DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

Started May 30, 2017 | Questions
Elapid
Elapid New Member • Posts: 8
DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"
1

I hope I'm not just rehashing a question that has already been asked and answered a million times, especially on my first post in the forums...

I have a Canon Rebel T3i and a Canon EOS 7D Mark II. Primarily, I do nature photography, with lots of super telephoto shooting, down to a poor man's macro lens. I have done some video, I want to do more, I know the picture quality on both cameras is excellent, but... the sound. The 7D Mark II actually has built-in stereo microphones, but, they're still built-in, pick up equipment noise, and aren't exactly great for long-range recording. I want to pick up relatively quiet ambient sounds, like bird calls in the woods.

A few months ago, after seeing it recommended by lots of DSLR videographers as a less expensive, but still pretty good quality alternative to Rode or Senheiser, I got myself an Azden SMX-30 Powered Stereo/Mono Shotgun Video Microphone  (link for specs). I've been impressed by the quality of the audio but for one thing... the thing that seems to plague every DSLR video newbie who ever plugged an external mic into their camera...

...hisssssssssssssssssss...

I use the +20 dB gain booster. I go into my Mark II's (and Rebel's!) video sound settings, switch from auto to manual, and fidget with the audio level. If it's low enough to get rid of the pre amp hiss, then it's low enough that the remaining sound is barely audible, even listening through a pair of (very aged, but still good) Bose headphones plugged in. Downloading the video through the EOS Utility and playing it on my PC doesn't seem to do any better. I feel stuck between, "Great audio! Can barely hear it, though," and, "Audio would be great if it wasn't for that pre amp hiss."

Is anyone out there, without using Magic Lantern, managing to get decent, more distant/quiet ambient audio with an external mic, without that stupid hiss?

 Elapid's gear list:Elapid's gear list
Canon EOS 600D Canon EOS 7D Mark II Canon EF-S 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 IS STM Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD Canon EF 50mm F1.8 II +3 more
ANSWER:
Canon EOS 600D (EOS Rebel T3i / EOS Kiss X5) Canon EOS 7D Mark II
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
NickZ2016 Contributing Member • Posts: 915
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

Certainly not an expert but once it's on the computer can't you raise the volume with your editing software?

 NickZ2016's gear list:NickZ2016's gear list
Nikon D800 Tamron 15-30mm F2.8 Tamron SP 24-70mm F2.8 Di VC USD Tamron SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28mm f/1.8G +4 more
UncleBobsPhotography Forum Member • Posts: 95
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

I'm also interested in any potential answers here. The hissing when using an external microphone has made me doubt if it's any improvement at all. I have ended up using a Tascam DR-10 or Zoom H1 to get rid of it, but it would make my life easier if I didn't have to use an external recorder.

 UncleBobsPhotography's gear list:UncleBobsPhotography's gear list
Sony RX1R II Panasonic GH5
Alan_W1 Senior Member • Posts: 1,531
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"
2

Difficult to comment with anything valuable, as the camera/mic combinations I use, and the types of habitat I tend to shoot video in, along with the ambient sounds I encounter {which may effectively mask any potential audio hiss}, are likely to be somewhat different to you.

In many of my wildlife/nature/telephoto video shooting circumstances, suppressing wind to an ideal level, tends to be more of an issue for me than audio gain hiss...due mainly to the exposed nature of my local landscape {coast/moorland/hills etc}.

In quieter habitats, such as sheltered/wooded valleys in my region, I am usually always within earshot of running water or rustling leaves {and in spring/summer, the constant hiss of insect life etc can be quite loud}.....all of which would mask any potential audio hiss issues.

A simplistic solution would be to deliberately restrict/choose your nature/wildlife video shooting {"IF" real-time audio is absolutely essential}, to such situations where constant ambient sounds overpower any significant hiss.

You could also possibly mask your hiss issue, in the same way that I sometimes am forced to mask wind issues, by applying a suitable background soundtrack to your finished video's, at an audio level which subdues the hiss...but still allows the natural sounds through....this is a far less restrictive way of working.

Possibly someone more skilled in the audio editing department than myself, would be able to separate the hiss in post...as another option {don't know how effective that is, assuming it can be done }.

With regards to bird song/calls, I tend to find that they are very directional in nature {intensity being dependant on the direction their heads are facing}, with some species vocals able to travel quite long distances with high intensity {gulls/cuckoos/wrens/some waders etc}...so should be no problem for capturing strong audio with those {high enough above a small level of audio hiss for it to be less of an issue}.

The quieter species in my region will require getting the mic as close as possible {this includes me, as my mic is fitted to either my lens hood/hotshoe or tripod head}, but the ambient sounds may still dictate whether the subjects song/call is able to be recorded separate/strong enough from the ambient sound etc.

I have two microphones, one being the Rode VideoMic Pro, and the other being a Rode VideoMicro....and the latter one does have more of a hiss than the former, in a quiet/indoor environment {with the in-camera gain of my Panasonic G80 turned right down}...but fortunately for me, I can increase the gain substantially before hiss becomes noticeable in many of my outdoor shooting circumstances.

I have previously used a Zoom H1, and would often carry this with me when not shooting video, but just checking potential area's out, prior to shooting. I found it useful for building up a collection of close range bird song audio for future dubbing use...when the original audio is ruined by "the hand of man" etc....so that may be another tool in the bag.

The main problem with that method is that it is mainly suited to general ambience soundtrack use, and not if it is to be used when the video is exclusively of a specific bird calling...as this will require the actual real-time audio {to sync the audio to the beak movements}.

Often mentioned, and It does appear to be true {especially for me}......audio is an extremely complex area.

The best I can do is muddle through with trial and error, using the gear I own, in the situations I tend to shoot in {which is probably the best way for me, in the end}....as we each shoot wildlife/nature in unique situations.

 Alan_W1's gear list:Alan_W1's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-G6 Panasonic G85 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-45mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS Panasonic Lumix G Vario 45-150mm F4-5.6 ASPH Mega OIS +11 more
shah stlz
shah stlz Forum Member • Posts: 64
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"
3

There's a general rule with audio you should follow:

Get the audio level as high as possible without clipping. If your loudest volumes (like the bird you record) are about -10 to -6dB, that's about perfect. You then still have 6dB headroom for unexpected louder sounds (it clips at 0dB).

In your case, first switch the Azden mcrophone to +20dB, to get more level from the mic. Then adjust the camera preamp so that the loudest sounds do not exceed -6dB.

It's a bit like with getting the exposure correct: If you record too low levels then of course you can raise them. But it's like underexposing and then pulling it all back. The quaility suffers. Clipping in audio is even worse, as you don't only get details back, but it sounds horrible if it's digital clipping.

Once your levels are set ok and the hiss is still audible, check the cable. Bad connection is hiss cause #2 (#1 is bad levels).

If you like: It would be helpful if you could give us the audio file. The way your hiss sounds might tell something more about the problem.

-- hide signature --

// shah-stlz.tumblr.com //

UncleBobsPhotography Forum Member • Posts: 95
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

Alan_W1 wrote:

The main problem with that method is that it is mainly suited to general ambience soundtrack use, and not if it is to be used when the video is exclusively of a specific bird calling...as this will require the actual real-time audio {to sync the audio to the beak movements}.

Just as a note in case you're not aware of it, syncing audio in post is trivial in with Adobe Premiere if you have a weak soundtrack from the camera and a good off-camera recorder. The software can sync the two soundtracks automatically and you don't have to use visual cues.

 UncleBobsPhotography's gear list:UncleBobsPhotography's gear list
Sony RX1R II Panasonic GH5
ZX11
ZX11 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,886
Shotgun mics

Isn't the shotgun mic designed to eliminate background/environmental sounds that are off center of the interview subject? Great for catching people talking (selfie vloggers) but less so for recording an environment full of birds.

You are probably trying to pull up sounds of birds off center that the mic is designed to suppress. Try a cartiod (spelling?) mic for 360 degree sound capture. Or, the Zoom H4n Pro with a shotgun mic on one channel and a cartiod mic on another channel.  Then mix the channels as you like for best sounds of your subject and the environment.

-- hide signature --

"Very funny, Scotty! Now beam me down my clothes."
"He's dead, Jim! You grab his tri-corder. I'll get his wallet."

 ZX11's gear list:ZX11's gear list
Canon EOS 700D Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM
shah stlz
shah stlz Forum Member • Posts: 64
Re: Shotgun mics

ZX11 wrote:

Isn't the shotgun mic designed to eliminate background/environmental sounds that are off center of the interview subject? Great for catching people talking (selfie vloggers) but less so for recording an environment full of birds.

You are probably trying to pull up sounds of birds off center that the mic is designed to suppress. Try a cartiod (spelling?) mic for 360 degree sound capture. Or, the Zoom H4n Pro with a shotgun mic on one channel and a cartiod mic on another channel.

That's why we need the audio file. Is the hiss just pushed background sounds or is it preamp noise? Sounds totally different. Let's hear!

-- hide signature --

// shah-stlz.tumblr.com //

Alan_W1 Senior Member • Posts: 1,531
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"
1

UncleBobsPhotography wrote:

Alan_W1 wrote:

The main problem with that method is that it is mainly suited to general ambience soundtrack use, and not if it is to be used when the video is exclusively of a specific bird calling...as this will require the actual real-time audio {to sync the audio to the beak movements}.

Just as a note in case you're not aware of it, syncing audio in post is trivial in with Adobe Premiere if you have a weak soundtrack from the camera and a good off-camera recorder. The software can sync the two soundtracks automatically and you don't have to use visual cues.

Yes, I am aware of that, although I probably didn't explain what I meant very well.

If recording the audio call of a particular bird with a recorder, it would be unusual to be able to sync this up seamlessly to a different bird of the same species calling.... even though they may have the same apparent call.

Therefore the audio taken via a separate recorder on a different occasion to the actual video footage concerned, may be best suited for general ambience soundtrack purposes.

 Alan_W1's gear list:Alan_W1's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-G6 Panasonic G85 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-45mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS Panasonic Lumix G Vario 45-150mm F4-5.6 ASPH Mega OIS +11 more
Andrew S10 Contributing Member • Posts: 908
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

The hiss is a result of bad in-camera preamps and cranking the levels. You can try minimizing the hiss with Audacity, but it might affect sounds that you want to keep.

Many people use audio recorders as preamps to bypass poor camera preamps, but it won't necessarily solve your hiss issue, since the mic is receiving a weak signal due to distance and low sensitivity.

Mics function best when they are close to the subject, even shotgun mics are intended to be in close proximity. Don't expect stellar results with a shotgun mic, it's really the wrong tool for the job. A parabolic mic is the right tool for the job, but they're very expensive.

Erwin_H New Member • Posts: 1
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

The hiss you hear is the difference between the input signal and the noise level of the preamps. Gaining your signal will increase the input signal but the noise level as well.

There are a few options to lower the noise level in your output.
1: Increase the volume of the source by getting your mic closer to the source.
2: Use a mic that you can aim at the source. By using a shotgun mic you can aim at the sounds you want to record.
3: Get a microphone that has a hotter output, so you won't have to gain the signal by much.
4: Get a preamp that has a lower noisefloor.

I have no experience with the Azden SMX-20 but it you can test wether the preamp of your camera's has a lower noisefloor without the +20dB gain at the same signal level.

Personally I'd opt for a external recorder with good preamps, record a basic background environment sound and later add special sounds like chirping birds which you record when you can get closer, with a shotgun mic.

By the way, Magic Lantern won't do you any good in terms of audio quality. The noiselevel from the preamps will still be there.

Alan_W1 Senior Member • Posts: 1,531
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

Andrew S10 wrote:

The hiss is a result of bad in-camera preamps and cranking the levels. You can try minimizing the hiss with Audacity, but it might affect sounds that you want to keep.

Many people use audio recorders as preamps to bypass poor camera preamps, but it won't necessarily solve your hiss issue, since the mic is receiving a weak signal due to distance and low sensitivity.

Mics function best when they are close to the subject, even shotgun mics are intended to be in close proximity. Don't expect stellar results with a shotgun mic, it's really the wrong tool for the job. A parabolic mic is the right tool for the job, but they're very expensive.

From a UK perspective, and based on my observations, parabolic mics tend to be used mainly for research purposes {university projects, and the larger wildlife trusts, to aid species counts} and are clearly well suited for that audio purpose.

Subjects as small as many species of bird require relatively close shooting distances, for reasonable image sizes {even with super teles}, so decent shotguns can be an ideal compromise for both mobility and audio...although as the price/quality range increases, I suspect the audio quality/capability does too....along with the camera combination.

Personally speaking, I don't think it is as clear cut as a right/wrong tool for the job, as nature is extremely variable....but just my humble opinion, based on my own experiences.

 Alan_W1's gear list:Alan_W1's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-G6 Panasonic G85 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-45mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS Panasonic Lumix G Vario 45-150mm F4-5.6 ASPH Mega OIS +11 more
ejkrouse
ejkrouse Junior Member • Posts: 45
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

Erwin_H has the best advice so far. Our camera preamps are almost vestigial, and it's much better to go with a separate system.

This site has a great breakdown of what goes on in the world of audio:

Creative Field Recording

Audio is a scary place! And talk about a whole new chapter of Gear Acquisition Syndrome. Lusting after Canon red or Nikon gold is nothing after you've seen Neumann champagne or Schoeps blue. I don't even look at Sound Devices anymore; it just makes me sad.

I've been having a great time with my Zoom H1 (wait for a deal on B&H when they're $70-80). It's a dumb plastic XY recorder with a 1/4-20 mount on the bottom. Cheap enough to get knocked around without care- I gaff tape mine to rafters and bar stools to record my bands. It's also tiny, maybe the size of a pair of sunglasses folded up. The audio files are decent, and worlds better than onboard DSLR audio. We have maybe 4 of them floating around in my musician circles here, and we're always remarking how good it sounds. Mine's always with me, just in case. Better than nothing! And WAAY better than my D7100's onboard.

I just looked and Lensrentals has a great Audio section. Maybe worth it to rent before you decide to splash out on something?

I'm a few Shutterstock payouts from a field recorder. Considering the F4 from Zoom. Not to derail, but anyone have suggestions? 2 channels, min. I see a rental 702 in my future.

 ejkrouse's gear list:ejkrouse's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D Nikon AF-S Micro-Nikkor 105mm F2.8G IF-ED VR Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Art
Elapid
OP Elapid New Member • Posts: 8
Re: Shotgun mics

shah stlz wrote:

ZX11 wrote:

Isn't the shotgun mic designed to eliminate background/environmental sounds that are off center of the interview subject? Great for catching people talking (selfie vloggers) but less so for recording an environment full of birds.

You are probably trying to pull up sounds of birds off center that the mic is designed to suppress. Try a cartiod (spelling?) mic for 360 degree sound capture. Or, the Zoom H4n Pro with a shotgun mic on one channel and a cartiod mic on another channel.

That's why we need the audio file. Is the hiss just pushed background sounds or is it preamp noise? Sounds totally different. Let's hear!

It definitely seems like pre amp noise. There's a dedicated headphone jack, so I can live monitor the audio coming in. If I turn the levels up, it becomes more noticeable, especially in quieter environments.

What would be the best way to provide audio? Link to a video on YouTube? Can I insert an audio file? Again, sorry for the noob questions, this is seriously the first time I've actually posted anything instead of just lurking the forums hoping someone's already answered questions I have (they usually have)

 Elapid's gear list:Elapid's gear list
Canon EOS 600D Canon EOS 7D Mark II Canon EF-S 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 IS STM Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD Canon EF 50mm F1.8 II +3 more
Elapid
OP Elapid New Member • Posts: 8
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

shah stlz wrote:

There's a general rule with audio you should follow:

Get the audio level as high as possible without clipping. If your loudest volumes (like the bird you record) are about -10 to -6dB, that's about perfect. You then still have 6dB headroom for unexpected louder sounds (it clips at 0dB).

In your case, first switch the Azden mcrophone to +20dB, to get more level from the mic. Then adjust the camera preamp so that the loudest sounds do not exceed -6dB.

It's a bit like with getting the exposure correct: If you record too low levels then of course you can raise them. But it's like underexposing and then pulling it all back. The quaility suffers. Clipping in audio is even worse, as you don't only get details back, but it sounds horrible if it's digital clipping.

Once your levels are set ok and the hiss is still audible, check the cable. Bad connection is hiss cause #2 (#1 is bad levels).

If you like: It would be helpful if you could give us the audio file. The way your hiss sounds might tell something more about the problem.

Thankfully, the 7D Mark II actually shows audio levels during shooting, so , that's rather easy to observe. I've had the microphone's +20dB on constantly specifically trying to overcome the hiss. I'll try to shoot some video in the next couple of days and fiddle with the levels (and get some hiss captured).

As for raising the sound levels in post, would this affect the quality of the sound? And, would a free program like Audacity be sufficient for this?

Thank you so much for the response!

 Elapid's gear list:Elapid's gear list
Canon EOS 600D Canon EOS 7D Mark II Canon EF-S 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 IS STM Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD Canon EF 50mm F1.8 II +3 more
Elapid
OP Elapid New Member • Posts: 8
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

ejkrouse wrote:

Erwin_H has the best advice so far. Our camera preamps are almost vestigial, and it's much better to go with a separate system.

This site has a great breakdown of what goes on in the world of audio:

Creative Field Recording

Audio is a scary place! And talk about a whole new chapter of Gear Acquisition Syndrome. Lusting after Canon red or Nikon gold is nothing after you've seen Neumann champagne or Schoeps blue. I don't even look at Sound Devices anymore; it just makes me sad.

I've been having a great time with my Zoom H1 (wait for a deal on B&H when they're $70-80). It's a dumb plastic XY recorder with a 1/4-20 mount on the bottom. Cheap enough to get knocked around without care- I gaff tape mine to rafters and bar stools to record my bands. It's also tiny, maybe the size of a pair of sunglasses folded up. The audio files are decent, and worlds better than onboard DSLR audio. We have maybe 4 of them floating around in my musician circles here, and we're always remarking how good it sounds. Mine's always with me, just in case. Better than nothing! And WAAY better than my D7100's onboard.

I just looked and Lensrentals has a great Audio section. Maybe worth it to rent before you decide to splash out on something?

I'm a few Shutterstock payouts from a field recorder. Considering the F4 from Zoom. Not to derail, but anyone have suggestions? 2 channels, min. I see a rental 702 in my future.

The audio is kind of scary! Mostly because I have relatively little experience with it. I've spent loads of time consulting teh Googles, running around looking at forum posts here, and on B&H, Digital Photography School, and a number of DSLR video sites run by people that seem quite experience. Everyone and their dog says, quite reasonably says that getting a separate sound recorder would smash out the hiss from the Mark II's pre-amp (These companies MUST know that more and more people are using DSLRs to shoot video. Why is there not an option to just switch the dumb thing off?). Right now, the price tag is a bit of a deterrent, but also the fact that I don't even know what to look for in a good sound recorder.

 Elapid's gear list:Elapid's gear list
Canon EOS 600D Canon EOS 7D Mark II Canon EF-S 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 IS STM Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD Canon EF 50mm F1.8 II +3 more
Elapid
OP Elapid New Member • Posts: 8
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

Andrew S10 wrote:

The hiss is a result of bad in-camera preamps and cranking the levels. You can try minimizing the hiss with Audacity, but it might affect sounds that you want to keep.

Many people use audio recorders as preamps to bypass poor camera preamps, but it won't necessarily solve your hiss issue, since the mic is receiving a weak signal due to distance and low sensitivity.

Mics function best when they are close to the subject, even shotgun mics are intended to be in close proximity. Don't expect stellar results with a shotgun mic, it's really the wrong tool for the job. A parabolic mic is the right tool for the job, but they're very expensive.

I'm sorry for my slow replies, life is hectic right now. Quieter things I'm trying to record are things like the ice booming and groaning on a lake (which isn't always quiet, it's like a cannon shooting, sometimes), and just general bird call ambience. The Azden mic has a stereo setting, which I use for these sounds. It has two diaphragms, and, even using them on the stereo setting instead of the longer condenser mic on mono, the distance at which it picks up a wide frequency of sounds is excellent.

Now that I have some time (and have been reminded - it's like a pinball machine inside my head), I'll pop the microphone on my camera, adjust the levels as best I can, and see if I can't drop a link to you all, here.

By the way, thank you all so much for the responses! One of my biggest reasons for hesitating on things like a field recorder or Adobe Premier is budget. I'll go ahead and get some audio so you all can hear the dreaded hiss, and, if there's nothing to be done but get an external recorder, I'll start saving my pennies!

 Elapid's gear list:Elapid's gear list
Canon EOS 600D Canon EOS 7D Mark II Canon EF-S 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 IS STM Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD Canon EF 50mm F1.8 II +3 more
uncle dunc Contributing Member • Posts: 826
Re: DSLR Video, External Mics, and "The Hiss"

An external recorder is definitely the way to go. Camera preamps are noisy, and they record audio at the 16 bit rate. The Zoom has quiet preamps, and the audio is recorded at 24 bits, which is 100 times the resolution of 16 bits. With 24 bit audio, you can leave more headroom so that the boom of the ice cracking doesn't go past zero db and give you digital clipping. Plus, you can boost the gain of the quieter audio in post and it'll sound fine, where if you're boosting 16 bit audio, it starts sounding hashy.

On bird calls, one could record a background track for ambience and then add the shotgun mic track to match the bird in the footage. If the shotgun mic track is noisy, you can put a noise gate on it (or edit the wave forms in Audition) so that the only time the bird call track is audible is when the bird is calling - where the hiss will be masked by the bird call.

 uncle dunc's gear list:uncle dunc's gear list
Panasonic FZ2500 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX85 Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 YI 4K Action Camera Venus Laowa 7.5mm F2 MFT +12 more
Roland Wooster Senior Member • Posts: 2,117
Hissing nightmare

Compared with my Nikon D800E, the Zoom H1's mic is better, and the audio recorder circuit not much different  so  you can then achieve slightly improved audio using it versus the camera mic.

However - some big warnings, I first used a simply metal attachment that converts from a hotshoe to a 1/4" tripod mount - this is bad because any mechanical noise - in particular the auto focus of the camera motor is transmitted to the H1 and recorded clearly - this is worse than the hiss. So you either need to mount the microphone separately, or use some kind of isolation mount - I haven't tested how well that works yet. Or just use MF - same problem with my GH5 too.

Second point, the H1 is not that good, at least mine seems not to be. It's better than my D800 camera mic (which I also think is mono) but it's miles worse than the integrated mics of either my 7 year old Panasonic camcorder, or my new Panasonic GH5's integrated mic. The problem with the H1 is the noise floor (the hiss you mention) is way too high.

It is my belief that the audio circuits of the H1 yield a noise floor of about -33dB which is very clearly audible as hiss - I have tried with some low quality external mics connected to the input of the Zoom and the noise floor was the same - my conclusion being the limiting factor is the Zoom's analogue audio pre-amp circuit, not the mics in the Zoom H1.

That said - mine is so bad I sent it back to Zoom for them to take a look at it, at this point the first response has been "seems to be performing to specs" - I've asked them to actually take a recording and check the noise level, because frankly having an external recorder that's has a noise floor 12dB worse than the built in mic of my Lumix Gh5 is pathetic.

I wonder if Zoom's other recorders have better pre-amps? I would love to be able to use the H1 because the audio sounds nicer, but the hiss is unusable compared with my GH5's integrated mics.

Roland.

-- hide signature --
Pete Silver
Pete Silver Contributing Member • Posts: 818
Re: Hissing nightmare

For something like you want to do the only answer is a shotgun mic to an external recorder. It uses XLR balanced cables that reduce things like hiss. I never use DSLR audio.

I use a Sennheiser K6 mic which I've had for years with a windjammer on it to reduce wind noise. You can also reduce wind noise by keeping the mic close to the ground.

-- hide signature --

Pete Silver

 Pete Silver's gear list:Pete Silver's gear list
Nikon D850 Fujifilm X-H1 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G Nikon AF-S Micro-Nikkor 105mm F2.8G IF-ED VR +2 more
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads