Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

Started Jul 7, 2017 | Discussions
Paulo Alberto
Paulo Alberto Junior Member • Posts: 34
Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

Hello, has anyone ever had problems with the central focus point of the d750? If I'm in AFS-S and I choose any point other than the central one the camera focuses very fast. But if I choose the center point (image) the camera hunts the focus for an exaggerated time and sometimes fails to focus.

Has anyone had anything similar on the d750? I'm going crazy with this.

Nikon D750
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Ernie Misner
Ernie Misner Veteran Member • Posts: 4,698
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.
1

I have not had that problem but you might try a re-set of the camera and check the firmware for updates just for something to try.

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photoreddi Veteran Member • Posts: 7,973
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.
2

Paulo Alberto wrote:

Hello, has anyone ever had problems with the central focus point of the d750? If I'm in AFS-S and I choose any point other than the central one the camera focuses very fast. But if I choose the center point (image) the camera hunts the focus for an exaggerated time and sometimes fails to focus.

Has anyone had anything similar on the d750? I'm going crazy with this.

A relatively large piece of debris may be blocking the central part of the D750's phase detect module. If so, a couple of blasts from a blower bulb may be able to dislodge it.

This is a picture of the PDAF module from Nikon's D3 :

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond3

.

If you don't already have a blower bulb they're very inexpensive. Here's a link to several that includes some that sell for between $7 and $10.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?sts=ma&setNs=p_PRICE_2%7c0&Ns=p_PRICE_2%7c0&srtclk=sort&N=0&Ntt=blower%20bulb

Paulo Alberto
OP Paulo Alberto Junior Member • Posts: 34
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

Thanks for the answer. Makes a lot of sense, I'm going to buy a bulb and try this

Paulo Alberto
OP Paulo Alberto Junior Member • Posts: 34
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

photoreddi wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

Hello, has anyone ever had problems with the central focus point of the d750? If I'm in AFS-S and I choose any point other than the central one the camera focuses very fast. But if I choose the center point (image) the camera hunts the focus for an exaggerated time and sometimes fails to focus.

Has anyone had anything similar on the d750? I'm going crazy with this.

A relatively large piece of debris may be blocking the central part of the D750's phase detect module. If so, a couple of blasts from a blower bulb may be able to dislodge it.

This is a picture of the PDAF module from Nikon's D3 :

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond3

.

If you don't already have a blower bulb they're very inexpensive. Here's a link to several that includes some that sell for between $7 and $10.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?sts=ma&setNs=p_PRICE_2%7c0&Ns=p_PRICE_2%7c0&srtclk=sort&N=0&Ntt=blower%20bulb

OMG it worked !!!!!! thanks so much, you are a life saver.

photoreddi Veteran Member • Posts: 7,973
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

Paulo Alberto wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

Hello, has anyone ever had problems with the central focus point of the d750? If I'm in AFS-S and I choose any point other than the central one the camera focuses very fast. But if I choose the center point (image) the camera hunts the focus for an exaggerated time and sometimes fails to focus.

Has anyone had anything similar on the d750? I'm going crazy with this.

A relatively large piece of debris may be blocking the central part of the D750's phase detect module. If so, a couple of blasts from a blower bulb may be able to dislodge it.

This is a picture of the PDAF module from Nikon's D3 :

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond3

.

If you don't already have a blower bulb they're very inexpensive. Here's a link to several that includes some that sell for between $7 and $10.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?sts=ma&setNs=p_PRICE_2%7c0&Ns=p_PRICE_2%7c0&srtclk=sort&N=0&Ntt=blower%20bulb

OMG it worked !!!!!! thanks so much, you are a life saver.

Great, I'm glad that it worked for you. The only thing I don't understand is how you got the bulb so quickly. In your previous reply you said that you intended to buy one but based on the forum reply timestamp you got it before B&H was open for business! !

Paulo Alberto
OP Paulo Alberto Junior Member • Posts: 34
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

photoreddi wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

Hello, has anyone ever had problems with the central focus point of the d750? If I'm in AFS-S and I choose any point other than the central one the camera focuses very fast. But if I choose the center point (image) the camera hunts the focus for an exaggerated time and sometimes fails to focus.

Has anyone had anything similar on the d750? I'm going crazy with this.

A relatively large piece of debris may be blocking the central part of the D750's phase detect module. If so, a couple of blasts from a blower bulb may be able to dislodge it.

This is a picture of the PDAF module from Nikon's D3 :

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond3

.

If you don't already have a blower bulb they're very inexpensive. Here's a link to several that includes some that sell for between $7 and $10.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?sts=ma&setNs=p_PRICE_2%7c0&Ns=p_PRICE_2%7c0&srtclk=sort&N=0&Ntt=blower%20bulb

OMG it worked !!!!!! thanks so much, you are a life saver.

Great, I'm glad that it worked for you. The only thing I don't understand is how you got the bulb so quickly. In your previous reply you said that you intended to buy one but based on the forum reply timestamp you got it before B&H was open for business! !

I used my wife hair dryer. Not my proudest moment, but it was really messing with my mind.  hahaha cant thank you enough sir.

photoreddi Veteran Member • Posts: 7,973
Smart.

Paulo Alberto wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

Hello, has anyone ever had problems with the central focus point of the d750? If I'm in AFS-S and I choose any point other than the central one the camera focuses very fast. But if I choose the center point (image) the camera hunts the focus for an exaggerated time and sometimes fails to focus.

Has anyone had anything similar on the d750? I'm going crazy with this.

A relatively large piece of debris may be blocking the central part of the D750's phase detect module. If so, a couple of blasts from a blower bulb may be able to dislodge it.

This is a picture of the PDAF module from Nikon's D3 :

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond3

.

If you don't already have a blower bulb they're very inexpensive. Here's a link to several that includes some that sell for between $7 and $10.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?sts=ma&setNs=p_PRICE_2%7c0&Ns=p_PRICE_2%7c0&srtclk=sort&N=0&Ntt=blower%20bulb

OMG it worked !!!!!! thanks so much, you are a life saver.

Great, I'm glad that it worked for you. The only thing I don't understand is how you got the bulb so quickly. In your previous reply you said that you intended to buy one but based on the forum reply timestamp you got it before B&H was open for business! !

I used my wife hair dryer. Not my proudest moment, but it was really messing with my mind. hahaha cant thank you enough sir.

Ingenious too. Were I in your situation I'm not sure that I would have considered using a hair dryer unless I tripped over one!. Good thinking, and it saved time and the cost and effort of buying a blower bulb.

Dyun27
Dyun27 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,052
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

Paulo Alberto wrote:

I used my wife hair dryer. Not my proudest moment, but it was really messing with my mind. hahaha cant thank you enough sir.

Good God,.. I hope you put it on "cold" air first. Also, the hair dryer will suck in all the dust around you and blow it straight into your camera. Yeah.... hair dryers have small filters in the back, but I guarantee it picked up some crap along the way and blew it into your D750. Don't ever do it again no matter how desperate you are! Buy a blower bulb with a little air filter attached, if you must, but don't do hair dryers, vacuums, or compressed air. 

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photoreddi Veteran Member • Posts: 7,973
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

Dyun27 wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

I used my wife hair dryer. Not my proudest moment, but it was really messing with my mind. hahaha cant thank you enough sir.

Good God,.. I hope you put it on "cold" air first. Also, the hair dryer will suck in all the dust around you and blow it straight into your camera. Yeah.... hair dryers have small filters in the back, but I guarantee it picked up some crap along the way and blew it into your D750. Don't ever do it again no matter how desperate you are! Buy a blower bulb with a little air filter attached, if you must, but don't do hair dryers, vacuums, or compressed air.

I think that you're completely overstating the negative effect of blowing unfiltered room air into the camera. The amount of airborne particles ("crap") remaining in the camera should be about the same, whether the hair dryer is used for 2 seconds, 2 minutes or 2 hours. It's not as if there's a "crap trap" that retains all of the airborne particles that enters the camera's body/mirror box area. Actually, I think that more particles would remain in the camera that only had its lens removed than one that used a hair dryer to continuously blow out any particles that it had blown inside.

It's also unlikely that the dryer's heater would be turned on, otherwise gloves would have been needed to keep fingers from being burned. That said, my first choice would be to use a clean blower bulb.

Dyun27
Dyun27 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,052
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

photoreddi wrote:

I think that you're completely overstating the negative effect of blowing unfiltered room air into the camera. The amount of airborne particles ("crap") remaining in the camera should be about the same, whether the hair dryer is used for 2 seconds, 2 minutes or 2 hours. It's not as if there's a "crap trap" that retains all of the airborne particles that enters the camera's body/mirror box area. Actually, I think that more particles would remain in the camera that only had its lens removed than one that used a hair dryer to continuously blow out any particles that it had blown inside.

No, I'm not overstating the negative. The camera internals are delicate and if you've ever used a hair dryer, you should know that the air coming out of it is pretty forceful. You're not just blowing stuff off & onto the sensor, but also behind other components.

Also, electronics don't do well in heat, but I'm just going to assume that the OP was smart enough not to use the hot air setting.

It's also unlikely that the dryer's heater would be turned on, otherwise gloves would have been needed to keep fingers from being burned. That said, my first choice would be to use a clean blower bulb.

What? I'm assuming that when his wife is using a hair dryer, she's got it turned to the hot, or at least warm setting, otherwise it will take a lot longer for her hair to dry. As someone with long hair who actually uses a hair dryer daily, I do not burn my hands and don't need gloves to hold it, because the hot air doesn't heat the handle.

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photoreddi Veteran Member • Posts: 7,973
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

Dyun27 wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

I think that you're completely overstating the negative effect of blowing unfiltered room air into the camera. The amount of airborne particles ("crap") remaining in the camera should be about the same, whether the hair dryer is used for 2 seconds, 2 minutes or 2 hours. It's not as if there's a "crap trap" that retains all of the airborne particles that enters the camera's body/mirror box area. Actually, I think that more particles would remain in the camera that only had its lens removed than one that used a hair dryer to continuously blow out any particles that it had blown inside.

No, I'm not overstating the negative. The camera internals are delicate and if you've ever used a hair dryer, you should know that the air coming out of it is pretty forceful. You're not just blowing stuff off & onto the sensor, but also behind other components.

Also, electronics don't do well in heat, but I'm just going to assume that the OP was smart enough not to use the hot air setting.

Silicon semiconductors are highly resistant to heat, probably much more so than any non-metallic parts used in the cameras and lenses such as kapton tape (Nikon uses it in many of their lenses) and flue tape (that's not used in any cameras or lenses that I'm aware of), Kapton tape is rated for use in environments ranging from 500°F to 600°F. Germanium semiconductors are very easily damaged by heat but they're probably not seen much anymore outside of museums.

.

It's also unlikely that the dryer's heater would be turned on, otherwise gloves would have been needed to keep fingers from being burned. That said, my first choice would be to use a clean blower bulb.

What? I'm assuming that when his wife is using a hair dryer, she's got it turned to the hot, or at least warm setting, otherwise it will take a lot longer for her hair to dry. As someone with long hair who actually uses a hair dryer daily, I do not burn my hands and don't need gloves to hold it, because the hot air doesn't heat the handle.

Of course it doesn't have a handle, but neither does the camera have a handle. One should assume that the camera was held by fingers, not by tongs.

Dyun27
Dyun27 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,052
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

photoreddi wrote:

Silicon semiconductors are highly resistant to heat, probably much more so than any non-metallic parts used in the cameras and lenses such as kapton tape (Nikon uses it in many of their lenses) and flue tape (that's not used in any cameras or lenses that I'm aware of), Kapton tape is rated for use in environments ranging from 500°F to 600°F. Germanium semiconductors are very easily damaged by heat but they're probably not seen much anymore outside of museums.

The recommended max operating temp for the D750 is 104 degrees Fahrenheit. I'm sure it can withstand slightly hotter temperatures, but there's a reason for the recommendation.

Of course it doesn't have a handle, but neither does the camera have a handle. One should assume that the camera was held by fingers, not by tongs.

I would hope that the OP didn't keep it on for longer than a few seconds, and certainly hope he had is set to a cooler setting than scorching hot. Maybe he had it set on a table. We don't know. That's getting into too much detail already.

My only point is - Don't use a blow dryer to clean your camera internals! -

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photoreddi Veteran Member • Posts: 7,973
And so it goes...

Dyun27 wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Silicon semiconductors are highly resistant to heat, probably much more so than any non-metallic parts used in the cameras and lenses such as kapton tape (Nikon uses it in many of their lenses) and flue tape (that's not used in any cameras or lenses that I'm aware of), Kapton tape is rated for use in environments ranging from 500°F to 600°F. Germanium semiconductors are very easily damaged by heat but they're probably not seen much anymore outside of museums.

The recommended max operating temp for the D750 is 104 degrees Fahrenheit. I'm sure it can withstand slightly hotter temperatures, but there's a reason for the recommendation.

Yes, but you apparently don't understand not only that cameras can safely operate at much higher temperatures than 104 degrees F, but that cameras aren't being operated when the lens is removed and much hotter air is being blown into the camera for short periods. You seem to be reasonably intelligent so if you continue to disagree it's reasonable to conclude that further conversation would be futile, not because you don't understand but because you _won't_ understand. That is, it doesn't bother you that being recognized as a troll is preferable to conceding that you were wrong.

Kbobb1 Regular Member • Posts: 159
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.
1

photoreddi wrote:

Dyun27 wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

I used my wife hair dryer. Not my proudest moment, but it was really messing with my mind. hahaha cant thank you enough sir.

Good God,.. I hope you put it on "cold" air first. Also, the hair dryer will suck in all the dust around you and blow it straight into your camera. Yeah.... hair dryers have small filters in the back, but I guarantee it picked up some crap along the way and blew it into your D750. Don't ever do it again no matter how desperate you are! Buy a blower bulb with a little air filter attached, if you must, but don't do hair dryers, vacuums, or compressed air.

I think that you're completely overstating the negative effect of blowing unfiltered room air into the camera. The amount of airborne particles ("crap") remaining in the camera should be about the same, whether the hair dryer is used for 2 seconds, 2 minutes or 2 hours. It's not as if there's a "crap trap" that retains all of the airborne particles that enters the camera's body/mirror box area. Actually, I think that more particles would remain in the camera that only had its lens removed than one that used a hair dryer to continuously blow out any particles that it had blown inside.

It's also unlikely that the dryer's heater would be turned on, otherwise gloves would have been needed to keep fingers from being burned. That said, my first choice would be to use a clean blower bulb.

If the blow dryer doesn't bother you maybe you'll try this method:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xj1FlL-iAo

photoreddi Veteran Member • Posts: 7,973
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

Kbobb1 wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Dyun27 wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

I used my wife hair dryer. Not my proudest moment, but it was really messing with my mind. hahaha cant thank you enough sir.

Good God,.. I hope you put it on "cold" air first. Also, the hair dryer will suck in all the dust around you and blow it straight into your camera. Yeah.... hair dryers have small filters in the back, but I guarantee it picked up some crap along the way and blew it into your D750. Don't ever do it again no matter how desperate you are! Buy a blower bulb with a little air filter attached, if you must, but don't do hair dryers, vacuums, or compressed air.

I think that you're completely overstating the negative effect of blowing unfiltered room air into the camera. The amount of airborne particles ("crap") remaining in the camera should be about the same, whether the hair dryer is used for 2 seconds, 2 minutes or 2 hours. It's not as if there's a "crap trap" that retains all of the airborne particles that enters the camera's body/mirror box area. Actually, I think that more particles would remain in the camera that only had its lens removed than one that used a hair dryer to continuously blow out any particles that it had blown inside.

It's also unlikely that the dryer's heater would be turned on, otherwise gloves would have been needed to keep fingers from being burned. That said, my first choice would be to use a clean blower bulb.

If the blow dryer doesn't bother you maybe you'll try this method:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xj1FlL-iAo

Nope, I won't and can't try because I stopped the video after no more than a second or two once I saw that it was one of The Angry Photographer's videos. If you're a TAP fan what can I say other than it takes all kinds. TAP videos have only a very little more credibility with me than tweets from The Angry POTUS.

Kbobb1 Regular Member • Posts: 159
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

photoreddi wrote:

Kbobb1 wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Dyun27 wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

I used my wife hair dryer. Not my proudest moment, but it was really messing with my mind. hahaha cant thank you enough sir.

Good God,.. I hope you put it on "cold" air first. Also, the hair dryer will suck in all the dust around you and blow it straight into your camera. Yeah.... hair dryers have small filters in the back, but I guarantee it picked up some crap along the way and blew it into your D750. Don't ever do it again no matter how desperate you are! Buy a blower bulb with a little air filter attached, if you must, but don't do hair dryers, vacuums, or compressed air.

I think that you're completely overstating the negative effect of blowing unfiltered room air into the camera. The amount of airborne particles ("crap") remaining in the camera should be about the same, whether the hair dryer is used for 2 seconds, 2 minutes or 2 hours. It's not as if there's a "crap trap" that retains all of the airborne particles that enters the camera's body/mirror box area. Actually, I think that more particles would remain in the camera that only had its lens removed than one that used a hair dryer to continuously blow out any particles that it had blown inside.

It's also unlikely that the dryer's heater would be turned on, otherwise gloves would have been needed to keep fingers from being burned. That said, my first choice would be to use a clean blower bulb.

If the blow dryer doesn't bother you maybe you'll try this method:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xj1FlL-iAo

Nope, I won't and can't try because I stopped the video after no more than a second or two once I saw that it was one of The Angry Photographer's videos. If you're a TAP fan what can I say other than it takes all kinds. TAP videos have only a very little more credibility with me than tweets from The Angry POTUS.

Dude - it's a joke, laugh a little.  And no, i am not a fan of TAP or any other human.

photoreddi Veteran Member • Posts: 7,973
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

Kbobb1 wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Kbobb1 wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Dyun27 wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

I used my wife hair dryer. Not my proudest moment, but it was really messing with my mind. hahaha cant thank you enough sir.

Good God,.. I hope you put it on "cold" air first. Also, the hair dryer will suck in all the dust around you and blow it straight into your camera. Yeah.... hair dryers have small filters in the back, but I guarantee it picked up some crap along the way and blew it into your D750. Don't ever do it again no matter how desperate you are! Buy a blower bulb with a little air filter attached, if you must, but don't do hair dryers, vacuums, or compressed air.

I think that you're completely overstating the negative effect of blowing unfiltered room air into the camera. The amount of airborne particles ("crap") remaining in the camera should be about the same, whether the hair dryer is used for 2 seconds, 2 minutes or 2 hours. It's not as if there's a "crap trap" that retains all of the airborne particles that enters the camera's body/mirror box area. Actually, I think that more particles would remain in the camera that only had its lens removed than one that used a hair dryer to continuously blow out any particles that it had blown inside.

It's also unlikely that the dryer's heater would be turned on, otherwise gloves would have been needed to keep fingers from being burned. That said, my first choice would be to use a clean blower bulb.

If the blow dryer doesn't bother you maybe you'll try this method:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xj1FlL-iAo

Nope, I won't and can't try because I stopped the video after no more than a second or two once I saw that it was one of The Angry Photographer's videos. If you're a TAP fan what can I say other than it takes all kinds. TAP videos have only a very little more credibility with me than tweets from The Angry POTUS.

Dude - it's a joke, laugh a little. And no, i am not a fan of TAP or any other human.

How would I discover that it was a joke? I thought that I was pretty clear about my opinion of TAP and why I choose to ignore his videos. That you didn't identify the video as being one of TAP's (no clue in the URL you posted) was the joke supposed to be "Ha Ha, I made you watch a TAP video!"?

That's pretty lame if you ask me. I also have a fairly low opinion of people that have "Dude" as part of their working vocabulary but that doesn't surprise me at all. Are you also an Angry POTUS fan?

Kbobb1 Regular Member • Posts: 159
Re: Nikon D750 focus issue. Weird issue.

photoreddi wrote:

Kbobb1 wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Kbobb1 wrote:

photoreddi wrote:

Dyun27 wrote:

Paulo Alberto wrote:

I used my wife hair dryer. Not my proudest moment, but it was really messing with my mind. hahaha cant thank you enough sir.

Good God,.. I hope you put it on "cold" air first. Also, the hair dryer will suck in all the dust around you and blow it straight into your camera. Yeah.... hair dryers have small filters in the back, but I guarantee it picked up some crap along the way and blew it into your D750. Don't ever do it again no matter how desperate you are! Buy a blower bulb with a little air filter attached, if you must, but don't do hair dryers, vacuums, or compressed air.

I think that you're completely overstating the negative effect of blowing unfiltered room air into the camera. The amount of airborne particles ("crap") remaining in the camera should be about the same, whether the hair dryer is used for 2 seconds, 2 minutes or 2 hours. It's not as if there's a "crap trap" that retains all of the airborne particles that enters the camera's body/mirror box area. Actually, I think that more particles would remain in the camera that only had its lens removed than one that used a hair dryer to continuously blow out any particles that it had blown inside.

It's also unlikely that the dryer's heater would be turned on, otherwise gloves would have been needed to keep fingers from being burned. That said, my first choice would be to use a clean blower bulb.

If the blow dryer doesn't bother you maybe you'll try this method:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xj1FlL-iAo

Nope, I won't and can't try because I stopped the video after no more than a second or two once I saw that it was one of The Angry Photographer's videos. If you're a TAP fan what can I say other than it takes all kinds. TAP videos have only a very little more credibility with me than tweets from The Angry POTUS.

Dude - it's a joke, laugh a little. And no, i am not a fan of TAP or any other human.

I also have a fairly low opinion of people that have "Dude" as part of their working vocabulary but that doesn't surprise me at all.

you know what opinions are like...everyone has one and they all stink.

Are you also an Angry POTUS fan?

the answer is in the last sentence of my previous post which you either didn't read or don't understand.

Dyun27
Dyun27 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,052
Re: And so it goes...

photoreddi wrote:

Yes, but you apparently don't understand not only that cameras can safely operate at much higher temperatures than 104 degrees F, but that cameras aren't being operated when the lens is removed and much hotter air is being blown into the camera for short periods. You seem to be reasonably intelligent so if you continue to disagree it's reasonable to conclude that further conversation would be futile, not because you don't understand but because you _won't_ understand. That is, it doesn't bother you that being recognized as a troll is preferable to conceding that you were wrong.

OK, you go ahead and use a blow dryer on your cameras if you want, but I'll continue to advise against it anytime anyone brings it up.

Maybe you're also not against using paper tissues on your sensor, or rubbing alcohol to clean the exterior. Whatever floats your boat,... but you won't find me recommending any of these methods. I like to solve problems, not create new issues.

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