HDR

Started Jun 6, 2016 | Questions
Blanky
Blanky New Member • Posts: 6
HDR

there si no HDR on this camera ? i want to buy it , now i have a canon sx700hs and i want to buy this LX100 but i'm scared becouse anywhere i've seen writte HDR , with my canon wen there is  lots of light there is everything white and i don't like'it and i want a camera with HDR better than my canon  .... thanks

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Panasonic LX100 PowerShot SX700
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kkardster
kkardster Forum Pro • Posts: 10,214
Re: HDR
1

I can't state that the LX100 will be better than your Canon - I don't own either - but this comes from the LX100 manual:

Combining still pictures with different exposures ([HDR])

The camera can combine 3 still pictures taken at different exposures into a single

properly exposed picture with rich gradation. The individual pictures used to create the

HDR picture are not saved. You can minimize the loss of gradations in bright areas and

dark areas when, for example, the contrast between the background and the subject is

large.

A combined HDR picture is saved in JPEG format.

MENU→ [Rec] → [HDR]

[ON] Creates a combined HDR picture.

[OFF] Does not create a combined HDR picture.

  • [Dynamic Range] [AUTO]: Takes pictures after automatically setting the adjustment range of the exposure based on the contrast of a subject.
  • [Dynamic Range] [±1EV] / [±2EV] / [±3EV]: Takes pictures using the adjustment range of the exposure being set.
  • [Auto Align] [ON]: Automatically adjusts the displacement of pictures caused by jitter, etc. We recommend using this setting to take pictures with a handheld camera.
  • [Auto Align] [OFF]: Does not adjust the displacement of pictures. We recommendusing this setting when you use a tripod.

What is HDR?

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range and refers to a technique for expressing a wide

contrast range.

●After the shutter button has been pressed, do not move the camera during the burst operation.

●Since a burst of still pictures are combined after they have been recorded, it will be a few moments before you will be able to record another picture.

●A subject that was in motion when it was recorded may be recorded as an afterimage.

●When [Auto Align] is set to [ON], the angle of view narrows slightly.

●When you take pictures using a flash, the flash mode is fixed to [ ] (Forced Flash Off).

Not available in the following cases:

●This function will not work for still pictures while motion pictures are being recorded.

●[HDR] cannot be used in the following cases:

•When the [Quality] setting is set to [ ], [ ] or [ ]

•When using [Time Lapse Shot]

•When using [Stop Motion Animation] (only available with [Auto Shooting] setting)

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You learn something new every time you press the shutter

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Blanky
OP Blanky New Member • Posts: 6
Re: HDR

kkardster wrote:

I can't state that the LX100 will be better than your Canon - I don't own either - but this comes from the LX100 manual:

Combining still pictures with different exposures ([HDR])

The camera can combine 3 still pictures taken at different exposures into a single

properly exposed picture with rich gradation. The individual pictures used to create the

HDR picture are not saved. You can minimize the loss of gradations in bright areas and

dark areas when, for example, the contrast between the background and the subject is

large.

A combined HDR picture is saved in JPEG format.

MENU→ [Rec] → [HDR]

[ON] Creates a combined HDR picture.

[OFF] Does not create a combined HDR picture.

  • [Dynamic Range] [AUTO]: Takes pictures after automatically setting the adjustment range of the exposure based on the contrast of a subject.
  • [Dynamic Range] [±1EV] / [±2EV] / [±3EV]: Takes pictures using the adjustment range of the exposure being set.
  • [Auto Align] [ON]: Automatically adjusts the displacement of pictures caused by jitter, etc. We recommend using this setting to take pictures with a handheld camera.
  • [Auto Align] [OFF]: Does not adjust the displacement of pictures. We recommendusing this setting when you use a tripod.

What is HDR?

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range and refers to a technique for expressing a wide

contrast range.

●After the shutter button has been pressed, do not move the camera during the burst operation.

●Since a burst of still pictures are combined after they have been recorded, it will be a few moments before you will be able to record another picture.

●A subject that was in motion when it was recorded may be recorded as an afterimage.

●When [Auto Align] is set to [ON], the angle of view narrows slightly.

●When you take pictures using a flash, the flash mode is fixed to [ ] (Forced Flash Off).

Not available in the following cases:

●This function will not work for still pictures while motion pictures are being recorded.

●[HDR] cannot be used in the following cases:

•When the [Quality] setting is set to [ ], [ ] or [ ]

•When using [Time Lapse Shot]

•When using [Stop Motion Animation] (only available with [Auto Shooting] setting)

Thanks , i think the LX100 is better , this have a 4/3" sensor with F 1.7 there is more light and other things i like on it , i don't know .... i want to buy something compact better than my canon sx700hs , i don't need a zoom camera , i want just something better - more pro

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edhume
edhume Contributing Member • Posts: 816
Re: HDR
1

My LX7 has the option of taking three quick shots +/- whatever EV I set, from 1/3 to 3.0. That works great for HDR. It's just not called that.

I must believe the camera you are interested-in has that feature.

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PhotoTeach2 Forum Pro • Posts: 13,735
Re: HDR
1

edhume wrote:

My LX7 has the option of taking three quick shots +/- whatever EV I set, from 1/3 to 3.0. That works great for HDR. It's just not called that.

I must believe the camera you are interested-in has that feature.

That is referred to as "auto-bracketing" .... three separate shots which can be LATER COMBINED via a special HDR software-program.

In-camera HDR is also three shots, (on Panasonic but only 2 on most Nikons), which are then automatically combined into one (HDR) print.

I don't know about the quality of your Canon but I can tell you that the Nikon P-500's HDR was TERRIBLE ... (unusable).

It is very good in the FZ-1000 but many people still prefer manually combining them for sometimes a greater (sometimes abstract) effect which some people love, (like me), but most hate the over-done effect.

Blanky
OP Blanky New Member • Posts: 6
Re: HDR

thanks , i know , but wen i don't have time to set the camera and i want to make some photos i shoot in automatic , my canon don't have HDR , and wen  want to make a photo and there is the sky or a white thing , this get out all white .... i don't like this , i have frends they make photo with phone camera and the photos are better because have HDR ....

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Blanky
OP Blanky New Member • Posts: 6
Re: HDR

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

edhume wrote:

My LX7 has the option of taking three quick shots +/- whatever EV I set, from 1/3 to 3.0. That works great for HDR. It's just not called that.

I must believe the camera you are interested-in has that feature.

That is referred to as "auto-bracketing" .... three separate shots which can be LATER COMBINED via a special HDR software-program.

In-camera HDR is also three shots, (on Panasonic but only 2 on most Nikons), which are then automatically combined into one (HDR) print.

I don't know about the quality of your Canon but I can tell you that the Nikon P-500's HDR was TERRIBLE ... (unusable).

It is very good in the FZ-1000 but many people still prefer manually combining them for sometimes a greater (sometimes abstract) effect which some people love, (like me), but most hate the over-done effect.

look at this photo , there is too much white , i think with HDR this will be better .... what do you think ? it's normal ? i don't think this , with a phone camera with HDR this photo came out better ....

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alcelc
alcelc Forum Pro • Posts: 17,965
Re: HDR
2

Don't own LX100 but as per general features of Panasonic's M43 cameras (LX100 is a fixed lens model), it has HDR features.

According to the User's Manual, there are 3 features of LX100 relating to HDR.

1) iHDR (P.79 of Manual), when enable, I guess (a new feature not offered by any other Panasonic M43 cameras) would like the iDynamic or iResolution, the camera would apply the effect when the camera thinks applicable. Better confirmation from LX100 users.

2) In-camera HDR (P.113 of Manual) which offering an option of 3 burst shots in 1/2/3ev apart. In this mode "Auto-Align" should better be set to "On". The HDR function can be assigned to any of the 3 fn buttons, or 1 of the 15 soft keys in Q.Menu for quick activation. After the 3 shots, the camera would merger the 3 photos into one with HDR effect.

3) The normal Exposure Bracketing (P.145 of Manual). In which we can select 1/5/7 burst shots and in 1/3 or 2/3 or 1ev apart. After shooting, by HDR software we can merge the shots into one HDR photo. Since it would be created by PP, we can have a lot of say in the effect other than the relatively simple in-camera HDR mode of the camera.

When I first upgrade to GX7, I was very happy with the in-camera HDR function (quick to see result) and had been quite successful until my last trip. In that trip I had a lot of indoor architecture shooting and HDR was excellent for the job. Sadly after returning home, upon closer examination I found most of the HDRs were ruined by the auto alignment problem.

The following is one without HDR shot recently:

The original high contrast scene.

A crop of the water wheel from the above:

The moving water wheel had been frozen by the shutter speed

A HDR by PP from 3 photos of 1ev apart shot under Exposure Bracketing:

HDR by PP in natural mode

A crop of the water wheel from the above HDR image:

Motion distortion can been seen

Comparing to the in-camera HDR, the above were already not bad for a scene involves motion.

The following is a sad experience from my recent travelling. It was a completely still scene (doom ceiling of a historical building in Kashan, Iran). Due to the high contrast (direct sun light, bright white ceiling, and the rich decoration in shadow) it should one one of the best candidate for HDR. Sadly like 70% of my 100+ HDRs from that trip, it had been ruined by the poor image alignment of the in-camera function:

OOC (reizing only) of in-camera HDR

A crop to the focus area:

Reasonably sharp for such 10+ meter high ceiling

A crop to the edge:

Totally blurry edge, double to triple image could be seen...

Therefore, scene has not much moving elements (i.e., wind blowing leaf, moving pet, walking pedestrian, other moving elements etc), and good stabilization (tripod or so) would be key to get good HDR.

Since my last time failure, I also prefer Exposure Bracketing + PP HDR rather than in-camera HDR. Basically any camera offering Exposure compensation could do the job.

Just my 0.02.

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edhume
edhume Contributing Member • Posts: 816
Re: HDR

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

edhume wrote:

My LX7 has the option of taking three quick shots +/- whatever EV I set, from 1/3 to 3.0. That works great for HDR. It's just not called that.

I must believe the camera you are interested-in has that feature.

That is referred to as "auto-bracketing" .... three separate shots which can be LATER COMBINED via a special HDR software-program.

In-camera HDR is also three shots, (on Panasonic but only 2 on most Nikons), which are then automatically combined into one (HDR) print.

I don't know about the quality of your Canon but I can tell you that the Nikon P-500's HDR was TERRIBLE ... (unusable).

It is very good in the FZ-1000 but many people still prefer manually combining them for sometimes a greater (sometimes abstract) effect which some people love, (like me), but most hate the over-done effect.

Thanks for the term. I have tried that with tripod shots and hand-held shots. Works great with tripod shot. A challenge with the hand-held shots, but that depends on the software you are using.

Interesting: a lot of software expect 3 images. They don't expect to HDR a single image.

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alcelc
alcelc Forum Pro • Posts: 17,965
Re: HDR

edhume wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

edhume wrote:

My LX7 has the option of taking three quick shots +/- whatever EV I set, from 1/3 to 3.0. That works great for HDR. It's just not called that.

I must believe the camera you are interested-in has that feature.

That is referred to as "auto-bracketing" .... three separate shots which can be LATER COMBINED via a special HDR software-program.

In-camera HDR is also three shots, (on Panasonic but only 2 on most Nikons), which are then automatically combined into one (HDR) print.

I don't know about the quality of your Canon but I can tell you that the Nikon P-500's HDR was TERRIBLE ... (unusable).

It is very good in the FZ-1000 but many people still prefer manually combining them for sometimes a greater (sometimes abstract) effect which some people love, (like me), but most hate the over-done effect.

Thanks for the term. I have tried that with tripod shots and hand-held shots. Works great with tripod shot. A challenge with the hand-held shots, but that depends on the software you are using.

Interesting: a lot of software expect 3 images. They don't expect to HDR a single image.

On simple understanding, every sensor has its own limited ability to record the light from dark to bright. Under high contrast condition, when the very strong dark & bright exceeds the ability of the sensor, under normal shooting we can only either choose to record more detail in the brighter zone (as a result, less in the dark zone) or vice versa.

HDR is to merger the shadow, mid tone and highlight from each of the 3 images into one. e.g., 3 shots of +1ev, 0ev, and -1ev, HDR will take:

1) the shadow from the image taken from +1ev (shadow area be brightened due to over exposed),

2) the mid tone from the image taken from 0ev (normal exposure for the medium lighted objects); and

3) the highlight from the image taken from -ev (highlight area would be darkened due to under exposed).

As a result, the resulted HDR image would see the shadow not as dark (compare to the image of normal exposure taken at 0ev), the highlight would be darkened having detail revealed (again compare to the one from 0ev) and the normal brighten objects leaving untouch. Therefore, it could expand the ability of a sensor to record the light, we call it "dynamic range" within a single image.

So there is no meaning to HDR a single image (the dynamic range is fixed when it was captured). Of course, by PS we can partially brighten the shadow/darkened the highlight of a single image for the effect of HDR. But not how HDR (in-camera or by PP) works.

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alcelc
alcelc Forum Pro • Posts: 17,965
Yes or No

Blanky wrote:

PhotoTeach2 wrote:

edhume wrote:

My LX7 has the option of taking three quick shots +/- whatever EV I set, from 1/3 to 3.0. That works great for HDR. It's just not called that.

I must believe the camera you are interested-in has that feature.

That is referred to as "auto-bracketing" .... three separate shots which can be LATER COMBINED via a special HDR software-program.

In-camera HDR is also three shots, (on Panasonic but only 2 on most Nikons), which are then automatically combined into one (HDR) print.

I don't know about the quality of your Canon but I can tell you that the Nikon P-500's HDR was TERRIBLE ... (unusable).

It is very good in the FZ-1000 but many people still prefer manually combining them for sometimes a greater (sometimes abstract) effect which some people love, (like me), but most hate the over-done effect.

look at this photo , there is too much white , i think with HDR this will be better .... what do you think ? it's normal ? i don't think this , with a phone camera with HDR this photo came out better ....

Yes:

By HDR you can darkened the highlight (bright background) and having the gentleman be properly exposed as it was in your sample. But likely it need a bigger range than +/-2ev (the traditional +1ev, 0ev and -1ev). For a higher grade camera support Exposure Bracketing (like 5 shots of 1ev each, i.e., from +2ev to -2ev or even 7 shots etc) might better for the job.

No (alternative):

By flash it could apply extra lighting onto the face of your model allowing a proper exposure as it was, and keep the background from over exposed.

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Albert

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edhume
edhume Contributing Member • Posts: 816
Re: HDR

Thanks. Very valuable info.

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