Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

Started Sep 13, 2017 | Discussions
MacroDonata
MacroDonata New Member • Posts: 17
Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

I haven't done a thorough survey, but it appears that Olympus and Panasonic are the only suppliers to offer both of these features.

As they are both M43, this forum seemed like the right place to start.  I do not currently own a M43 camera, but I am trying to narrow down the field.

My interest is primarily macro.  I am a bit intimidated by the workflow involved in using external stacking software such as PhotoShop or Zerene Stacker, etc.  While the results can be incredible, the time involved can be lengthy.

I like the idea of setting the parameters and letting the camera do the processing internally.  I get that there may be concessions to this approach versus external software, but I'd appreciate your thoughts on the pros and cons of each approach.

Please let me know specifically which cameras you have used with these built-in features.  Thoughts on compatible lenses would be helpful as well.

Thanks for your time.

 MacroDonata's gear list:MacroDonata's gear list
Sony RX100 V Sony SLT-A65 Sony SLT-A57 Olympus E-M5 II Sony DT 16-50mm F2.8 SSM +7 more
alcelc
alcelc Forum Pro • Posts: 10,163
GX85 and any native M43 lenses (I assume)...

... because I do not own any Oly lens yet.

GX85 (so be the G85 or GH5?) has 2 different approaches on macro shooting. 1 of the 4 bracketing modes is focus bracketing for full resolution shots. It require PP to stack.

By the 4K-Photo associated "Post Focus" (which is originally similar to light field shooting but mostly for focus stacking use), by the latest firmware update can do in-camera focus stacking. However, it would be a 8Mp jpg only and the steps is not controllable (mostly up to the camera and how it spray its focus points @30fps across the screen). So sometimes it might not produce a satisfactory result.

Best of all, likely every native M43 lenses (I suppose Oly lenses also?) can be used for either the focus bracketing or in-camera stacking.

-- hide signature --

Albert

 alcelc's gear list:alcelc's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX85 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF3 Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 15mm F1.7 ASPH +9 more
Michael Meissner
Michael Meissner Forum Pro • Posts: 26,190
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

MacroDonata wrote:

I haven't done a thorough survey, but it appears that Olympus and Panasonic are the only suppliers to offer both of these features.

As they are both M43, this forum seemed like the right place to start. I do not currently own a M43 camera, but I am trying to narrow down the field.

My interest is primarily macro. I am a bit intimidated by the workflow involved in using external stacking software such as PhotoShop or Zerene Stacker, etc. While the results can be incredible, the time involved can be lengthy.

I like the idea of setting the parameters and letting the camera do the processing internally. I get that there may be concessions to this approach versus external software, but I'd appreciate your thoughts on the pros and cons of each approach.

Please let me know specifically which cameras you have used with these built-in features. Thoughts on compatible lenses would be helpful as well.

Thanks for your time.

If you are budget challenged, and want the camera to do the work, you might think about the Olympus TG-5.  This is the tough little weather sealed compact that Olympus is selling.

I was in my photo store recently, and it was pretty dead.  I was chatting away with my salesman, when another Olympus shooter comes in.  This guy is interested in macro, when one of the salesmen pulls out the TG-5.  The guy holds out a quarter at an angle to further test how much DOF the process can do.  He shoots the quarter hand held, and the camera takes a few images, processes them, and spits out a JPG of all of the images combined.  I had loaned them a SD card to do the test, and when we zoomed in during the display all of the quarter was in focus.  I looked at the image later before formatting the card and it was in focus.

Now with the TG-5 you don't get much control, but it seems simple and easy to do.  Because it has a 1/2.3" sensor, it has much more depth of field than the micro 4/3rds cameras do.

Now the E-m1 mark I (after a firmware update) and the E-m1 mark II have both automatic focus stacking (camera merges together up to 8 multiple shots automatically) and focus bracketing (camera takes multiple shots and you have to merge them in post processing).  Note focus stacking can only be used with a handle of Olympus lenses (the 60mm macro, 12-40mm pro, 40-150mm pro, but not the 12-100mm pro lens, etc.).  Focus bracketing can be used with native micro 4/3rds auto focus lenses, but it isn't as automatic.

The E-m5 mark II got a different feature called high resolution (or hi-res) mode (the E-m1 mark II has both focus stacking and hi-res).  It uses the IS motor to slightly move the sensor multiple times, to give you a combined image that has much more pixels than the standard image gives you.

 Michael Meissner's gear list:Michael Meissner's gear list
Olympus Stylus 1 Olympus E-5 Olympus OM-D E-M5 Olympus Zuiko Digital 14-54mm 1:2.8-3.5 Olympus 14-150 F4-5.6 II +21 more
rjensen11 Regular Member • Posts: 163
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking
1

I have the EM1 M2, but I'm using the 75mm/1.8 so I can do focus bracketing only.

Using Photoshop to focus stack the images is really quite easy. If you use LR you can load all the images as layers in one step, or you can load all of the images into PS with one step.

Once they are loaded into PS it is just two menu functions: auto-align and then merge. You wouldn't want to do hundreds of merges, but if you're doing several it isn't too bad. I suspect if you get serious about it you'll ultimately want the control of doing it in PS vs. the camera doing it for you and making some assumptions on how to process them. There are plenty of websites and YouTube videos that explain how to do it. The basic stacking is process brain dead easy.

Good luck.

 rjensen11's gear list:rjensen11's gear list
Olympus E-M1 II Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 Olympus 12-100mm F4.0 Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm F1.8 +4 more
zuikowesty
zuikowesty Veteran Member • Posts: 4,053
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

Michael Meissner wrote:

MacroDonata wrote:

I haven't done a thorough survey, but it appears that Olympus and Panasonic are the only suppliers to offer both of these features.

As they are both M43, this forum seemed like the right place to start. I do not currently own a M43 camera, but I am trying to narrow down the field.

My interest is primarily macro. I am a bit intimidated by the workflow involved in using external stacking software such as PhotoShop or Zerene Stacker, etc. While the results can be incredible, the time involved can be lengthy.

I like the idea of setting the parameters and letting the camera do the processing internally. I get that there may be concessions to this approach versus external software, but I'd appreciate your thoughts on the pros and cons of each approach.

Please let me know specifically which cameras you have used with these built-in features. Thoughts on compatible lenses would be helpful as well.

Thanks for your time.

If you are budget challenged, and want the camera to do the work, you might think about the Olympus TG-5. This is the tough little weather sealed compact that Olympus is selling.

I was in my photo store recently, and it was pretty dead. I was chatting away with my salesman, when another Olympus shooter comes in. This guy is interested in macro, when one of the salesmen pulls out the TG-5. The guy holds out a quarter at an angle to further test how much DOF the process can do. He shoots the quarter hand held, and the camera takes a few images, processes them, and spits out a JPG of all of the images combined. I had loaned them a SD card to do the test, and when we zoomed in during the display all of the quarter was in focus. I looked at the image later before formatting the card and it was in focus.

Now with the TG-5 you don't get much control, but it seems simple and easy to do. Because it has a 1/2.3" sensor, it has much more depth of field than the micro 4/3rds cameras do.

Now the E-m1 mark I (after a firmware update) and the E-m1 mark II have both automatic focus stacking (camera merges together up to 8 multiple shots automatically) and focus bracketing (camera takes multiple shots and you have to merge them in post processing). Note focus stacking can only be used with a handle of Olympus lenses (the 60mm macro, 12-40mm pro, 40-150mm pro, but not the 12-100mm pro lens, etc.). Focus bracketing can be used with native micro 4/3rds auto focus lenses, but it isn't as automatic.

The E-m5 mark II got a different feature called high resolution (or hi-res) mode (the E-m1 mark II has both focus stacking and hi-res). It uses the IS motor to slightly move the sensor multiple times, to give you a combined image that has much more pixels than the standard image gives you.

The E-M5ii also has focus bracketing, but not stacking. I don't believe focus bracketing can be combined with HR mode, and HR mode is also limited to f/8.

 zuikowesty's gear list:zuikowesty's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PM2 Olympus OM-D E-M5 Olympus E-M5 II Panasonic Lumix G Vario HD 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 Mega OIS Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 +11 more
zuikowesty
zuikowesty Veteran Member • Posts: 4,053
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking
1

rjensen11 wrote:

I have the EM1 M2, but I'm using the 75mm/1.8 so I can do focus bracketing only.

Using Photoshop to focus stack the images is really quite easy. If you use LR you can load all the images as layers in one step, or you can load all of the images into PS with one step.

Once they are loaded into PS it is just two menu functions: auto-align and then merge. You wouldn't want to do hundreds of merges, but if you're doing several it isn't too bad. I suspect if you get serious about it you'll ultimately want the control of doing it in PS vs. the camera doing it for you and making some assumptions on how to process them. There are plenty of websites and YouTube videos that explain how to do it. The basic stacking is process brain dead easy.

Good luck.

This assumes you have sufficient RAM to process 15+ RAW files in PS. My system chokes at about 13-14 RAWs when trying to merge in PS, with 16Gb RAM. Performance is fine otherwise, with a fast video card and SSDs, but the board is maxed out at 16Gb. Just a warning if you have 16Gb or less...

 zuikowesty's gear list:zuikowesty's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PM2 Olympus OM-D E-M5 Olympus E-M5 II Panasonic Lumix G Vario HD 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 Mega OIS Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 +11 more
daddyo Forum Pro • Posts: 12,670
It works very well...
6

I shoot with the E-M1 Mk1 and right now the only lens I have that allows focus stacking is the amazing 12-40mm -- which works surprisingly well.

I hope to get the Oly 60mm macro, but honestly am waiting for a really good deal on a clean used one. I already have the Oly 4/3's 50mm f/2 Macro, and the Oly 4/3's 35mm f/3.5 Macro, so justifying another somewhat pricey lens is a bit of a stretch right now.

The Focus Stacking feature on the E-M1 is very simple to use. Set the focus interval in the menus, turn on Focus Stacking in the Bracketing menus and shoot -- the camera does a great job of aligning all 8 images and combines them into a 9 th, slightly cropped image.

If you use the DTC (Digital Teleconverter) which I often do, you can get very macro-like images straight out of the camera using the 12-40mm.

Here are a few examples using the 12-40mm, which focuses amazingly close.

-- hide signature --

God Bless,
Greg
www.imagismphotos.com
www.mccroskery.zenfolio.com
www.pbase.com/daddyo

 daddyo's gear list:daddyo's gear list
Olympus 12-40mm F2.8
rjensen11 Regular Member • Posts: 163
Re: It works very well...

Wow, great shots.

 rjensen11's gear list:rjensen11's gear list
Olympus E-M1 II Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 Olympus 12-100mm F4.0 Olympus 40-150mm F2.8 Pro Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm F1.8 +4 more
Tommi K1 Senior Member • Posts: 6,299
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking
4

Does GH4/5 do the bracketing in raw instead in video mode, and even stacking like Olympus does?

E-M1 mk1 and mk2 does 999 frame bracketing and 8 frame stacking.

Others like E-M10 mk2 and E-M5 mk2, does only bracketing.

What used on E-M1 Mk1 the speed is great as it goes up to 11 fps so to take 10 frame bracket it is about second.

Easy to do without a remote as you can just manually focus (no focus clutch) to closest range and then barely touch the screen to release shutter and let it focus. And because you are in body MF setting, you can touch again screen and it continues from where you left as many times you get cover the whole subject(scene).

This is again where a tilt screen is superior as pull it slightly out and angle it with the body so your finger motion is just sliding on screen surface. Great in tight places where a side swivel would on the way and extended.

Of course if you use a remote release it is as well easy with MF setting as well.

You want to get a software that does stacking effectively and without much hassles.

I only tested lightroom and photoshop, helicon focus, affinity photo and two others and run three setups of same files (10 frames, 20 frames and 40 frames) from five scenes (2 macro, 1 close-up, 2 landscape) with default and some custom settings based what tutorials found and affinity photo was best of all, especially when it came to fix some haloes as you can just pick layer and paint it in Live-Filter if needed.

And it was fast and easy just get files loaded and processed. Was second fastest, but fastest was one another that just "was there and be done".

This is one reason why I would like to use E-M1 Mk2 but its screen is just not so great for macro work or touch operations same way.

But Olympus makes it just super easy, need to go just shooting menu and turn bracketing ON and shoot (unless having a MySet).

After using that MF trick, there is no reason to go to adjust bracketing settings but just shoot and pick the frames as wanted. Most often 10-20 frames is more than enough with 30mm or 60mm macro with 1 step and 10 frame setup.

zuikowesty
zuikowesty Veteran Member • Posts: 4,053
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

Tommi K1 wrote:

Does GH4/5 do the bracketing in raw instead in video mode, and even stacking like Olympus does?

E-M1 mk1 and mk2 does 999 frame bracketing and 8 frame stacking.

Others like E-M10 mk2 and E-M5 mk2, does only bracketing.

What used on E-M1 Mk1 the speed is great as it goes up to 11 fps so to take 10 frame bracket it is about second.

Easy to do without a remote as you can just manually focus (no focus clutch) to closest range and then barely touch the screen to release shutter and let it focus. And because you are in body MF setting, you can touch again screen and it continues from where you left as many times you get cover the whole subject(scene).

This is again where a tilt screen is superior as pull it slightly out and angle it with the body so your finger motion is just sliding on screen surface. Great in tight places where a side swivel would on the way and extended.

Of course if you use a remote release it is as well easy with MF setting as well.

You want to get a software that does stacking effectively and without much hassles.

I only tested lightroom and photoshop, helicon focus, affinity photo and two others and run three setups of same files (10 frames, 20 frames and 40 frames) from five scenes (2 macro, 1 close-up, 2 landscape) with default and some custom settings based what tutorials found and affinity photo was best of all, especially when it came to fix some haloes as you can just pick layer and paint it in Live-Filter if needed.

And it was fast and easy just get files loaded and processed. Was second fastest, but fastest was one another that just "was there and be done".

This is one reason why I would like to use E-M1 Mk2 but its screen is just not so great for macro work or touch operations same way.

But Olympus makes it just super easy, need to go just shooting menu and turn bracketing ON and shoot (unless having a MySet).

After using that MF trick, there is no reason to go to adjust bracketing settings but just shoot and pick the frames as wanted. Most often 10-20 frames is more than enough with 30mm or 60mm macro with 1 step and 10 frame setup.

Thanks, some good tips here. I just wish my FT 50/2 macro was supported. My 12-40 will have to do. As the weather cools, I might find some time to try some indoor macros.

 zuikowesty's gear list:zuikowesty's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PM2 Olympus OM-D E-M5 Olympus E-M5 II Panasonic Lumix G Vario HD 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 Mega OIS Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 +11 more
daddyo Forum Pro • Posts: 12,670
Thanks! (n/t)
-- hide signature --

God Bless,
Greg
www.imagismphotos.com
www.mccroskery.zenfolio.com
www.pbase.com/daddyo

 daddyo's gear list:daddyo's gear list
Olympus 12-40mm F2.8
hindesite Veteran Member • Posts: 4,099
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

Tommi K1 wrote:

Does GH4/5 do the bracketing in raw instead in video mode, and even stacking like Olympus does?

E-M1 mk1 and mk2 does 999 frame bracketing and 8 frame stacking.

Others like E-M10 mk2 and E-M5 mk2, does only bracketing.

What used on E-M1 Mk1 the speed is great as it goes up to 11 fps so to take 10 frame bracket it is about second.

Easy to do without a remote as you can just manually focus (no focus clutch) to closest range and then barely touch the screen to release shutter and let it focus. And because you are in body MF setting, you can touch again screen and it continues from where you left as many times you get cover the whole subject(scene).

This is again where a tilt screen is superior as pull it slightly out and angle it with the body so your finger motion is just sliding on screen surface. Great in tight places where a side swivel would on the way and extended.

Of course if you use a remote release it is as well easy with MF setting as well.

You want to get a software that does stacking effectively and without much hassles.

I only tested lightroom and photoshop, helicon focus, affinity photo and two others and run three setups of same files (10 frames, 20 frames and 40 frames) from five scenes (2 macro, 1 close-up, 2 landscape) with default and some custom settings based what tutorials found and affinity photo was best of all, especially when it came to fix some haloes as you can just pick layer and paint it in Live-Filter if needed.

And it was fast and easy just get files loaded and processed. Was second fastest, but fastest was one another that just "was there and be done".

This is one reason why I would like to use E-M1 Mk2 but its screen is just not so great for macro work or touch operations same way.

But Olympus makes it just super easy, need to go just shooting menu and turn bracketing ON and shoot (unless having a MySet).

After using that MF trick, there is no reason to go to adjust bracketing settings but just shoot and pick the frames as wanted. Most often 10-20 frames is more than enough with 30mm or 60mm macro with 1 step and 10 frame setup.

Wow, that must have been a lot of work.

How about you share the results?

-- hide signature --
hindesite Veteran Member • Posts: 4,099
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

zuikowesty wrote:

This assumes you have sufficient RAM to process 15+ RAW files in PS. My system chokes at about 13-14 RAWs when trying to merge in PS, with 16Gb RAM. Performance is fine otherwise, with a fast video card and SSDs, but the board is maxed out at 16Gb. Just a warning if you have 16Gb or less...

Seems like a really good reason NOT to use PS; there are great, dedicated alternatives that are optimised for this one task, and some of them are free.

Also easier to use for this task.

-- hide signature --
Lichtspiel
Lichtspiel Senior Member • Posts: 1,239
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

zuikowesty wrote:

rjensen11 wrote:

I have the EM1 M2, but I'm using the 75mm/1.8 so I can do focus bracketing only.

Using Photoshop to focus stack the images is really quite easy. If you use LR you can load all the images as layers in one step, or you can load all of the images into PS with one step.

Once they are loaded into PS it is just two menu functions: auto-align and then merge. You wouldn't want to do hundreds of merges, but if you're doing several it isn't too bad. I suspect if you get serious about it you'll ultimately want the control of doing it in PS vs. the camera doing it for you and making some assumptions on how to process them. There are plenty of websites and YouTube videos that explain how to do it. The basic stacking is process brain dead easy.

Good luck.

This assumes you have sufficient RAM to process 15+ RAW files in PS. My system chokes at about 13-14 RAWs when trying to merge in PS, with 16Gb RAM. Performance is fine otherwise, with a fast video card and SSDs, but the board is maxed out at 16Gb. Just a warning if you have 16Gb or less...

But you don't HAVE to use RAWs... Beautify them in your favorite converter and turn them to JPGs for the merge. Just saying...

 Lichtspiel's gear list:Lichtspiel's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 15mm F1.7 ASPH Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 R Rokinon 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye CS Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 +2 more
Lichtspiel
Lichtspiel Senior Member • Posts: 1,239
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking
1

hindesite wrote:

zuikowesty wrote:

This assumes you have sufficient RAM to process 15+ RAW files in PS. My system chokes at about 13-14 RAWs when trying to merge in PS, with 16Gb RAM. Performance is fine otherwise, with a fast video card and SSDs, but the board is maxed out at 16Gb. Just a warning if you have 16Gb or less...

Seems like a really good reason NOT to use PS; there are great, dedicated alternatives that are optimised for this one task, and some of them are free.

Also easier to use for this task.

Could you recommend some of the free software that is superior to what PS can deliver?

I have played both with Zerene and Helicon and would love to find something free, simple and better than PS.

Thanks!

 Lichtspiel's gear list:Lichtspiel's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 15mm F1.7 ASPH Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 R Rokinon 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye CS Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 +2 more
SteveY80 Senior Member • Posts: 1,093
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

zuikowesty wrote:

rjensen11 wrote:

I have the EM1 M2, but I'm using the 75mm/1.8 so I can do focus bracketing only.

Using Photoshop to focus stack the images is really quite easy. If you use LR you can load all the images as layers in one step, or you can load all of the images into PS with one step.

Once they are loaded into PS it is just two menu functions: auto-align and then merge. You wouldn't want to do hundreds of merges, but if you're doing several it isn't too bad. I suspect if you get serious about it you'll ultimately want the control of doing it in PS vs. the camera doing it for you and making some assumptions on how to process them. There are plenty of websites and YouTube videos that explain how to do it. The basic stacking is process brain dead easy.

Good luck.

This assumes you have sufficient RAM to process 15+ RAW files in PS. My system chokes at about 13-14 RAWs when trying to merge in PS, with 16Gb RAM. Performance is fine otherwise, with a fast video card and SSDs, but the board is maxed out at 16Gb. Just a warning if you have 16Gb or less...

I think there's definitely something unusual going on there. I've successfully stacked more images than that (including 24mp shots from my Sony A77ii, imported as TIFFs from Lightroom) in Photoshop on a system with 8Gb RAM and onboard graphics.

Photoshop can be a bit slow, but I find that it'll get there in the end without completely choking...

 SteveY80's gear list:SteveY80's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1 Sony a77 II Fujifilm X-M1 Nikon 1 J1 +1 more
hindesite Veteran Member • Posts: 4,099
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

Lichtspiel wrote:

hindesite wrote:

zuikowesty wrote:

This assumes you have sufficient RAM to process 15+ RAW files in PS. My system chokes at about 13-14 RAWs when trying to merge in PS, with 16Gb RAM. Performance is fine otherwise, with a fast video card and SSDs, but the board is maxed out at 16Gb. Just a warning if you have 16Gb or less...

Seems like a really good reason NOT to use PS; there are great, dedicated alternatives that are optimised for this one task, and some of them are free.

Also easier to use for this task.

Could you recommend some of the free software that is superior to what PS can deliver?

You seem to have mischaracterised my statement, thanks for that. Superiority in what way were you particularly after?

Also, if PS chokes with 16Gb ram, it can't deliver anything.

I have played both with Zerene and Helicon and would love to find something free, simple and better than PS.

Thanks!

Sure, see my first thread started in this forum, back in 2009.

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/2717045

See also a more recent post https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/56780684

-- hide signature --
Lichtspiel
Lichtspiel Senior Member • Posts: 1,239
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

hindesite wrote:

Lichtspiel wrote:

hindesite wrote:

zuikowesty wrote:

This assumes you have sufficient RAM to process 15+ RAW files in PS. My system chokes at about 13-14 RAWs when trying to merge in PS, with 16Gb RAM. Performance is fine otherwise, with a fast video card and SSDs, but the board is maxed out at 16Gb. Just a warning if you have 16Gb or less...

Seems like a really good reason NOT to use PS; there are great, dedicated alternatives that are optimised for this one task, and some of them are free.

Also easier to use for this task.

Could you recommend some of the free software that is superior to what PS can deliver?

You seem to have mischaracterised my statement, thanks for that. Superiority in what way were you particularly after?

Sorry if I misinterpreted your reply, it sounded to me like you had some great alternatives to PS. I would like to find stacking software that minimizes the artifacts that you get around the sharpness transition zones, while still being fairly easy to use. And not too expensive.

Also, if PS chokes with 16Gb ram, it can't deliver anything.

I have played both with Zerene and Helicon and would love to find something free, simple and better than PS.

Thanks!

Sure, see my first thread started in this forum, back in 2009.

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/2717045

Thanks. A while ago I did try the two free stackers mentioned, but eventually went back to PS for a simpler workflow. I figure there may be some new or more recent utility that is easier to use, perhaps there is not. Appreciate your reply.

 Lichtspiel's gear list:Lichtspiel's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 15mm F1.7 ASPH Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 R Rokinon 7.5mm F3.5 UMC Fisheye CS Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 +2 more
Elmokki Regular Member • Posts: 276
Re: Thoughts on cameras w/ built-in focus bracketing/stacking

Bracketing can be done in RAW with even cheaper and older Panasonics like GX80, but stacking I cannot say about for GH5 since that is 4K JPG only in GX80.

 Elmokki's gear list:Elmokki's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX85 Panasonic Lumix G 25mm F1.7 ASPH Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 R Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm 1:2.8 Macro +3 more
Martin JC Senior Member • Posts: 2,385
Re: It works very well...

Greg, lovely images....

Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads