Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

Started Feb 3, 2017 | Discussions
BruceLV Junior Member • Posts: 48
Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

I am new to home printing and have been researching whether to stay with Canon OEM inks or refill my own cartridges using the Precision Color system.  From the online videos  that JToolman posted (thanks!) and those that are on the  Precision Color website, it does not seem all that difficult.

I have scanned through the forum and see lots of posts touting how much cheaper it is to refill and also saw a lot on comparing different refilling systems.  However, I am curious though as to how good Precision Color's ink is relative to OEM Canon.  Are the inks close enough in color that one would never notice?  How archival is the Precision Color ink-- i.e., does it fade more or less than OEM Canon ink?   For example, if I have a print that I want to give as a gift, am I going to be embarrassed a year later because the image now looks degraded?

Obviously Precision Color is much cheaper than OEM Canon, but outside of the hassle of filling your own carts, what does one lose by refilling versus just buying brand new OEM carts?  Are there any negatives to using the Precision Color inks from a quality perspective?

Any input would be most appreciated!

Thanks!

Bruce

mike earussi Veteran Member • Posts: 9,153
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100
3

According to Jose, PCs inks are a really close color match to OEM inks. However no 3rd party ink has ever come close in longevity to OEM inks.  You get what you pay for in that regard.

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Dannno
Dannno Senior Member • Posts: 1,601
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

I am running PC inks in my Pro-100. The switch was pretty seamless. I din't purge my carts, just modified them and added PC ink. I have not run scientific test of any sort, but my gut tells me that I can't tell the difference. Regarding longevity- I have no answer for you.

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jtoolman
jtoolman Veteran Member • Posts: 6,812
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100
4

BruceLV wrote:

I am new to home printing and have been researching whether to stay with Canon OEM inks or refill my own cartridges using the Precision Color system. From the online videos that JToolman posted (thanks!) and those that are on the Precision Color website, it does not seem all that difficult.

Though it is not, if done incorrectly you can end up with insufficient ink flow and that is death to canon print heads.

I have scanned through the forum and see lots of posts touting how much cheaper it is to refill and also saw a lot on comparing different refilling systems. However, I am curious though as to how good Precision Color's ink is relative to OEM Canon. Are the inks close enough in color that one would never notice?

Depends on your definition of Close.

No Third party ink set is a perfect match to OEM. Ever!

How archival is the Precision Color ink-- i.e., does it fade more or less than OEM Canon ink? For example, if I have a print that I want to give as a gift, am I going to be embarrassed a year later because the image now looks degraded?

Of course It will fade sooner than OEM. I mean you are paying about 70 cents per refill compared $15. So what would you expect.

But... I have submitted these inks to Aardenburg Image Group for official accelerated fade tests. They are not done yet so we will have to wait and see. My own not so scientific methods show that after about 5 months non stop exposure on a west facing window the slight bit of fading is very even so I have not detected any shifts in color balance.

But the recommended practice is if you sell a print or give it as a present that's supposed to last, you better use OEM and frame under glass.

Obviously Precision Color is much cheaper than OEM Canon, but outside of the hassle of filling your own carts, what does one lose by refilling versus just buying brand new OEM carts? Are there any negatives to using the Precision Color inks from a quality perspective?

What do you loose? The guaranteed quality, consistency and longevity of OEM vs "Close Enough" and shorter longevity.  Custom profiling will get you closer to matching OEM, but there is only so much custom profiling can do.

Please go to mky video channel -link below for all he Pro100 info as well as PC ink info and much more.

But i will leave you with this. As I said OEM $14-15 a cart.  Refilling about 60-70 cents a cart.

Any input would be most appreciated!

Thanks!

Bruce

Joe

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farmersteve
farmersteve Senior Member • Posts: 1,036
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100
1

OEM inks are the best, but also 10 times the cost of refilling your own cartridges, so you have to live with the slight degradation in print quality. Actually to my eye I have not seen any difference in the actual color rendition between OEM and PC inks.

Having said that, look back in the archives on my unscientific fade test of a couple of black and white prints. PC black and white prints on a crappy Costco paper started fading in a couple of weeks. I still have those prints and they are fading to orange right now where an Epson pigment print printed at the same time is essentially unchanged.

I am doing another unofficial fade test. Four prints of the same image, Epson vs. Canon inks printed on Ilford paper one each has been sprayed with print spray to see if it mitigates the fading process.

It's only been a month so far and I'm not seeing a whole lot of change yet. Will report in a month or so for the first report.

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Howard Moftich Veteran Member • Posts: 9,986
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

What kind of light exposure are you giving the PC prints?

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farmersteve
farmersteve Senior Member • Posts: 1,036
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

Howard Moftich wrote:

What kind of light exposure are you giving the PC prints?

same as jtoolman, taped to a a west facing window

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OP BruceLV Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

farmersteve wrote:

I am doing another unofficial fade test. Four prints of the same image, Epson vs. Canon inks printed on Ilford paper one each has been sprayed with print spray to see if it mitigates the fading process.

What do you spray them with?  I have never sprayed my prints before (again, newer to home printing), but have seen several people on this forum mention that they do so.  Is the spray an aerosol spray?  Is it easy to evenly apply?  Do you need to spray if you put the print under glass?

Thanks in advance for your assistance!

Bruce

mike earussi Veteran Member • Posts: 9,153
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

BruceLV wrote:

farmersteve wrote:

I am doing another unofficial fade test. Four prints of the same image, Epson vs. Canon inks printed on Ilford paper one each has been sprayed with print spray to see if it mitigates the fading process.

What do you spray them with? I have never sprayed my prints before (again, newer to home printing), but have seen several people on this forum mention that they do so. Is the spray an aerosol spray? Is it easy to evenly apply? Do you need to spray if you put the print under glass?

Thanks in advance for your assistance!

Bruce

There are several different types of sprays, all aerosol. Hahnemuhle and Moab make a very light type that adds  some UV protection along with some resistance to fingerprints, but otherwise don't change the look of the print. Then there are much heavier sprays that are used to add a surface, such as glossy, satin and matte.

They all have an odor, with the heavier sprays having a stronger odor than the light sprays and taking from a few hours to several days for the odor to dissipate, but they all need ventilation of some sort.  Also overspray is common so don't spray around anything you don't want hit by it.

And spraying is unnecessary if you plan of putting your print behind glass.

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OP BruceLV Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

jtoolman wrote:

BruceLV wrote:

I am new to home printing and have been researching whether to stay with Canon OEM inks or refill my own cartridges using the Precision Color system. From the online videos that JToolman posted (thanks!) and those that are on the Precision Color website, it does not seem all that difficult.

Though it is not, if done incorrectly you can end up with insufficient ink flow and that is death to canon print heads.

I have scanned through the forum and see lots of posts touting how much cheaper it is to refill and also saw a lot on comparing different refilling systems. However, I am curious though as to how good Precision Color's ink is relative to OEM Canon. Are the inks close enough in color that one would never notice?

Depends on your definition of Close.

No Third party ink set is a perfect match to OEM. Ever!

How archival is the Precision Color ink-- i.e., does it fade more or less than OEM Canon ink? For example, if I have a print that I want to give as a gift, am I going to be embarrassed a year later because the image now looks degraded?

Of course It will fade sooner than OEM. I mean you are paying about 70 cents per refill compared $15. So what would you expect.

But... I have submitted these inks to Aardenburg Image Group for official accelerated fade tests. They are not done yet so we will have to wait and see. My own not so scientific methods show that after about 5 months non stop exposure on a west facing window the slight bit of fading is very even so I have not detected any shifts in color balance.

But the recommended practice is if you sell a print or give it as a present that's supposed to last, you better use OEM and frame under glass.

Obviously Precision Color is much cheaper than OEM Canon, but outside of the hassle of filling your own carts, what does one lose by refilling versus just buying brand new OEM carts? Are there any negatives to using the Precision Color inks from a quality perspective?

What do you loose? The guaranteed quality, consistency and longevity of OEM vs "Close Enough" and shorter longevity. Custom profiling will get you closer to matching OEM, but there is only so much custom profiling can do.

Please go to mky video channel -link below for all he Pro100 info as well as PC ink info and much more.

But i will leave you with this. As I said OEM $14-15 a cart. Refilling about 60-70 cents a cart.

Any input would be most appreciated!

Thanks!

Bruce

Joe

Joe,

Thanks for you responses! Very helpful, but that kind of spawned a new set of questions!! I apologize, but I really like to get an in-depth understanding of things before I take a plunge (printer cleaning pun intended!!). Regarding the Precision Color refill system.

1) I realize the Canon ink OEM Yellow CL-42 cartridge should not be refilled (at least w/o aggressively flushing) because the OEM and PC inks do not play well sometimes. That aside, can the other 7 colors of inks tolerate some level of mixing? For example, as I'm switching over to the PC system, if I have an original Canon ink OEM cart that is, say 1/2 full, can I top it off with PC ink of the same color? Or, do I need to go through the flushing process, dry out the cart and then refill it with PC ink?

2) If take an original empty or near empty Canon ink OEM cart out of my printer and want to save it for later conversion to the PC refill system, can I just cap it off and wait until I have a full set of near empty carts before doing anything? Or, should should I flush it when I take it out? It might sit for a couple months before I have a complete set of original OEM near empty carts to convert.

3) Related to #2, how long can a flushed cart sit empty? Does it damage the cart sponge material to sit for a prolonged period of time without ink? Also, can a near empty cart sit for a couple months capped and unused?

4) I assume that as I convert to the PC system, that I should never have a mix of original Canon ink carts and PC ink carts in the printer at the same time. Is that correct? I would think the ICC profile (regardless of whether I used the PC or Canon profile) would not be completely accurate in this situation?

5) Is there any issue if I am using the PC refill system and later decide I want to buy a set of original Canon ink OEM carts and stop using the PC refill system (or use it for a short period of time before going back to the PC system)?

6) Now for the big question (as if I haven't asked enough already!). What is the best strategy to migrate to the refill system. I was thinking about buying the PC Kit that includes 8 empty\flushed OEM cartridges from PC and moving the chips over from my original OEM Canon ink carts. Of course doing that renders the my original carts useless as they now are chipless. My original intent was to have 2 complete sets, but as I think about it, I would first have to have 2 sets of original Canon OEM carts with chips-- this, would mean purchasing a complete 2nd set from Canon or trying to find an empty set on eBay (leery of what quality I would actually get-- what has your experience buying empty carts on eBay been like?).

I guess alternatively, I could just wait for my first original ink Canon OEM cart to go low and then purge the ink out of all 8 (well except the Yellow- I would get a new one from PC), flush and refill with PC ink. That would waste my Canon ink, but I'm not sure what is the best way to migrate is.

I guess another thought would be to simply purchase the PC kit with carts from PC , fill them all and just put them in my PRO-100 and have just a single set.  I don't do commercial work so it probably would not be that much of a pain to just have one set.  When one cart would go low, I could just take them all out and top them all off (which would help reduce the ink wasting from a more serial replacement process).

I'd be curious on your thoughts for the most effective migration strategy since you are the expert and have done this many times!!  Do you have any suggestions?

Hopefully, these are the last of my questions but I REALLY REALLY appreciate your direct help and the tremendous assistance from all of your videos.  Have a great weekend!

Bruce

OP BruceLV Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

mike earussi wrote:

BruceLV wrote:

farmersteve wrote:

I am doing another unofficial fade test. Four prints of the same image, Epson vs. Canon inks printed on Ilford paper one each has been sprayed with print spray to see if it mitigates the fading process.

What do you spray them with? I have never sprayed my prints before (again, newer to home printing), but have seen several people on this forum mention that they do so. Is the spray an aerosol spray? Is it easy to evenly apply? Do you need to spray if you put the print under glass?

Thanks in advance for your assistance!

Bruce

There are several different types of sprays, all aerosol. Hahnemuhle and Moab make a very light type that adds some UV protection along with some resistance to fingerprints, but otherwise don't change the look of the print. Then there are much heavier sprays that are used to add a surface, such as glossy, satin and matte.

They all have an odor, with the heavier sprays having a stronger odor than the light sprays and taking from a few hours to several days for the odor to dissipate, but they all need ventilation of some sort. Also overspray is common so don't spray around anything you don't want hit by it.

And spraying is unnecessary if you plan of putting your print behind glass.

Thanks for the great info.  Can you use on manufacturers spray on another's paper?  For example, can I spray the Moab spray on Canon papers?

mike earussi Veteran Member • Posts: 9,153
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

BruceLV wrote:

mike earussi wrote:

BruceLV wrote:

farmersteve wrote:

I am doing another unofficial fade test. Four prints of the same image, Epson vs. Canon inks printed on Ilford paper one each has been sprayed with print spray to see if it mitigates the fading process.

What do you spray them with? I have never sprayed my prints before (again, newer to home printing), but have seen several people on this forum mention that they do so. Is the spray an aerosol spray? Is it easy to evenly apply? Do you need to spray if you put the print under glass?

Thanks in advance for your assistance!

Bruce

There are several different types of sprays, all aerosol. Hahnemuhle and Moab make a very light type that adds some UV protection along with some resistance to fingerprints, but otherwise don't change the look of the print. Then there are much heavier sprays that are used to add a surface, such as glossy, satin and matte.

They all have an odor, with the heavier sprays having a stronger odor than the light sprays and taking from a few hours to several days for the odor to dissipate, but they all need ventilation of some sort. Also overspray is common so don't spray around anything you don't want hit by it.

And spraying is unnecessary if you plan of putting your print behind glass.

Thanks for the great info. Can you use on manufacturers spray on another's paper? For example, can I spray the Moab spray on Canon papers?

Yes, the sprays contain basically the same mix of chemicals just with varying concentrations depending on manufacture.

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Mark McCormick Senior Member • Posts: 1,526
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100
5

Spray coatings like Premier Print Shield, Moab Desert Varnish, Hahnemuhle Protective Spray, are basically the same product (rebadged by different vendors). They can indeed provide physical and chemical protection. Another one I've tried is Lascaux Fixative. The acrylic polymer used in Lascaux Fixative has a long and excellent track record in art conservation. That's the good news.

The bad news is that all of of the sprays I've tried cause adverse initial color and tonal changes, especially in the darker colors, when applied to dye-based inkjet prints. I recommend them now only for pigmented ink sets where they either cause no changes to the image or slightly enhance it (deepest black pick up a little more richness and better Dmax). Not so with dye-based prints. The dark colors will lighten and some colors get muddier looking. These changes are subtle enough that some folks may not notice the issue, but discriminating printmakers will catch the changes immediately. The screenshot shown below shows the results for Premier Print Shield applied to Epson Claria dyes on Epson Premium glossy paper. Note in particular the dark skin tone colors and black patches in the lower right corner of the color target. Note also the effect on the red patch color.

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jtoolman
jtoolman Veteran Member • Posts: 6,812
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

BruceLV wrote:

jtoolman wrote:

BruceLV wrote:

I am new to home printing and have been researching whether to stay with Canon OEM inks or refill my own cartridges using the Precision Color system. From the online videos that JToolman posted (thanks!) and those that are on the Precision Color website, it does not seem all that difficult.

Though it is not, if done incorrectly you can end up with insufficient ink flow and that is death to canon print heads.

I have scanned through the forum and see lots of posts touting how much cheaper it is to refill and also saw a lot on comparing different refilling systems. However, I am curious though as to how good Precision Color's ink is relative to OEM Canon. Are the inks close enough in color that one would never notice?

Depends on your definition of Close.

No Third party ink set is a perfect match to OEM. Ever!

How archival is the Precision Color ink-- i.e., does it fade more or less than OEM Canon ink? For example, if I have a print that I want to give as a gift, am I going to be embarrassed a year later because the image now looks degraded?

Of course It will fade sooner than OEM. I mean you are paying about 70 cents per refill compared $15. So what would you expect.

But... I have submitted these inks to Aardenburg Image Group for official accelerated fade tests. They are not done yet so we will have to wait and see. My own not so scientific methods show that after about 5 months non stop exposure on a west facing window the slight bit of fading is very even so I have not detected any shifts in color balance.

But the recommended practice is if you sell a print or give it as a present that's supposed to last, you better use OEM and frame under glass.

Obviously Precision Color is much cheaper than OEM Canon, but outside of the hassle of filling your own carts, what does one lose by refilling versus just buying brand new OEM carts? Are there any negatives to using the Precision Color inks from a quality perspective?

What do you loose? The guaranteed quality, consistency and longevity of OEM vs "Close Enough" and shorter longevity. Custom profiling will get you closer to matching OEM, but there is only so much custom profiling can do.

Please go to mky video channel -link below for all he Pro100 info as well as PC ink info and much more.

But i will leave you with this. As I said OEM $14-15 a cart. Refilling about 60-70 cents a cart.

Any input would be most appreciated!

Thanks!

Bruce

Joe

Joe,

Thanks for you responses! Very helpful, but that kind of spawned a new set of questions!! I apologize, but I really like to get an in-depth understanding of things before I take a plunge (printer cleaning pun intended!!). Regarding the Precision Color refill system.

1) I realize the Canon ink OEM Yellow CL-42 cartridge should not be refilled (at least w/o aggressively flushing) because the OEM and PC inks do not play well sometimes. That aside, can the other 7 colors of inks tolerate some level of mixing? For example, as I'm switching over to the PC system, if I have an original Canon ink OEM cart that is, say 1/2 full, can I top it off with PC ink of the same color? Or, do I need to go through the flushing process, dry out the cart and then refill it with PC ink?

You can top off the originals after modifying them with PC inks regardless of level.

LOW point is the best time. Of course not the YELLOW.

2) If take an original empty or near empty Canon ink OEM cart out of my printer and want to save it for later conversion to the PC refill system, can I just cap it off and wait until I have a full set of near empty carts before doing anything? Or, should should I flush it when I take it out? It might sit for a couple months before I have a complete set of original OEM near empty carts to convert.

They will be fine. No need to flush any of them out.

3) Related to #2, how long can a flushed cart sit empty? Does it damage the cart sponge material to sit for a prolonged period of time without ink? Also, can a near empty cart sit for a couple months capped and unused?

Pretty much indefinitely. The sponge is composed of a patented synthetic fiber.  It will not deteriorate.

4) I assume that as I convert to the PC system, that I should never have a mix of original Canon ink carts and PC ink carts in the printer at the same time. Is that correct? I would think the ICC profile (regardless of whether I used the PC or Canon profile) would not be completely accurate in this situation?

If you do one cart at a time you can't avoid having some carts with PC and some carts with OEM. There is not point worrying about ICC profiles until you are running on nearly Pure PC inks which occurs after the 2-3 refill. Then you can use theirs or make you own if you are equipped to do so.

5) Is there any issue if I am using the PC refill system and later decide I want to buy a set of original Canon ink OEM carts and stop using the PC refill system (or use it for a short period of time before going back to the PC system)?

None at all. Just run one ceaning cycle after the initial ink purge.

6) Now for the big question (as if I haven't asked enough already!). What is the best strategy to migrate to the refill system. I was thinking about buying the PC Kit that includes 8 empty\flushed OEM cartridges from PC and moving the chips over from my original OEM Canon ink carts. Of course doing that renders the my original carts useless as they now are chipless. My original intent was to have 2 complete sets, but as I think about it, I would first have to have 2 sets of original Canon OEM carts with chips-- this, would mean purchasing a complete 2nd set from Canon or trying to find an empty set on eBay (leery of what quality I would actually get-- what has your experience buying empty carts on eBay been like?).

I think you've answered your own question. Makes no sense. UNLESS..... you truly do not want to deal with the modification process. You will still need two sets of OEM carts and two sets of CLI-8 modified and flushed carts. Transfer the chips, reset and fill.

I guess alternatively, I could just wait for my first original ink Canon OEM cart to go low and then purge the ink out of all 8 (well except the Yellow- I would get a new one from PC), flush and refill with PC ink. That would waste my Canon ink, but I'm not sure what is the best way to migrate is.

Sure, wasteful but quick

I guess another thought would be to simply purchase the PC kit with carts from PC , fill them all and just put them in my PRO-100 and have just a single set. I don't do commercial work so it probably would not be that much of a pain to just have one set. When one cart would go low, I could just take them all out and top them all off (which would help reduce the ink wasting from a more serial replacement process).

I worked with just one set for years. Inconvenient! If you can reset and top off 8 carts in a matter of minutes, then sure, you can go that route.

I'd be curious on your thoughts for the most effective migration strategy since you are the expert and have done this many times!! Do you have any suggestions?

Hopefully, these are the last of my questions but I REALLY REALLY appreciate your direct help and the tremendous assistance from all of your videos. Have a great weekend!

Bruce

I am a proponent of reducing Ink Purges as much as possible, The only way to do that is avoiding the DOMINO EFFECT!

ALWAYS provide the printer a complete set of FULL carts. It will take you a long time to get one cart to reach low. If you do one cart at a time you will changing carts every few days as they are used up at drastically different rates.

One purge vs eight purges in the same period of time!

Now which would prefer?

Joe

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mike earussi Veteran Member • Posts: 9,153
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

Interesting. I wasn't aware there was any difference between how pigment vs dye reacted to the "protective" sprays. According to Hahnemuhle there should be no change.

Thanks for the comparison.

Mark McCormick wrote:

Spray coatings like Premier Print Shield, Moab Desert Varnish, Hahnemuhle Protective Spray, are basically the same product (rebadged by different vendors). They can indeed provide physical and chemical protection. Another one I've tried is Lascaux Fixative. The acrylic polymer used in Lascaux Fixative has a long and excellent track record in art conservation. That's the good news.

The bad news is that all of of the sprays I've tried cause adverse initial color and tonal changes, especially in the darker colors, when applied to dye-based inkjet prints. I recommend them now only for pigmented ink sets where they either cause no changes to the image or slightly enhance it (deepest black pick up a little more richness and better Dmax). Not so with dye-based prints. The dark colors will lighten and some colors get muddier looking. These changes are subtle enough that some folks may not notice the issue, but discriminating printmakers will catch the changes immediately. The screenshot shown below shows the results for Premier Print Shield applied to Epson Claria dyes on Epson Premium glossy paper. Note in particular the dark skin tone colors and black patches in the lower right corner of the color target. Note also the effect on the red patch color.

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farmersteve
farmersteve Senior Member • Posts: 1,036
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

Mark is being very precise, as that is his job! To my eye the changes are so subtle with dye prints, especially BW prints, that if it makes them last longer, I'm all for it. I only do this on glossy, luster and semi-gloss papers. I hate the look of dye on matte paper. When I really want something to be more permanent, I move over to my Epson pigment printer. As is known, I get a slight loss in vibrancy, but the longevity is worth the trade off.

Looking forward to Mark's work on the Pro-100/Precision Color ink tests...

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OP BruceLV Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

jtoolman wrote:

BruceLV wrote:

jtoolman wrote:

BruceLV wrote:

I am new to home printing and have been researching whether to stay with Canon OEM inks or refill my own cartridges using the Precision Color system. From the online videos that JToolman posted (thanks!) and those that are on the Precision Color website, it does not seem all that difficult.

Though it is not, if done incorrectly you can end up with insufficient ink flow and that is death to canon print heads.

I have scanned through the forum and see lots of posts touting how much cheaper it is to refill and also saw a lot on comparing different refilling systems. However, I am curious though as to how good Precision Color's ink is relative to OEM Canon. Are the inks close enough in color that one would never notice?

Depends on your definition of Close.

No Third party ink set is a perfect match to OEM. Ever!

How archival is the Precision Color ink-- i.e., does it fade more or less than OEM Canon ink? For example, if I have a print that I want to give as a gift, am I going to be embarrassed a year later because the image now looks degraded?

Of course It will fade sooner than OEM. I mean you are paying about 70 cents per refill compared $15. So what would you expect.

But... I have submitted these inks to Aardenburg Image Group for official accelerated fade tests. They are not done yet so we will have to wait and see. My own not so scientific methods show that after about 5 months non stop exposure on a west facing window the slight bit of fading is very even so I have not detected any shifts in color balance.

But the recommended practice is if you sell a print or give it as a present that's supposed to last, you better use OEM and frame under glass.

Obviously Precision Color is much cheaper than OEM Canon, but outside of the hassle of filling your own carts, what does one lose by refilling versus just buying brand new OEM carts? Are there any negatives to using the Precision Color inks from a quality perspective?

What do you loose? The guaranteed quality, consistency and longevity of OEM vs "Close Enough" and shorter longevity. Custom profiling will get you closer to matching OEM, but there is only so much custom profiling can do.

Please go to mky video channel -link below for all he Pro100 info as well as PC ink info and much more.

But i will leave you with this. As I said OEM $14-15 a cart. Refilling about 60-70 cents a cart.

Any input would be most appreciated!

Thanks!

Bruce

Joe

Joe,

Thanks for you responses! Very helpful, but that kind of spawned a new set of questions!! I apologize, but I really like to get an in-depth understanding of things before I take a plunge (printer cleaning pun intended!!). Regarding the Precision Color refill system.

1) I realize the Canon ink OEM Yellow CL-42 cartridge should not be refilled (at least w/o aggressively flushing) because the OEM and PC inks do not play well sometimes. That aside, can the other 7 colors of inks tolerate some level of mixing? For example, as I'm switching over to the PC system, if I have an original Canon ink OEM cart that is, say 1/2 full, can I top it off with PC ink of the same color? Or, do I need to go through the flushing process, dry out the cart and then refill it with PC ink?

You can top off the originals after modifying them with PC inks regardless of level.

LOW point is the best time. Of course not the YELLOW.

2) If take an original empty or near empty Canon ink OEM cart out of my printer and want to save it for later conversion to the PC refill system, can I just cap it off and wait until I have a full set of near empty carts before doing anything? Or, should should I flush it when I take it out? It might sit for a couple months before I have a complete set of original OEM near empty carts to convert.

They will be fine. No need to flush any of them out.

3) Related to #2, how long can a flushed cart sit empty? Does it damage the cart sponge material to sit for a prolonged period of time without ink? Also, can a near empty cart sit for a couple months capped and unused?

Pretty much indefinitely. The sponge is composed of a patented synthetic fiber. It will not deteriorate.

4) I assume that as I convert to the PC system, that I should never have a mix of original Canon ink carts and PC ink carts in the printer at the same time. Is that correct? I would think the ICC profile (regardless of whether I used the PC or Canon profile) would not be completely accurate in this situation?

If you do one cart at a time you can't avoid having some carts with PC and some carts with OEM. There is not point worrying about ICC profiles until you are running on nearly Pure PC inks which occurs after the 2-3 refill. Then you can use theirs or make you own if you are equipped to do so.

5) Is there any issue if I am using the PC refill system and later decide I want to buy a set of original Canon ink OEM carts and stop using the PC refill system (or use it for a short period of time before going back to the PC system)?

None at all. Just run one ceaning cycle after the initial ink purge.

6) Now for the big question (as if I haven't asked enough already!). What is the best strategy to migrate to the refill system. I was thinking about buying the PC Kit that includes 8 empty\flushed OEM cartridges from PC and moving the chips over from my original OEM Canon ink carts. Of course doing that renders the my original carts useless as they now are chipless. My original intent was to have 2 complete sets, but as I think about it, I would first have to have 2 sets of original Canon OEM carts with chips-- this, would mean purchasing a complete 2nd set from Canon or trying to find an empty set on eBay (leery of what quality I would actually get-- what has your experience buying empty carts on eBay been like?).

I think you've answered your own question. Makes no sense. UNLESS..... you truly do not want to deal with the modification process. You will still need two sets of OEM carts and two sets of CLI-8 modified and flushed carts. Transfer the chips, reset and fill.

I guess alternatively, I could just wait for my first original ink Canon OEM cart to go low and then purge the ink out of all 8 (well except the Yellow- I would get a new one from PC), flush and refill with PC ink. That would waste my Canon ink, but I'm not sure what is the best way to migrate is.

Sure, wasteful but quick

I guess another thought would be to simply purchase the PC kit with carts from PC , fill them all and just put them in my PRO-100 and have just a single set. I don't do commercial work so it probably would not be that much of a pain to just have one set. When one cart would go low, I could just take them all out and top them all off (which would help reduce the ink wasting from a more serial replacement process).

I worked with just one set for years. Inconvenient! If you can reset and top off 8 carts in a matter of minutes, then sure, you can go that route.

I'd be curious on your thoughts for the most effective migration strategy since you are the expert and have done this many times!! Do you have any suggestions?

Hopefully, these are the last of my questions but I REALLY REALLY appreciate your direct help and the tremendous assistance from all of your videos. Have a great weekend!

Bruce

I am a proponent of reducing Ink Purges as much as possible, The only way to do that is avoiding the DOMINO EFFECT!

ALWAYS provide the printer a complete set of FULL carts. It will take you a long time to get one cart to reach low. If you do one cart at a time you will changing carts every few days as they are used up at drastically different rates.

One purge vs eight purges in the same period of time!

Now which would prefer?

Joe

-

MY VIDEO CHANNEL. PRINTING and personal videos.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCz9YXaSulpM90vC24lmAeZA
Micromachining and Miniature Cabinetmaking channel
JTOOLMAN1949 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFPD5beoll9TvvW2u_dR0hQ

Thanks Jose!  I have watched about 5 or 6 of your videos associated with refilling. From what I learned from them, the videos on PC's site and the forum,  I had those questions above.  Thanks for answering them all.  I think I have a comprehensive understanding and am ready to go.  Have a great day!

jtoolman
jtoolman Veteran Member • Posts: 6,812
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

BruceLV wrote:

jtoolman wrote:

BruceLV wrote:

jtoolman wrote:

BruceLV wrote:

I am new to home printing and have been researching whether to stay with Canon OEM inks or refill my own cartridges using the Precision Color system. From the online videos that JToolman posted (thanks!) and those that are on the Precision Color website, it does not seem all that difficult.

Though it is not, if done incorrectly you can end up with insufficient ink flow and that is death to canon print heads.

I have scanned through the forum and see lots of posts touting how much cheaper it is to refill and also saw a lot on comparing different refilling systems. However, I am curious though as to how good Precision Color's ink is relative to OEM Canon. Are the inks close enough in color that one would never notice?

Depends on your definition of Close.

No Third party ink set is a perfect match to OEM. Ever!

How archival is the Precision Color ink-- i.e., does it fade more or less than OEM Canon ink? For example, if I have a print that I want to give as a gift, am I going to be embarrassed a year later because the image now looks degraded?

Of course It will fade sooner than OEM. I mean you are paying about 70 cents per refill compared $15. So what would you expect.

But... I have submitted these inks to Aardenburg Image Group for official accelerated fade tests. They are not done yet so we will have to wait and see. My own not so scientific methods show that after about 5 months non stop exposure on a west facing window the slight bit of fading is very even so I have not detected any shifts in color balance.

But the recommended practice is if you sell a print or give it as a present that's supposed to last, you better use OEM and frame under glass.

Obviously Precision Color is much cheaper than OEM Canon, but outside of the hassle of filling your own carts, what does one lose by refilling versus just buying brand new OEM carts? Are there any negatives to using the Precision Color inks from a quality perspective?

What do you loose? The guaranteed quality, consistency and longevity of OEM vs "Close Enough" and shorter longevity. Custom profiling will get you closer to matching OEM, but there is only so much custom profiling can do.

Please go to mky video channel -link below for all he Pro100 info as well as PC ink info and much more.

But i will leave you with this. As I said OEM $14-15 a cart. Refilling about 60-70 cents a cart.

Any input would be most appreciated!

Thanks!

Bruce

Joe

Joe,

Thanks for you responses! Very helpful, but that kind of spawned a new set of questions!! I apologize, but I really like to get an in-depth understanding of things before I take a plunge (printer cleaning pun intended!!). Regarding the Precision Color refill system.

1) I realize the Canon ink OEM Yellow CL-42 cartridge should not be refilled (at least w/o aggressively flushing) because the OEM and PC inks do not play well sometimes. That aside, can the other 7 colors of inks tolerate some level of mixing? For example, as I'm switching over to the PC system, if I have an original Canon ink OEM cart that is, say 1/2 full, can I top it off with PC ink of the same color? Or, do I need to go through the flushing process, dry out the cart and then refill it with PC ink?

You can top off the originals after modifying them with PC inks regardless of level.

LOW point is the best time. Of course not the YELLOW.

2) If take an original empty or near empty Canon ink OEM cart out of my printer and want to save it for later conversion to the PC refill system, can I just cap it off and wait until I have a full set of near empty carts before doing anything? Or, should should I flush it when I take it out? It might sit for a couple months before I have a complete set of original OEM near empty carts to convert.

They will be fine. No need to flush any of them out.

3) Related to #2, how long can a flushed cart sit empty? Does it damage the cart sponge material to sit for a prolonged period of time without ink? Also, can a near empty cart sit for a couple months capped and unused?

Pretty much indefinitely. The sponge is composed of a patented synthetic fiber. It will not deteriorate.

4) I assume that as I convert to the PC system, that I should never have a mix of original Canon ink carts and PC ink carts in the printer at the same time. Is that correct? I would think the ICC profile (regardless of whether I used the PC or Canon profile) would not be completely accurate in this situation?

If you do one cart at a time you can't avoid having some carts with PC and some carts with OEM. There is not point worrying about ICC profiles until you are running on nearly Pure PC inks which occurs after the 2-3 refill. Then you can use theirs or make you own if you are equipped to do so.

5) Is there any issue if I am using the PC refill system and later decide I want to buy a set of original Canon ink OEM carts and stop using the PC refill system (or use it for a short period of time before going back to the PC system)?

None at all. Just run one ceaning cycle after the initial ink purge.

6) Now for the big question (as if I haven't asked enough already!). What is the best strategy to migrate to the refill system. I was thinking about buying the PC Kit that includes 8 empty\flushed OEM cartridges from PC and moving the chips over from my original OEM Canon ink carts. Of course doing that renders the my original carts useless as they now are chipless. My original intent was to have 2 complete sets, but as I think about it, I would first have to have 2 sets of original Canon OEM carts with chips-- this, would mean purchasing a complete 2nd set from Canon or trying to find an empty set on eBay (leery of what quality I would actually get-- what has your experience buying empty carts on eBay been like?).

I think you've answered your own question. Makes no sense. UNLESS..... you truly do not want to deal with the modification process. You will still need two sets of OEM carts and two sets of CLI-8 modified and flushed carts. Transfer the chips, reset and fill.

I guess alternatively, I could just wait for my first original ink Canon OEM cart to go low and then purge the ink out of all 8 (well except the Yellow- I would get a new one from PC), flush and refill with PC ink. That would waste my Canon ink, but I'm not sure what is the best way to migrate is.

Sure, wasteful but quick

I guess another thought would be to simply purchase the PC kit with carts from PC , fill them all and just put them in my PRO-100 and have just a single set. I don't do commercial work so it probably would not be that much of a pain to just have one set. When one cart would go low, I could just take them all out and top them all off (which would help reduce the ink wasting from a more serial replacement process).

I worked with just one set for years. Inconvenient! If you can reset and top off 8 carts in a matter of minutes, then sure, you can go that route.

I'd be curious on your thoughts for the most effective migration strategy since you are the expert and have done this many times!! Do you have any suggestions?

Hopefully, these are the last of my questions but I REALLY REALLY appreciate your direct help and the tremendous assistance from all of your videos. Have a great weekend!

Bruce

I am a proponent of reducing Ink Purges as much as possible, The only way to do that is avoiding the DOMINO EFFECT!

ALWAYS provide the printer a complete set of FULL carts. It will take you a long time to get one cart to reach low. If you do one cart at a time you will changing carts every few days as they are used up at drastically different rates.

One purge vs eight purges in the same period of time!

Now which would prefer?

Joe

-

MY VIDEO CHANNEL. PRINTING and personal videos.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCz9YXaSulpM90vC24lmAeZA
Micromachining and Miniature Cabinetmaking channel
JTOOLMAN1949 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFPD5beoll9TvvW2u_dR0hQ

Thanks Jose! I have watched about 5 or 6 of your videos associated with refilling. From what I learned from them, the videos on PC's site and the forum, I had those questions above. Thanks for answering them all. I think I have a comprehensive understanding and am ready to go. Have a great day!

Now you just need to watch mine.

Joe

-- hide signature --

MY VIDEO CHANNEL. PRINTING and personal videos.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCz9YXaSulpM90vC24lmAeZA
Micromachining and Miniature Cabinetmaking channel
JTOOLMAN1949 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFPD5beoll9TvvW2u_dR0hQ

Anthony Perera Forum Member • Posts: 65
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

How do the PC colours look now?

 Anthony Perera's gear list:Anthony Perera's gear list
Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 100mm f/2.0 USM Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Canon EF 35mm F2 IS USM Canon Pixma Pro-100
farmersteve
farmersteve Senior Member • Posts: 1,036
Re: Quality of Precision Color Ink versus OEM Canon ink for Pixma Pro 100

The PC prints are gone. OEM inks are unchanged. Epson pigment prints are unchanged. Precision colors has a new formulation that I have not had time to test. I have moved on to a Canon Pro-10 printer which is pigment. I will be doing some PC inks in that printer soon.

-- hide signature --

Film is making a comeback!

 farmersteve's gear list:farmersteve's gear list
Sony a6000 Canon EOS RP Canon Pixma Pro-100 Canon Pixma Pro-10 +2 more
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