a writer to be doing it

All the best folks and a recommended lens this one.

Danny.

PS: Any mistakes Tom, feel free to change it.

-- hide signature --

Worry about the image that comes out of the box rather than the box itself
-----------
Birds and BIF's ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/124733969@N06/sets/
The need for speed ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/130646821@N03/albums

Olympus OM-D E-M10
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
Heritage Cameras
Heritage Cameras Senior Member • Posts: 1,785
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L
2

A great lens + fantastic manual focus technique = fabulous shots – congratulations!

-- hide signature --

Dave, HCL

 Heritage Cameras's gear list:Heritage Cameras's gear list
Sony a7
MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 42,378
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L
2

Thanks Danny, I knew I could rely on you to widen our horizons.  More of your usual high standard captures  (= great )

-- hide signature --

Tom Caldwell

Ken Croft Senior Member • Posts: 1,741
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L
1

Does that lens have the strange breach-lock mount like my Canon AE-1 had, or is the FD a more modern-ish mount ?

Having tried your technique using my canon 400/5.6L on my Oly M1, I am even more impressed with your images. I may decide to trash my kit and take up stamp collecting, war gaming or train spotting. (Other hobbies are available).

Ken C

MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 42,378
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L
2

Ken Croft wrote:

Does that lens have the strange breach-lock mount like my Canon AE-1 had, or is the FD a more modern-ish mount ?

My guess is the FDn which is the “new” version of the old FL/FD breach-lock and is fully compatible with it.  The FDn is a bayonet mount with push-butotn release and requires a two position movement to pick up the aperture operating lever when mounting - somewhat baffling when first encountered but as easy as eating pie after the first attempt.  It is possible to somehow manage to mount one of these lenses without hooking up the aperture lever in which case the aperture lever will not work.  Hence the Chinese adapter manufacturers “invention” of the rotating collar/pin on their FD adapters.  But if the collar is not set “on” after mounting then the aperture most likely will not work either.  I personally would prefer a fixed actuating pin and go through the hook up then rotate to fully mount routine that was originally used.

Having tried your technique using my canon 400/5.6L on my Oly M1, I am even more impressed with your images. I may decide to trash my kit and take up stamp collecting, war gaming or train spotting. (Other hobbies are available).

Yes those that see Danny’s images cannot help than be impressed - although revealing his techniques is very helpful we cannot as easily replicate his undoubted skills and patience in achieving these results.

I have given up trying to be a birder - if I see a suitable bird I still might take a pot shot at it but I think that I lack the dedication and acquired intuitive thought processes to back it up. It is a sort of “last frontier” with me as I set out to try and master the skills of different types of photography.  But as an image maker I think that I am more of the artist than the scientist.

Ken C

-- hide signature --

Tom Caldwell

nzmacro
OP nzmacro Forum Pro • Posts: 17,265
FDn Ken

Ken Croft wrote:

Does that lens have the strange breach-lock mount like my Canon AE-1 had, or is the FD a more modern-ish mount ?

Having tried your technique using my canon 400/5.6L on my Oly M1, I am even more impressed with your images. I may decide to trash my kit and take up stamp collecting, war gaming or train spotting. (Other hobbies are available).

Ken C

Howdy Ken and thanks as always, but it gets easier in time mate, I promise.

Tom nailed it with the new FDn twist mount. Nothing wrong with the old breech lock mount though for the older FD. The FL-F 500 F/5.6 uses the FL mount which is very similar to the FD, still fits the same adapters ....

The best engineered lens I've ever owned and that uses the similar breech lock mount. The only thing that changed from the FL to the FD was the aperture pin, but still works fine with the adapters.

I remember back in the 70's with the early Canon breech lock lens mount, it had a spring and when it was pushed onto the camera mount, it turned slightly to lock itself using the spring inside the mount, very clever, but Canon did away with that and just had the turn breech lock in the end.

That FD 100-300 F/5.6L with the fluorite element only came out with the FDn mount Ken.

Hey, all the best Ken and good to see you BTW

Danny.

-- hide signature --

Worry about the image that comes out of the box rather than the box itself
-----------
Birds and BIF's ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/124733969@N06/sets/
The need for speed ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/130646821@N03/albums

nzmacro
OP nzmacro Forum Pro • Posts: 17,265
A few thoughts

Tom Caldwell wrote:

Ken Croft wrote:

Does that lens have the strange breach-lock mount like my Canon AE-1 had, or is the FD a more modern-ish mount ?

My guess is the FDn which is the “new” version of the old FL/FD breach-lock and is fully compatible with it. The FDn is a bayonet mount with push-butotn release and requires a two position movement to pick up the aperture operating lever when mounting - somewhat baffling when first encountered but as easy as eating pie after the first attempt. It is possible to somehow manage to mount one of these lenses without hooking up the aperture lever in which case the aperture lever will not work. Hence the Chinese adapter manufacturers “invention” of the rotating collar/pin on their FD adapters. But if the collar is not set “on” after mounting then the aperture most likely will not work either. I personally would prefer a fixed actuating pin and go through the hook up then rotate to fully mount routine that was originally used.

Having tried your technique using my canon 400/5.6L on my Oly M1, I am even more impressed with your images. I may decide to trash my kit and take up stamp collecting, war gaming or train spotting. (Other hobbies are available).

Yes those that see Danny’s images cannot help than be impressed - although revealing his techniques is very helpful we cannot as easily replicate his undoubted skills and patience in achieving these results.

I have given up trying to be a birder - if I see a suitable bird I still might take a pot shot at it but I think that I lack the dedication and acquired intuitive thought processes to back it up. It is a sort of “last frontier” with me as I set out to try and master the skills of different types of photography. But as an image maker I think that I am more of the artist than the scientist.

Ken C

Bang on with the mount of course Tom.

There's a few reasons why I love MF lenses and you probably know them all anyway by now Tom.

The feel, oh that feel of being more a part of the shot and not relying on a lens moving itself to get the shot. Just a personal thing and a lot in here would feel the same way mate, you included. Maybe we are control freaks after all Tom with photography

The cost. Heck there is no way on this earth I could afford the newer versions let alone the bodies to go with them. So if I want it, there is no choice The divorce settlement would kill me if I did go with those new AF versions.

I can get a 300 F/2.8 and a 500 F/4.5L for less than the cost of an Oly 300 F/4. So the money is far better spent on a decent body, but as we know with MF, we don't exactly need a lot there either. Maybe we are the lucky ones after all.

You gotta be stubborn and patient for sure. You have to be prepared that you won't or can't nail every shot, that's just part of the game even with AF. I think if it became easier, I would give up and take up something else. We need the drive and the challenge gives us that to a large degree. We are a different breed I reckon us MF users.

All the best over the Tassie.

Danny.

-- hide signature --

Worry about the image that comes out of the box rather than the box itself
-----------
Birds and BIF's ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/124733969@N06/sets/
The need for speed ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/130646821@N03/albums

MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 42,378
Re: A few thoughts

I have a few issues of my own - I did buy up big in lenses more than 10 years ago at about the Canon 10D stage.  I have some really outsatnding gear and even the10D made great images fom it. Then I came to the point where my good EF lenses were forever and Canon just kept spinning out dslr body improvements forever.

The old idea of one great film camera kit is only just starting to take hold again.  I can see that some cameras being sold today will still be regarded as great cameras 10 years from now. I gave up on the Canon dslr body churn at the 5D and made it last for nearly 10 years.

I also made it to a 30D and 50D but my “D’s” fizzled out after that - I saw better investment in interesting lenses that I could continue to use than in forever replacing expensive camera bodies.

One of the best decisons that I made  or I would have quiute a few once expensive and now quite obsolete camera bodies in the attic.  Run out of kids to give old dslr bodies away to and they quite sensibly are not interested in them as I will give away an old camera body but my good lenses I keep.  So what is an old dslr body and the necessity to buy lenses for it to get any value out of it - not very much really.

Of course mirrorless bodies get obsolete as well, but unless you are a Sony A7 series fan then replacing camera bodies has not been such a big finanacial hit.

So I go simple - simple cameras without frills are harder to make obsolete as how does a camera get better these days without offering more frills?  At the most extreme a GM5 is as simple as and therefore unlikely to be obsolete any time soon.  I expect to get a long run out of them.

When we think about it the obvious is that sensors can improve but the law of diminishing returns sets in and once past “good enough” the incentive to pay to get better reduces still further.  But once we get past sensor and see what is offered we start looking at frills - very nice frills perhaps but still frills.

So I am looking for something that I can live comfortably with (good ergonomics) where the frills suit my common photographic sense and I will not feel left out if I keep it for 10 years before I need to update it.  Maybe I am near to that stage already.  But of course there is such a thing as famous last words.

-- hide signature --

Tom Caldwell

Rod McD Veteran Member • Posts: 7,376
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L

Hi Danny,

Nice shooting - some great images there.  We can't see the FL or aperture in the exif .... Did you find most of these were shot at the 300mm long end?  And wide open or a few stops down?  How does it fare wide open?

I'm still shooting my FD300/4L we discussed last year.  I rarely find myself wishing for something shorter.  It's more often the opposite and I add a 1.4X teleconverter.  It has occurred to me that I could "zoom" between a 210/2.8 - 300/4 - 420/5.6 by carrying the lens with a speedbooster and the 1.4X TC.  Just  leave it on the tripod and simply change devices.....  OTOH the need to go shorter rarely happens and the Metabones Ultra speedboosters are not inexpensive.

Cheers, Rod

 Rod McD's gear list:Rod McD's gear list
Canon PowerShot G1 X Olympus Tough TG-4 Fujifilm X-T1 Voigtlander 90mm F3.5 APO-Lanthar SL II Fujifilm XF 35mm F1.4 R +16 more
nzmacro
OP nzmacro Forum Pro • Posts: 17,265
Agreed for sure Tom.

Tom Caldwell wrote:

I have a few issues of my own - I did buy up big in lenses more than 10 years ago at about the Canon 10D stage. I have some really outsatnding gear and even the10D made great images fom it. Then I came to the point where my good EF lenses were forever and Canon just kept spinning out dslr body improvements forever.

The old idea of one great film camera kit is only just starting to take hold again. I can see that some cameras being sold today will still be regarded as great cameras 10 years from now. I gave up on the Canon dslr body churn at the 5D and made it last for nearly 10 years.

I also made it to a 30D and 50D but my “D’s” fizzled out after that - I saw better investment in interesting lenses that I could continue to use than in forever replacing expensive camera bodies.

One of the best decisons that I made or I would have quiute a few once expensive and now quite obsolete camera bodies in the attic. Run out of kids to give old dslr bodies away to and they quite sensibly are not interested in them as I will give away an old camera body but my good lenses I keep. So what is an old dslr body and the necessity to buy lenses for it to get any value out of it - not very much really.

Of course mirrorless bodies get obsolete as well, but unless you are a Sony A7 series fan then replacing camera bodies has not been such a big finanacial hit.

So I go simple - simple cameras without frills are harder to make obsolete as how does a camera get better these days without offering more frills? At the most extreme a GM5 is as simple as and therefore unlikely to be obsolete any time soon. I expect to get a long run out of them.

When we think about it the obvious is that sensors can improve but the law of diminishing returns sets in and once past “good enough” the incentive to pay to get better reduces still further. But once we get past sensor and see what is offered we start looking at frills - very nice frills perhaps but still frills.

So I am looking for something that I can live comfortably with (good ergonomics) where the frills suit my common photographic sense and I will not feel left out if I keep it for 10 years before I need to update it. Maybe I am near to that stage already. But of course there is such a thing as famous last words.

Totally agree Tom. With what we have now in camera specs, the bodies are lasting a lot longer than they did. We have come to a point where the sensors are so darn good there's not much point in the so called upgrade when using MF lenses. If we are into AF lenses, then it becomes a different story. I'm glad I'm not into AF It actually all sounds far too complicated for this old guy.

What they seem to be doing now is to concentrate on certain features, pro capture, frames per second, no EVF blackouts, high res modes, far better electronic silent shutters, etc. The sensors themselves are darn good as they are.

Said it a few times now, you have to go a long way to find a bad camera, but not too far to find a bad photographer. That seems to be the biggest difference now days mate. I'm very happy with entry level camera bodies as long as the lenses are not entry level.

The SLR days, well they all took film, a constant. The sensors have changed a heck of a lot for sure over time, but now it's all leveling off, well seems to be anyway.

With manual focus lenses we don't actually need a heck of a lot in the body, unless we want other special features. The lenses are where it's at. We probably have different priorities to most photographers out there.

Hey, all the best over your way Tom.

Danny.

-- hide signature --

Worry about the image that comes out of the box rather than the box itself
-----------
Birds and BIF's ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/124733969@N06/sets/
The need for speed ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/130646821@N03/albums

nzmacro
OP nzmacro Forum Pro • Posts: 17,265
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L

Rod McD wrote:

Hi Danny,

Nice shooting - some great images there. We can't see the FL or aperture in the exif .... Did you find most of these were shot at the 300mm long end? And wide open or a few stops down? How does it fare wide open?

I'm still shooting my FD300/4L we discussed last year. I rarely find myself wishing for something shorter. It's more often the opposite and I add a 1.4X teleconverter. It has occurred to me that I could "zoom" between a 210/2.8 - 300/4 - 420/5.6 by carrying the lens with a speedbooster and the 1.4X TC. Just leave it on the tripod and simply change devices..... OTOH the need to go shorter rarely happens and the Metabones Ultra speedboosters are not inexpensive.

Cheers, Rod

Howdy Rod, good to see you. Only the macro is stopped down and that's generally F/22 F/32 with a flash.

All at the long end Rod, even for macro.

All my long tele lenses would be around 95% shot wide open Rod. Very rarely do I stop down. the lenses were bought years ago to be able to shoot wide open. So that lens, bird's, BIF's and motorsports, it's all wide open. I should have mentioned that Rod, never occurred to me. Sorry about that.

Would they be better off stopped down, I would say yes of course, but it's the ISO and shutter speeds I want. All tele lenses are probably better stopped down at least a stop, just that I don't Rod. The Canon "L" lenses are excellent wide open.

I've thought about speed boosters Rod and there are a lot of experts in here that would know a lot more about them than I do. Tom would be one for a start. I've always been interested in trying one Rod. Maybe one day I will.

What I did try recently was stacking an Oly 1.4x TC (AF thing) and a Canon FD 1.4x TC. Interesting and not bad at all. In fact, the Oly 1,4x TC is a little better than the Canon.

Ahhh where is it, hang on ......

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/60370879

Not great, but another option Rod and probably works with a fuji 1.4x TC as well.

All the best Rod and that 300 F/4L is a darn nice lens

Danny.

PS: Just doubled checked and yep, all at the long end Rod. I would probably be better off with what you have and have F/4 Hmmmm

-- hide signature --

Worry about the image that comes out of the box rather than the box itself
-----------
Birds and BIF's ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/124733969@N06/sets/
The need for speed ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/130646821@N03/albums

Rod McD Veteran Member • Posts: 7,376
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L
2

Hi there,

Thanks. On focal reducers.......I'm not sure that I'd buy a speed booster for the FD300/4L. Sure it might make a nice 210/2.8 that could be good for sports and theatre or something like that. It might actually be better than the FD 200/2.8, which didn't use UD L glass and and by all accounts gives you the usual PF & CAs you get from film-era teles. In any case it wouldn't be long enough for wildlife, so no use to me unless I suddenly take up stage photography. If, on the other hand, I had a 500/4.5 like you, it might be useful occasionally to come back to - what would it be? - about a 355/3.5 every once in a while for larger animals like maybe seals. (No elephants here across the ditch Danny.)

On TCs...... I've been using my seven element Fuji AF 1.4Xn TC on the FD300/4L and it works very well indeed (obviously in MF). Hard to see any loss. It's every bit as good as the four element FD 1.4XA that was matched to lenses 300mm and up. The nice thing about putting a Fuji TC behind the adapter is that you can use the same TC for all adapted lenses. And yes I've tried putting both of them on - one in front of the adapter and one behind, to get 2X. It does diminish the IQ a tad, but if you did get that shot of a Thylacine it would still be good enough to make you a million. To me, the problem with 2X TCs on long lenses is that they diminish the real aperture too much. The wide open aperture becomes f8. One stop down f11 and it's worse from there..... I think they're better off on shorter FLs with faster apertures.

Here's a recent one from the 300/4L with the Fuji 1.4X. A Grey Shrike Thrush feeding a skink to its chicks. Shot in my carport. Yes I did use flash. I wouldn't normally even consider it, but these guys had put up with cars going in and out at all times of the day and night with lights on, doors slamming, me welding and being there, and plenty of power tool usage while I renovated an old sea kayak. There was no light otherwise - they were well up in the frame work of the roof. They just didn't seem to care.

Cheers, Rod

FD 300/4L with Fuji (AF)1.4X TC

 Rod McD's gear list:Rod McD's gear list
Canon PowerShot G1 X Olympus Tough TG-4 Fujifilm X-T1 Voigtlander 90mm F3.5 APO-Lanthar SL II Fujifilm XF 35mm F1.4 R +16 more
Alan WF
Alan WF Veteran Member • Posts: 3,004
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L
2

Hi Danny,

I bought the New FD 100-300/5.6L earlier in the year, largely on the basis of your post on focus techniques for telephoto lenses in the MFT forum. It's a lot of fun, and definitely a lens that's good enough that any problems are caused mainly by wetware rather than hardware. My best attempt so far aren't in the same class as yours:

Panasonic GM5 with Canon New FD 100-300/5.6L at 1/1000, f/5.6, and ISO 1250.

Panasonic GM5 with Canon New FD 100-300/5.6L at 1/800, f/5.6, and ISO 640.

Despite your article, I wasn't completely convinced of my ability to use this lens on an unstabilized MFT body like the GM5. So, rather than risk US$200 on a lens I wasn't sure I would be able to use (and US$200 is lot to someone on a Mexican salary), I tested the waters with a US$19 New FD 75-200/4.5. This taught me two things. One, that I could actually frame and focus a long lens, albeit with some work and some imprecision. Two, it's a great example of axial CA (Bokeh CA), which is completely absent in the 100-300/5.6L. In the context of Tom's worries about hiccups, we should remember that cheap lenses are the gateway drug to more expensive ones!

So, thanks Danny for the original thread, thanks for the recommendation of the 100-300/5.6L, and thanks for the inspiration of all of your great photos!

Regards,

Alan

 Alan WF's gear list:Alan WF's gear list
Sony a6000 Sony E 16-50mm F3.5-5.6 PZ OSS Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Canon EF-S 10-18mm F4.5–5.6 IS STM Canon EF-S 24mm F2.8 STM +13 more
nzmacro
OP nzmacro Forum Pro • Posts: 17,265
Thanks Alan
2

Well a huge thanks Alan, makes it all worthwhile.

Darn nice shots and love the natural surrounds in those. Excellent natural shots and love the habitat. Going just fine Alan. Cost wise it's a brilliant zoom and the reason it's the only zoom I've kept, just can't part with it. Canon nailed the IQ of that lens.

I also like the way you went about getting it and trying the focal length on a much cheaper lens first to see how you got on, clever thinking and good homework going on.

With the techniques Alan, they are just a guide and how one person goes about it, so try different things and settings, but always try and keep the shutter speeds up. It's fairly lightweight for a 300mm at the long end.

All the best Alan, I've been going over your Canon FD dates on your site BTW I must work mine out.

Danny.

-- hide signature --

Worry about the image that comes out of the box rather than the box itself
-----------
Birds and BIF's ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/124733969@N06/sets/
The need for speed ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/130646821@N03/albums

Brian Wadie
Brian Wadie Forum Pro • Posts: 10,496
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L

Right Danny, I blame you!

Based on your valued input (as always - you're one of my heroes ) I have changed my mind about possibly buying an FD 300f4L and gone for the 100-300 f5.6L instead

Three key factors changed my mind, its saved me £200 (only £99! ), your pics looked remarkably sharp and most importantly of all, you reminded me that this thing has semi-macro potential.

That + the fact that the new firmware for the EM-1mk2 gives me pro capture with the manual focus lens means I'm looking forward to some good cheap fun

Thanks

-- hide signature --

So much to learn, so little time left to do it!

 Brian Wadie's gear list:Brian Wadie's gear list
Sony RX10 IV Canon EOS M6 II Canon EOS R6 Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM Canon EF 100-400mm F4.5-5.6L IS II +1 more
M_digicapt Senior Member • Posts: 3,031
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L
2

Alan WF wrote:

Hi Danny,

In the context of Tom's worries about hiccups, we should remember that cheap lenses are the gateway drug to more expensive ones!

So, thanks Danny for the original thread, thanks for the recommendation of the 100-300/5.6L, and thanks for the inspiration of all of your great photos!

Regards,

Alan

I fully agree! I did the same thing, bought several cheap lenses to try things out first. Only that originally I wanted the FD 300mm f4 L and now am saving for either the FD 80-200mm or the 100-300m L instead. After a bout half a year with manual lenses, I realized that I'm ok with losing a bit of sharpness, to get more flexibility.

Ever since I found NZMacro's manual bif thread my birding experience has been much more enjoyable.

Jrsilva00
Jrsilva00 Regular Member • Posts: 226
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L

Very good photos!!

You are tempting me to get rid of my Panasonic 100-300 and get the old Canon FD 100-300 L.
Danny (or other FD 100-300L owners), does your copy have the zoom barrel too much loose?
I've read that it's a usual issue with this old zoom.
If that's the case it could be difficult to get things sharp if one may have to hold the moving barrel and try to focus at the same time.

 Jrsilva00's gear list:Jrsilva00's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 Olympus E-PL7 Olympus E-M5 II Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Sigma 30mm F1.4 for Micro Four Thirds
kcdogger Veteran Member • Posts: 3,231
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L

Well, I almost sold mine off for pennies, but after seeing your pictures and the lens potential, I think not.

Peace.

John

 kcdogger's gear list:kcdogger's gear list
Panasonic ZS100 Olympus TG-6 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Olympus E-M1 II Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 +19 more
fpessolano
fpessolano Veteran Member • Posts: 3,978
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L

I feel like getting one and a fuji adapter now!

-- hide signature --
 fpessolano's gear list:fpessolano's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS30 Nikon 1 V1 Nikon Z7 Fujifilm X-T3 Nikon Z50 +2 more
nzmacro
OP nzmacro Forum Pro • Posts: 17,265
Re: The Canon FD 100-300 F/5.6L
1

Jrsilva00 wrote:

Very good photos!!

You are tempting me to get rid of my Panasonic 100-300 and get the old Canon FD 100-300 L.
Danny (or other FD 100-300L owners), does your copy have the zoom barrel too much loose?
I've read that it's a usual issue with this old zoom.
If that's the case it could be difficult to get things sharp if one may have to hold the moving barrel and try to focus at the same time.

Well its loose, but not too loose. Put it this way, if I point it down, it doesn't slide by itself. Then again though, it doesn't get a lot of use. No doubt there will be loose push pull zooms out there and not so loose ones. I find it smooth and easy if I had to describe it.

Personally and probably different to a lot out there, for fast action I would sooner have loose than too difficult to zoom. I zoom and focus at the same time and it's just something you get used to after awhile, so loose sort of suits what I want I guess.

All the best and hard to say, but for me, it's right as it is.

Danny.

-- hide signature --

Worry about the image that comes out of the box rather than the box itself
-----------
Birds and BIF's ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/124733969@N06/sets/
The need for speed ..... https://www.flickr.com/photos/130646821@N03/albums

Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads