NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

Started Aug 2, 2017 | Discussions
(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 13,189
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

robgendreau wrote:

I used Neofinder way back when I had to manage lotsa archived PDFs and .doc files on CDs (I suspect the multiple catalog structure is a holdover from the days when we had boxes of CDs). It was nice (we moved to Devonthink instead though). So, curious, I fired it back up, and while I'm impressed you can actually edit photo metadata, it's very meh as a replacement for Aperture, Lr or Photos. . You can't even move stuff about, maybe because of that history of CD storage. Frankly other than previews for offline images, I couldn't see that it would be that helpful over any of a whole mess of Finder alternatives (and there are other cataloguers, like Tri-Edre's, but it's more expensive, although I think it does more).

If it works for your workflow, great. But I don't think it's gonna woo over many users of more photo-centric DAMs.

Like me. Did try it (took a day to import the LR data I need), no go. Not close to being a substitute for the LR DAM for my needs.

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myotisone Senior Member • Posts: 1,905
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

Andy Hewitt wrote:

I only tried it yesterday - just reinstalled it, and it's in the contextual menu under 'Services'.

I saw the preview settings now, and they default to 128, which seems a bit too conservative these days.

Ah yes, its there and also available in the "open with" option in the same contextual menu.  I have the previews at 1024, which is is fine for what I want

Fortunately, I have always used XMP sidecar files and referenced databases, rather than managed, regardless of the programs I have been using (which actually made Neofinder a non starter for me until recently when it added full XMP integration and editing).

I've tried using them, but in LR they only seem to be useful if you use other Adobe software (there are some others with limited support, but not much).

The XMPs are how I have transferred all relevant DAM information between Photo Mechanic, Media Pro, NeoFinder, Capture One, LightRoom and Fast Raw Viewer. Any updates I make in any of these programs are automatically (or semi-automatically, ie you need to rebuild the database) updated in all the other programs.  I haven't found anything that doesn't transfer between programs, but you need to be careful with things like colour tags as some programs have more colours available than others.  XMPs are at the core of allowing me to use multiple programs in my workflow.

Maybe because I come from the days of darkrooms and negatives, I don't see this as being a massive problem, as long as I have a reference final copy. With film negatives you always needed to start from scratch. For my personal photography, however, I don't think I would ever want to re-edit an image I produced earlier, and would alway want to start from scratch.

I never intend to, but sometimes I've found evolution in software has meant that a lot of older photos can benefit from some tweaking.

Ah, yes Capture One is good/bad for this, as they produce a new raw engine with each new release, and its a common complaint/complement, that having seen the improvements from the latest engine, people feel the need to re-process all their existing images.

Cheers,

Graham

Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 3,989
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

myotisone wrote:

Fortunately, I have always used XMP sidecar files and referenced databases, rather than managed, regardless of the programs I have been using (which actually made Neofinder a non starter for me until recently when it added full XMP integration and editing).

I've tried using them, but in LR they only seem to be useful if you use other Adobe software (there are some others with limited support, but not much).

The XMPs are how I have transferred all relevant DAM information between Photo Mechanic, Media Pro, NeoFinder, Capture One, LightRoom and Fast Raw Viewer. Any updates I make in any of these programs are automatically (or semi-automatically, ie you need to rebuild the database) updated in all the other programs. I haven't found anything that doesn't transfer between programs, but you need to be careful with things like colour tags as some programs have more colours available than others. XMPs are at the core of allowing me to use multiple programs in my workflow.

Yeah, I understand the use of XMPs, and portability of some of the data in them, but it's edit data I need to be portable, and that only seems possible if you keep that part of the workflow within a given environment. I know 'some' apps can read/write Adobe XMP data, but only within limitations.

I tend to be a bit more lightweight in my use of metadata, as I use a filing system that suits me in a way that I can quickly go to sets of images I need without too much searching.

Maybe because I come from the days of darkrooms and negatives, I don't see this as being a massive problem, as long as I have a reference final copy. With film negatives you always needed to start from scratch. For my personal photography, however, I don't think I would ever want to re-edit an image I produced earlier, and would alway want to start from scratch.

I never intend to, but sometimes I've found evolution in software has meant that a lot of older photos can benefit from some tweaking.

Ah, yes Capture One is good/bad for this, as they produce a new raw engine with each new release, and its a common complaint/complement, that having seen the improvements from the latest engine, people feel the need to re-process all their existing images.

They're all like that I think, Aperture got to version 3 of its Raw processing, and I know there's been at least that many for Adobe too.

As it happens, I think the upgrades make very small differences in reality. The need to reprocess everything is probably a bit more paranoia than anything else.

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Andy Hewitt

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myotisone Senior Member • Posts: 1,905
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

Andy Hewitt wrote:

Yeah, I understand the use of XMPs, and portability of some of the data in them, but it's edit data I need to be portable, and that only seems possible if you keep that part of the workflow within a given environment. I know 'some' apps can read/write Adobe XMP data, but only within limitations.

Ah, OK.  I hadn't thought about the edit data being transferable between programs

I tend to be a bit more lightweight in my use of metadata, as I use a filing system that suits me in a way that I can quickly go to sets of images I need without too much searching.

Yes it all depends on what you need,and how you set things up. My files are all in system folders arranged by capture date, so I really need some tools to help me find things.

Cheers,

Graham

robgendreau Veteran Member • Posts: 6,063
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

myotisone wrote:

The XMPs are how I have transferred all relevant DAM information between Photo Mechanic, Media Pro, NeoFinder, Capture One, LightRoom and Fast Raw Viewer. Any updates I make in any of these programs are automatically (or semi-automatically, ie you need to rebuild the database) updated in all the other programs. I haven't found anything that doesn't transfer between programs, but you need to be careful with things like colour tags as some programs have more colours available than others. XMPs are at the core of allowing me to use multiple programs in my workflow.

Maybe because I come from the days of darkrooms and negatives, I don't see this as being a massive problem, as long as I have a reference final copy. With film negatives you always needed to start from scratch. For my personal photography, however, I don't think I would ever want to re-edit an image I produced earlier, and would alway want to start from scratch.

I never intend to, but sometimes I've found evolution in software has meant that a lot of older photos can benefit from some tweaking.

Ah, yes Capture One is good/bad for this, as they produce a new raw engine with each new release, and its a common complaint/complement, that having seen the improvements from the latest engine, people feel the need to re-process all their existing images.

Since we've kinda exhausted the merits of the tools out there, I'm wondering about the workflow. I have kinda lost the thread of what kind of tool we're seeking here.

All the standard photo metadata is in the files or in sidecars. And most any photo application can find files with that, as can the Finder via Spotlight. Pretty much any given folder or even collection structure can be replicated via keywords and filters, saved searches or smart folders (although I find it's a lot easier with hierarchical keywords). So what's left as a need? Just the previews we've been talking about?

On my machines (MBP 15" 2015 and 2014 iMac) I can browse pretty much any directly attached storage really fast, and the Spotlight searches of metadata is also very quick. While I'd be in trouble if all the photo editing/managing applications went poof! the same isn't true for the finding photos end of things. In fact, I often use Houdah Spot to find photos esp if I also wanna find text files or PDFs associated with them, for say publication work (HS seems to be able to find the image files associated with sidecars; PF is nice cuz it can show exif and show the contents of XMP files themselves and even edit them). And all that's very very fast. Probably why (with the exception of Devonthink) I don't use cataloguers any more. What else do you need?

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myotisone Senior Member • Posts: 1,905
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

robgendreau wrote:

Since we've kinda exhausted the merits of the tools out there, I'm wondering about the workflow. I have kinda lost the thread of what kind of tool we're seeking here.

I'm not sure anyone is seeking anything here.

The OP seems happy with Neofinder, and was sharing his happiness, and I am reasonably happy with my Photo Mechanic/Capture One/Media Pro workflow, which in some form or another I have been using for over ten years now.  But I do have a cataloging issue with both Capture One and Media Pro, which Neofinder seemed to resolve.

The discussion developed from the argument that Neofinder was no better than browser based programs, and my experiences of browser based programs being slow to browse through large numbers of thumbnail previews.  For example, in spite of PhotoMechanics speed for everything else, it's useless for browsing large numbers of thumbnail previews even though its using the Raw built in Jpegs (as was FotoStation). Media Pro and NeoFinder on the other hand fly through these same files using their own previews.

But, as mentioned in other posts, and I can't obviously speak for the OP, I may well have a look at some of the browsers mentioned, as I had previously dismissed it as an option.

Cheers,

Graham

robgendreau Veteran Member • Posts: 6,063
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution
3

myotisone wrote:

robgendreau wrote:

Since we've kinda exhausted the merits of the tools out there, I'm wondering about the workflow. I have kinda lost the thread of what kind of tool we're seeking here.

I'm not sure anyone is seeking anything here.

The OP seems happy with Neofinder, and was sharing his happiness, and I am reasonably happy with my Photo Mechanic/Capture One/Media Pro workflow, which in some form or another I have been using for over ten years now. But I do have a cataloging issue with both Capture One and Media Pro, which Neofinder seemed to resolve.

The discussion developed from the argument that Neofinder was no better than browser based programs, and my experiences of browser based programs being slow to browse through large numbers of thumbnail previews. For example, in spite of PhotoMechanics speed for everything else, it's useless for browsing large numbers of thumbnail previews even though its using the Raw built in Jpegs (as was FotoStation). Media Pro and NeoFinder on the other hand fly through these same files using their own previews.

But, as mentioned in other posts, and I can't obviously speak for the OP, I may well have a look at some of the browsers mentioned, as I had previously dismissed it as an option.

Ah, I see. Fast previewing, esp of RAWs, is why I use FastRawViewer.

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myotisone Senior Member • Posts: 1,905
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

robgendreau wrote:

Ah, I see. Fast previewing, esp of RAWs, is why I use FastRawViewer.

I forgot to mention FRV in my workflow

But I'm not sure it helps with with viewing multiple thumbnails from multiple folders.

Maybe I should describe my standard expectations from a DAM.

Let's say I am looking for an image taken with a Nikon D600, at 1600 iso of a bird, this is all that matters, as I just want an example of a bird photograph at this iso with this camera.

This might yield a few thousand thumbnails that I then want to quickly  skim through as pages of small thumbnails to find a few images that might do the job.

I can't do this in Capture One, because that is split into multiple catalogues.

In theory I could have done it in LightRoom as that was one big catalogue. but moving through thumbnails was just too slow.

PhotoMechanic needs me to open all the files in my file collection before it can search them. This can take hours !

Fotostation was better because it catalogued metadata, but still took  for ever to open/scroll through thumbnails, as it used the embedded jpegs.

Media Pro does this as quickly as  I can type or scroll.

NeoFinder isn't as quick as Media Pro but its quicker than anything else I have tried.

Photo supreme was very fast with the search, but was still slow to render thumbnails.

So far, I haven't looked at how the alternatives browser approaches suggested here might work for this.

Cheers,

Graham

lightandaprayer Senior Member • Posts: 3,089
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution
3

I realize that you cannot mention every option available but I would expect to see FastRawViewer in your list.  It's similar to PhotoMechanic as it's a very fast image browser. But while PM is geared toward ingesting and labeling, etc. FRV is about evaluating RAW images and speeding up image conversion.

The difference in cost is considerable: $20 vs. $150 for PM. When FRV is on sale (which seems to be a regular event. . .) it costs around $14.

myotisone Senior Member • Posts: 1,905
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

lightandaprayer wrote:

I realize that you cannot mention every option available but I would expect to see FastRawViewer in your list. It's similar to PhotoMechanic as it's a very fast image browser. But while PM is geared toward ingesting and labeling, etc. FRV is about evaluating RAW images and speeding up image conversion.

FRV was mentioned in a couple of posts just before this your post.

I use a Photo Mechanic with FRV set up as the default "editor" to do the things you say. PM is great for ingesting, labelling and general file management tasks, along with initial culling, FRV then allows a more detailed evaluation.

BUT neither meet the basic search and browsing requirements of a DAM as they only work on files which they have open. Unless I am missing the obvious.

Cheers,

Graham

myotisone Senior Member • Posts: 1,905
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

robgendreau wrote:

But no, it doesn't do albums. But you can search/filter by keywords, exif, and all sorts of other criteria, and then save those searches, so they act like smart albums.

I am having a relook at GC, but I only have the version 9, and a) can't workout how to search on the IPTC data in the XMP sidecar files, and b) how to save these searches

Is this something in version 10?  The manual on the Lemke site is still for V9 and I can't see where this is explained.

I've found flat view, which is good, but as with other browser based options, I am finding the thumbnail rendering to be unusably slow, but still keen to see how far I can go with GC.

I also looked at Lyn, which seems very nice, but I can't find a flat view option or anyway of searching across multiple folders.

I know I should stick with what I've got as that is generally working fine for me, but this discussion on browsers has peaked my interest and I'm always keen to reduce the number of programs I use, if I can.

Thanks,

Graham

Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 3,989
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

myotisone wrote:

robgendreau wrote:

Ah, I see. Fast previewing, esp of RAWs, is why I use FastRawViewer.

I forgot to mention FRV in my workflow

But I'm not sure it helps with with viewing multiple thumbnails from multiple folders.

Maybe I should describe my standard expectations from a DAM.

Let's say I am looking for an image taken with a Nikon D600, at 1600 iso of a bird, this is all that matters, as I just want an example of a bird photograph at this iso with this camera.

I hate to say this, but that is easily possible with Photos, a Smart Album can be set up to find all/any of those criteria (as long as you make good use of Keywords of course), and is pretty quick doing it.

This might yield a few thousand thumbnails that I then want to quickly skim through as pages of small thumbnails to find a few images that might do the job.

I can't do this in Capture One, because that is split into multiple catalogues.

Yes, splitting catalogues does have that disadvantage. PowerPhotos for Photos does search across different libraries, but with limitations. I can see how you can end up with a mass of different management tools to achieve everything you need.

In theory I could have done it in LightRoom as that was one big catalogue. but moving through thumbnails was just too slow.

I didn't find it made any difference with a smaller catalogue. Surely if you regularly need to search for similar items across different catalogues, then your images are in the wrong catalogues?

PhotoMechanic needs me to open all the files in my file collection before it can search them. This can take hours !

Fotostation was better because it catalogued metadata, but still took for ever to open/scroll through thumbnails, as it used the embedded jpegs.

Media Pro does this as quickly as I can type or scroll.

NeoFinder isn't as quick as Media Pro but its quicker than anything else I have tried.

Photo supreme was very fast with the search, but was still slow to render thumbnails.

So far, I haven't looked at how the alternatives browser approaches suggested here might work for this.

I think this is what makes managing collections of images so flipping' complicated. There are many needs for different things, and none of them has everything - even at a cost.

As far as I can see, from years of playing around with all the software myself, at some point you are going to have to compromise on how you manage your files, and accept that you're either going to get full integration with less control and flexibility but easy management, or it's a more flexible and open system that's harder work to maintain.

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Andy Hewitt

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robgendreau Veteran Member • Posts: 6,063
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

myotisone wrote:

I forgot to mention FRV in my workflow

But I'm not sure it helps with with viewing multiple thumbnails from multiple folders.

Maybe I should describe my standard expectations from a DAM.

Let's say I am looking for an image taken with a Nikon D600, at 1600 iso of a bird, this is all that matters, as I just want an example of a bird photograph at this iso with this camera.

This might yield a few thousand thumbnails that I then want to quickly skim through as pages of small thumbnails to find a few images that might do the job.

I can't do this in Capture One, because that is split into multiple catalogues.

In theory I could have done it in LightRoom as that was one big catalogue. but moving through thumbnails was just too slow.

PhotoMechanic needs me to open all the files in my file collection before it can search them. This can take hours !

Fotostation was better because it catalogued metadata, but still took for ever to open/scroll through thumbnails, as it used the embedded jpegs.

Media Pro does this as quickly as I can type or scroll.

NeoFinder isn't as quick as Media Pro but its quicker than anything else I have tried.

Photo supreme was very fast with the search, but was still slow to render thumbnails.

So far, I haven't looked at how the alternatives browser approaches suggested here might work for this.

Photo Mechanic uses Spotlight to "search." It "searches" images anywhere on your Mac or indexed attached storage. It is problematic on my machine though, as it's too slow and frequently crashes when big numbers are involved (I suspect it's more due to PM and ordering results and such rather than OS X). PM's "find" is different, and only finds in open contact sheets. All in all it's pretty poor for doing either.

OTOH, I did a search for all ISO 200 images for one of my cameras, and Houdah Spot (using Spotlight) found 'em in probably less than a second. It only shows the icon, but that's often enough. And thats for thousands, on both boot and external drives. Ditto for just regular ol' Spotlight in macOS.

Graphic Converter has beefed up the browser; you could download the new version and see if it improves things. The find feature is there, but not terribly well implemented, except for saving the searches. There's an Edit>Find... menu, or just start typing in the search box in the menu bar. It works the same as in the finder: enter anything, like xxx, and then you get a results box, and then use the "+" to add criteria (remember to backspace over the "xxx" if necessary), like ISO. Then just hit the save and it's saved in the sidebar. Just like the Finder.

It can move quite fast; I searched in GC in "on this Mac" (all volumes) for like ISO and it was finding and displaying almost as fast as I could scroll, and GC will show a larger preview off to the side for each you select. It's obviously faster if you narrow the criteria. But all Spotlight searches should be faster than you're describing. Are your externals indexed? that might be a problem.

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myotisone Senior Member • Posts: 1,905
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

Andy Hewitt wrote:

I didn't find it made any difference with a smaller catalogue. Surely if you regularly need to search for similar items across different catalogues, then your images are in the wrong catalogues?

Not really, my file storage system setup is based on year, month and day, as this is the most future proof approach. It has remained unchanged since 2003, with me just adding a new folder at the beginning of each year. With LR, and Media Pro, and NeoFinder  this is one big (referenced) catalogue.

Capture One didn't originally have any cataloguing, but they have slowly added it over the years.  Every so often I have tried to use the Capture One catalogue, and had to give up because it was slow and buggy, and  I have adopted several different strategies over the years e.g use LR for cataloguing and C1 for processing.

The C1 catalogue is actually pretty  good now, except that it makes C1 very slow to load, and others have raised search issues when using large catalogues (but others seem to have no problems).   Its more convenient to have an all in one approach for every day editing so I now I have a C1 catalogue for every year, but with a global catalogue for all files in Media Pro (and NeoFinder), for searching and browsing.  As everything I use can read and write to XMP sidecars, I can tag, caption, keyword etc in any of the programs used  in my workflow PhotoMechanic, FRV, LR (not used now), C1, Media Pro or Neofinder.

This works perfectly fine. Media Pro is a brilliant data base, and does everything I want but Phase One are doing their best to mess it up. For example they broke the *.mov playback at the last update (about 18 months ago), acknowledged it was a bug, but still haven't fixed it in the latest release a couple of weeks ago.  Its meant to integrate with C1, but it breaks with every new release of C1, and again its taken Phase One about 18 months to get it working again, just as we must be due for the next C1 upgrade. Hence me looking around for an alternative, but I am struggling to find anything as good as Media Pro.  But when/if Photo Mechanic add their, announced 6 years ago, DAM tools to PM, I will certainly be giving it a try.

Neofinder isn't as good a Media Pro, but it works pretty well for what I want, and better than anything else I have tried (and I have now tried Lyn and GraphicsConverter). Indeed until this thread, I was very happy with what I was using

Cheers,

Graham

myotisone Senior Member • Posts: 1,905
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

robgendreau wrote:

It can move quite fast; I searched in GC in "on this Mac" (all volumes) for like ISO and it was finding and displaying almost as fast as I could scroll, and GC will show a larger preview off to the side for each you select. It's obviously faster if you narrow the criteria. But all Spotlight searches should be faster than you're describing. Are your externals indexed? that might be a problem.

I'm not having a problem with spotlight searches, at least I don't think I am, I am having a problem with the speed of thumbnail rendering.

As I said thumbnails render instantly with Media Pro and Neofinder, but are slow to very slow to render with all the browser type programs I have tried, as soon as  I am trying to browse through a large numbers of thumbnails.

So although, this has been an interesting and useful discussion, I seem to have just confirmed how much better Neofinder and Media Pro are for "my purposes" than the browser type approaches we have been discussing.

None the less, I may well update my copy of GraphicsConverter as I had forgotten how useful it is.

Thanks for your help.

Cheers,

Graham

Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 3,989
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

myotisone wrote:

Andy Hewitt wrote:

I didn't find it made any difference with a smaller catalogue. Surely if you regularly need to search for similar items across different catalogues, then your images are in the wrong catalogues?

Not really, my file storage system setup is based on year, month and day, as this is the most future proof approach. It has remained unchanged since 2003, with me just adding a new folder at the beginning of each year. With LR, and Media Pro, and NeoFinder this is one big (referenced) catalogue.

Understood. I also use a similar backup system of storage, keeping a set of untouched master images on a separate drive (since 2001).

Capture One didn't originally have any cataloguing, but they have slowly added it over the years. Every so often I have tried to use the Capture One catalogue, and had to give up because it was slow and buggy, and I have adopted several different strategies over the years e.g use LR for cataloguing and C1 for processing.

The C1 catalogue is actually pretty good now, except that it makes C1 very slow to load, and others have raised search issues when using large catalogues (but others seem to have no problems). Its more convenient to have an all in one approach for every day editing so I now I have a C1 catalogue for every year, but with a global catalogue for all files in Media Pro (and NeoFinder), for searching and browsing. As everything I use can read and write to XMP sidecars, I can tag, caption, keyword etc in any of the programs used in my workflow PhotoMechanic, FRV, LR (not used now), C1, Media Pro or Neofinder.

This works perfectly fine. Media Pro is a brilliant data base, and does everything I want but Phase One are doing their best to mess it up. For example they broke the *.mov playback at the last update (about 18 months ago), acknowledged it was a bug, but still haven't fixed it in the latest release a couple of weeks ago. Its meant to integrate with C1, but it breaks with every new release of C1, and again its taken Phase One about 18 months to get it working again, just as we must be due for the next C1 upgrade. Hence me looking around for an alternative, but I am struggling to find anything as good as Media Pro. But when/if Photo Mechanic add their, announced 6 years ago, DAM tools to PM, I will certainly be giving it a try.

Neofinder isn't as good a Media Pro, but it works pretty well for what I want, and better than anything else I have tried (and I have now tried Lyn and GraphicsConverter). Indeed until this thread, I was very happy with what I was using

All fair enough. I understand now, having a similar folder layout, I sometimes browse it to find accidentally deleted images in my working locations, but as I also use similar matching date related system in Photos, it's very easy to find the original masters.

So, it still all says that even with spending money (a fair bit in some cases), it doesn't guarantee a fast, reliable and fully featured solution.

That's pretty much why I've ended up with Photos, it's certainly not perfect, but lately it's become more reliable, and it has all the features I need as far as management and searching goes. Even the edit tools are good enough for 'quick and dirty' adjustments, and with the extensions available, can be as good as anything else out there.

All the best

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Andy Hewitt

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myotisone Senior Member • Posts: 1,905
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

Andy Hewitt wrote:

So, it still all says that even with spending money (a fair bit in some cases), it doesn't guarantee a fast, reliable and fully featured solution.

That's pretty much why I've ended up with Photos, it's certainly not perfect, but lately it's become more reliable, and it has all the features I need as far as management and searching goes. Even the edit tools are good enough for 'quick and dirty' adjustments, and with the extensions available, can be as good as anything else out there.

I think this applies to all too many things , and at some stage you need to decide that this is where you are going to stay, and push whatever you have to its limits, and accept some compromise.

I suspect that Photos is a good option, as it seems reasonable that it will only get better.

Cheers,

Graham

Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 3,989
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

myotisone wrote:

Andy Hewitt wrote:

So, it still all says that even with spending money (a fair bit in some cases), it doesn't guarantee a fast, reliable and fully featured solution.

That's pretty much why I've ended up with Photos, it's certainly not perfect, but lately it's become more reliable, and it has all the features I need as far as management and searching goes. Even the edit tools are good enough for 'quick and dirty' adjustments, and with the extensions available, can be as good as anything else out there.

I think this applies to all too many things , and at some stage you need to decide that this is where you are going to stay, and push whatever you have to its limits, and accept some compromise.

Aye.

I suspect that Photos is a good option, as it seems reasonable that it will only get better.

That is my cunning plan of course :-).

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Andy Hewitt

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myotisone Senior Member • Posts: 1,905
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

Andy Hewitt wrote:

That is my cunning plan of course :-).

But, is it "As cunning as a fox who's just been appointed Professor of Cunning at Oxford University?"

Though I don't think Baldrick/Blackadder were too concerned about managing digital assetts at the time.

Cheers,

Graham

Andy Hewitt Veteran Member • Posts: 3,989
Re: NeoFinder turns out to be a great DAM solution

myotisone wrote:

Andy Hewitt wrote:

That is my cunning plan of course :-).

But, is it "As cunning as a fox who's just been appointed Professor of Cunning at Oxford University?"

Yes, it's that cunning my lord.

Though I don't think Baldrick/Blackadder were too concerned about managing digital assetts at the time.

LOL, I'm sure not, perhaps in the futuristic edition

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Andy Hewitt

 Andy Hewitt's gear list:Andy Hewitt's gear list
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