One thing that makes me chuckle about the Oly f4 300mm…

Started Jan 6, 2016 | Discussions
drj3 Forum Pro • Posts: 11,392
Re: One thing that makes me chuckle about the Oly f4 300mm…
1

Dan wrote:

you mean it weighs more than the new Nikon 300 f4 which covers a larger image circle?

lol...and of course just kidding but kind of funny.

The question of why the extra stops of IS is interesting...not very useful for anything that is moving since the object itself will certainly blur on the longest of exposures and for items not moving shouldn't one be able to use a tripod or will shutter shock be the culprit to not obtaining crystal clear sharpness? Yeah maybe you don't want to lug around a tripod but get creative with the tripod collar and a tree, building edge, ground, car hood/roof, bicycle pannier/seat/handlebars, a string and your foot, or gee whatever else you find around you.

Dan

Many of us chose FTs and then mFTs so that we could get rid of the tripod (over thirty years of using one was enough).

I did use one when I first got the E5 and EC14 with the 70-300 for a moon shot (fortunately the E-M1 removed the tripod necessity for that).  I also setup my tripod with the camera for the last moon eclipse, but sadly the clouds came before the eclipse (I probably will not need one with the 300mm f4 and the E-M1, should another occur with a clear sky).  Other than that, I haven't used one since I got my E510 in 2008.  When you photograph flowers and insects as you move about a garden, there is rarely anything to lean on or for that matter any way to setup a tripod.

I routinely use my E-M1+50-200 or EC14+70-300 down to 1/50.  The ability to go below that will be very useful for insect/flower photography by allowing an ISO of 200 and stopping down for depth of field even with insects in the shade.  Also by allowing up to 6 stops, it should ensure almost 100% of the images not being blurred by camera/lens movement for images requiring less than 6 stops of stabilization.

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drj3

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zuikowesty
zuikowesty Veteran Member • Posts: 4,117
OM-D support makes sense, not sure about PEN; SS=ouch!
2

tt321 wrote:

John King wrote:

rovingtim wrote:

John King wrote:

30% = "sometimes"?

By definition.

I would describe this as 'incredible' ...

It is really good, which is why I mentioned it.

That's not how it came across to me, Tim ...

And 100% @ 1/15th. Pretty amazing stuff.

Yeah and they have decided to punish buyers/owners of the E-M10II, E-P5 and E-M5, among others. Those people are now treated with the same disdain befitting Panasonic camera buyers/owners

To me it makes sense (and I am glad) that they chose to support both the E-M1 and E-M5II for dual IS, as these bodies represent the top tier of the two OM-D form factors - DSLR style grip, and SLR style no-grip. Call me old fashioned, but I still prefer the E-M5 style over the E-M1, which is why I hope to see an E-M5III with the full flagship feature set such as PDAF eventually. While the E-M10 improved upon the E-M5 in some ways, it is still the entry level, and those who need weather sealing (or now dual IS) can pay the extra few $100 to get it. If and when dual IS drops down to sub $1000 lenses, then I would expect to see it across more bodies, but since I'm guessing it's really only an advantage beyond 150mm, those <$1000 lenses will be very few.

As the SLRgear test shows (to my surprise), the much bigger improvement for ALL bodies will be a real 0s anti-shock shutter! I was quite frankly shocked that a lens of this quality and mass can be impacted so badly by SS, even with IS disabled. I would like to see a comparison between the E-M1 and E-M5II with this lens to show any differences in SS, and the HR mode of the E-M5II.

Yes, the E-P5 may be the PEN flagship, but how many PEN users would consider using this lens? A new PEN is imminent, hopefully with a built-in EVF, so we will see if dual IS will appear with it.

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John King
John King Forum Pro • Posts: 14,941
Re: Keep chuckling.....

Gidday Tom

Tom Caldwell wrote:

A realistic balanced response, I guess the main objects of mirth are those that go weak kneed at any thought of not having IBIS on hand .....

Heck I like it, but if i decide to use an old MF lense on a body with no image stabilisation at all then somehow I guess I can manage .....

All my old MF lenses have IBIS available via my E-M1 body. Even my OM mount f/8 500 mm Tokina mirror lens. So do yours ...
You just run into a slight problem with some (most? all?) other brand bodies ...

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Tom Caldwell

Good IBIS just makes it easier to get certain kinds of shots. The one below is only a test shot to check out how the lens performs at f/5.6 and 200 mm. However, without the superb 5 axis IBIS, I would have had to wait for decent light, set up a target outside and used a tripod. Instead, I just snapped the following at 1/10th second ...

There are situations other than test shots where IBIS is extremely useful! This buggered old body isn't anywhere near as steady as it was 50 years ago, and some people have never had that blessing, at any age ...

50-200: ISO 1,000, f/5.6, 1/10th, hand held @ 200 mm ...

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Dan Veteran Member • Posts: 3,979
Re: One thing that makes me chuckle about the Oly f4 300mm…

I would think for flowers in a garden a tripod wouldn't be too hard to set up at all but maybe I don't understand what type of flowers you are photographing or your garden.  My flowers are mostly stationary other than the breeze or slight wind that moves them a little making this movement more than my wobbling anyway...but sometimes I still use the tripod since I want to get various angles...yeah did this a lot with my E-3's and 7-14's and many other lens with and without the 25 mm extension tube.

Lots of times in my backyard I sit on the ground and cross my legs up "high" and sit the camera/lens between my knees or will use a camera bag or railing but mostly since I'm outside I don't find the light so dim to make long exposures too necessary.  Don't know how far down you're stopping your lens though...shouldn't be too great else you give up that depth of field for diffraction loss?

The best thing about photography is the great options we have today and the many tools we can use...me I enjoy tripods and VR heads and equatorial mounts and putting cameras with lens on top of them.

Dan

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drj3 Forum Pro • Posts: 11,392
Re: OM-D support makes sense, not sure about PEN; SS=ouch!

zuikowesty wrote:

tt321 wrote:

John King wrote:

rovingtim wrote:

John King wrote:

30% = "sometimes"?

By definition.

I would describe this as 'incredible' ...

It is really good, which is why I mentioned it.

That's not how it came across to me, Tim ...

And 100% @ 1/15th. Pretty amazing stuff.

Yeah and they have decided to punish buyers/owners of the E-M10II, E-P5 and E-M5, among others. Those people are now treated with the same disdain befitting Panasonic camera buyers/owners

To me it makes sense (and I am glad) that they chose to support both the E-M1 and E-M5II for dual IS, as these bodies represent the top tier of the two OM-D form factors - DSLR style grip, and SLR style no-grip. Call me old fashioned, but I still prefer the E-M5 style over the E-M1, which is why I hope to see an E-M5III with the full flagship feature set such as PDAF eventually. While the E-M10 improved upon the E-M5 in some ways, it is still the entry level, and those who need weather sealing (or now dual IS) can pay the extra few $100 to get it. If and when dual IS drops down to sub $1000 lenses, then I would expect to see it across more bodies, but since I'm guessing it's really only an advantage beyond 150mm, those <$1000 lenses will be very few.

As the SLRgear test shows (to my surprise), the much bigger improvement for ALL bodies will be a real 0s anti-shock shutter! I was quite frankly shocked that a lens of this quality and mass can be impacted so badly by SS, even with IS disabled. I would like to see a comparison between the E-M1 and E-M5II with this lens to show any differences in SS, and the HR mode of the E-M5II.

Yes, the E-P5 may be the PEN flagship, but how many PEN users would consider using this lens? A new PEN is imminent, hopefully with a built-in EVF, so we will see if dual IS will appear with it.

I was surprised that there was so much difference between the AntiShock = 0 and the Electronic Shutter with the 300mm.  I had tested it with my EC14+50-200SWD and found no difference in percent of very sharp images.  I tried with very limited shutter speeds, but now after I saw the difference between the two in the comparison for the 75-300 and the 300mm f4, I now think that my lenses simply were not sharp enough to see the difference (especially since I was photographing stationary birds and not a test target).  Now I want to see if the difference is more evident with the 300mm for my downy woodpeckers.

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drj3

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drj3 Forum Pro • Posts: 11,392
Re: One thing that makes me chuckle about the Oly f4 300mm…

Dan wrote:

I would think for flowers in a garden a tripod wouldn't be too hard to set up at all but maybe I don't understand what type of flowers you are photographing or your garden. My flowers are mostly stationary other than the breeze or slight wind that moves them a little making this movement more than my wobbling anyway...but sometimes I still use the tripod since I want to get various angles...yeah did this a lot with my E-3's and 7-14's and many other lens with and without the 25 mm extension tube.

Lots of times in my backyard I sit on the ground and cross my legs up "high" and sit the camera/lens between my knees or will use a camera bag or railing but mostly since I'm outside I don't find the light so dim to make long exposures too necessary. Don't know how far down you're stopping your lens though...shouldn't be too great else you give up that depth of field for diffraction loss?

The best thing about photography is the great options we have today and the many tools we can use...me I enjoy tripods and VR heads and equatorial mounts and putting cameras with lens on top of them.

Dan

You often need a telephoto to get close enough for photography in my wife's garden and there is no place to put a tripod.  July image.

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drj3

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Hen3ry
OP Hen3ry Forum Pro • Posts: 18,218
Come on tt, that’s silly.
4

tt321 wrote:

John King wrote:

rovingtim wrote:

John King wrote:

30% = "sometimes"?

By definition.

I would describe this as 'incredible' ...

It is really good, which is why I mentioned it.

That's not how it came across to me, Tim ...

And 100% @ 1/15th. Pretty amazing stuff.

Yeah and they have decided to punish buyers/owners of the E-M10II, E-P5 and E-M5, among others. Those people are now treated with the same disdain befitting Panasonic camera buyers/owners

The 300mm lens is a premium lens for premium cameras. The E-M5 has already been replaced, the E-P5 is about to be. The E-M5 II does dual IS, the E-Px will too.

The E-M10 and E-M10 II is a budget camera with a budget IBIS which won't do the same things as the 5 way IBIS will.

Get real.

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Bhima78 Senior Member • Posts: 2,850
Panny may forgo zero-sec anti-shock...

It is possible that Panasonic may just not come out with an EFCS and instead, spend their time refining a global shutter. This would also have the benefit of helping their video refresh rate quality and completely eliminate shutter shock from stills photography.

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Steve_
Steve_ Senior Member • Posts: 2,876
really Henry, just try it

Olympus control dials fail, strap lugs pull out, rubber falls off, and posses at points some pretty baffling control logic. But that IBIS really is worth it. 2-axis Oly stabilization, along with every other IBIS implementation I've tried is positively useless in comparison.

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rashid7
rashid7 Veteran Member • Posts: 6,361
Re: One thing that makes me chuckle about the Oly f4 300mm…
1

I agree wholeheartedly about the exciting potential of dual IBIS/OIS (working together).  Look at the video footage this blogger at "soundimageplus" gets ... its like the camera is on freakin rails!!! (and w/ a canon lens no less!)

http://soundimageplus.blogspot.ae/2016/01/panasonic-gx8-canon-lens-best-is-ever.html

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Keep it fun!

TrapperJohn Forum Pro • Posts: 16,488
On the 300, it does make some sense
1

Sensor shift IS is terrific, especially the Oly 5 axis that bests most OIS implementations, plus you get stabilization on any lens with a known focal length.

But, it does have one limitation: how much the sensor can move.

Not a problem with shorter focal lengths, but at 300mm, the apparent movement that needs to be canceled out is much greater than it would be at 100mm, due to the higher magnification and narrower AOV.

Since OIS moves an element in the lens, the amount that the OIS element has to move is fairly small, to correct the sort of shake that a handheld 300mm lens on a 4/3 sensor (600mm FF AOV) will encounter. Consequently, it can handle a greater range of shake than IBIS can.

OIS on the 300 will probably do a bit better than even the 5 axis IBIS can manage. Since the 300/4 is certainly priced in the 'no compromise' range, putting OIS on it is just another example of making this the best lens possible.

Note that Oly didn't put OIS on the 12-40, or even the 40-150 F2.8. With those shorter focal lengths, it probably wouldn't have made any difference.

MOD Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 43,407
Re: Keep chuckling.....

Guy Parsons wrote:

Tom Caldwell wrote:

A realistic balanced response, I guess the main objects of mirth are those that go weak kneed at any thought of not having IBIS on hand .....

I leave IBIS on all the time with my E-P5 and never think about it, it's just another camera feature that works well.

I always leave my stabilisation on as well.

I can't understand your constant niggling about IBIS when you have it as well and must know that it works and is useful.

I was not talking about long term image stabilser users such as you and I Guy.

I was talking about the semi-frantic comments of some newer to cameras who have almost figuratively wet themself at the thought of perhaps using a Panasonic camera that did not have IBIS built in

I go back to the Canon Pro90 IS and then lenses from Canon with IS built in. I too went through my phase of wondering how I might manage without some sort of camera stabilisation system.

In the bad old days of 2001 with my Pro90 IS I had a camera retailer as a client and often stood po-faced when the fellow was in full-force sales mode selling non-stabilised Olympus superzoom cameras to soccer mums. Yes Olympus was a bit slow to get into image stabilisation but they simply worked hard to claim IBIS as their own once they got started.

It's not a crutch at all, it's just a useful feature that enables slower shutter speeds when appropriate to do so.

Yes, but the only Ricoh camera that had stabilisation has been the GRDIV. The GXR-M with MF lenses taught me that whilst stabilisation was truly useful I could manage without it.

Heck I like it, but if i decide to use an old MF lense on a body with no image stabilisation at all then somehow I guess I can manage .....

Yes, but then there's a whole range of shutter speeds than would not be useful any more.

When I look more carefully at my old film days slides I do see way too often shake and misfocus that was not evident on a projected image. It would have been very nice to have better AF and IBIS on my Nikon N8008s SLR back in the 90's (1990's that is, not 1890's).

No ISO adjustment short of changing to faster film in those days nor the trick of switching to B&W when ISO runs away.  But digital camera manufacturers have been working their butts off with some success to give us useful low noise high ISO.

Regards....... Guy

So yes, stabilisation is good, yes I use it whenever it is provided. Yes it is not necessary on every occasion, in fact in many instances it may be in camera and switched on but not actually doing anything in particular - with fast lenses and/or high shutter speeds. It really is best for the slower kit zoom lenses which it can make into really good performers.

But Canon never thought it necessary to have any image stabilisation on such lenses as 20/1.4, 35/2.0, any of their 50's, 85/.2 and even the 17-35/f2.8, etc, etc.  I never found that I missed it.

Think Panasonic - they also have many lenses without any stablisation and not a glum Panasonic user face in sight.

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Tom Caldwell

Guy Parsons
Guy Parsons Forum Pro • Posts: 37,106
Re: On the 300, it does make some sense
1

TrapperJohn wrote:

Sensor shift IS is terrific, especially the Oly 5 axis that bests most OIS implementations, plus you get stabilization on any lens with a known focal length.

But, it does have one limitation: how much the sensor can move.

Not a problem with shorter focal lengths, but at 300mm, the apparent movement that needs to be canceled out is much greater than it would be at 100mm, due to the higher magnification and narrower AOV.

The E-P5 5 axis IBIS and my 75-300mm at 300mm seems to have no problems at all. Admittedly I try to hold the camera properly and have never attempted to find the IBIS movement limits, but one thing in my favour is that I keep half press stabilisation off so the IBIS always starts from centre during the exposure, that surely must improve my chances.

Since OIS moves an element in the lens, the amount that the OIS element has to move is fairly small, to correct the sort of shake that a handheld 300mm lens on a 4/3 sensor (600mm FF AOV) will encounter. Consequently, it can handle a greater range of shake than IBIS can.

Sure. But I for one can't quite see why it was necessary. Maybe the shakier amongst us needed it.

OIS on the 300 will probably do a bit better than even the 5 axis IBIS can manage. Since the 300/4 is certainly priced in the 'no compromise' range, putting OIS on it is just another example of making this the best lens possible.

Note that Oly didn't put OIS on the 12-40, or even the 40-150 F2.8. With those shorter focal lengths, it probably wouldn't have made any difference.

My concern is where will it all end? Now that we have stabilisation wars do we really need (next I suspect) 10 stops of improvement? That's where it is headed it seems. Better in that case would be to have way better high ISO performance so sensible shutter speeds can be maintained to help stop subject movement.

Regards........ Guy

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tt321
tt321 Forum Pro • Posts: 13,793
Re: OM-D support makes sense, not sure about PEN; SS=ouch!

drj3 wrote:

zuikowesty wrote:

tt321 wrote:

John King wrote:

rovingtim wrote:

John King wrote:

30% = "sometimes"?

By definition.

I would describe this as 'incredible' ...

It is really good, which is why I mentioned it.

That's not how it came across to me, Tim ...

And 100% @ 1/15th. Pretty amazing stuff.

Yeah and they have decided to punish buyers/owners of the E-M10II, E-P5 and E-M5, among others. Those people are now treated with the same disdain befitting Panasonic camera buyers/owners

To me it makes sense (and I am glad) that they chose to support both the E-M1 and E-M5II for dual IS, as these bodies represent the top tier of the two OM-D form factors - DSLR style grip, and SLR style no-grip. Call me old fashioned, but I still prefer the E-M5 style over the E-M1, which is why I hope to see an E-M5III with the full flagship feature set such as PDAF eventually. While the E-M10 improved upon the E-M5 in some ways, it is still the entry level, and those who need weather sealing (or now dual IS) can pay the extra few $100 to get it. If and when dual IS drops down to sub $1000 lenses, then I would expect to see it across more bodies, but since I'm guessing it's really only an advantage beyond 150mm, those <$1000 lenses will be very few.

As the SLRgear test shows (to my surprise), the much bigger improvement for ALL bodies will be a real 0s anti-shock shutter! I was quite frankly shocked that a lens of this quality and mass can be impacted so badly by SS, even with IS disabled. I would like to see a comparison between the E-M1 and E-M5II with this lens to show any differences in SS, and the HR mode of the E-M5II.

Yes, the E-P5 may be the PEN flagship, but how many PEN users would consider using this lens? A new PEN is imminent, hopefully with a built-in EVF, so we will see if dual IS will appear with it.

I was surprised that there was so much difference between the AntiShock = 0 and the Electronic Shutter with the 300mm. I had tested it with my EC14+50-200SWD and found no difference in percent of very sharp images. I tried with very limited shutter speeds, but now after I saw the difference between the two in the comparison for the 75-300 and the 300mm f4, I now think that my lenses simply were not sharp enough to see the difference (especially since I was photographing stationary birds and not a test target). Now I want to see if the difference is more evident with the 300mm for my downy woodpeckers.

It's unlikely to do with your lens not being sharp enough it is plenty sharp.

A more likely hypothesis is mechanical, how they manage the AF and IS with small glass elements and how these elements are hanging in the barrel etc. determine how sensitive the lens might be to shutter shock.

The availability of e-shutter makes it possible for manufacturers to design incredibly shutter shock sensitive lenses to optimize other design objectives.

tt321
tt321 Forum Pro • Posts: 13,793
Re: Come on tt, that’s silly.
1

Hen3ry wrote:

tt321 wrote:

John King wrote:

rovingtim wrote:

John King wrote:

30% = "sometimes"?

By definition.

I would describe this as 'incredible' ...

It is really good, which is why I mentioned it.

That's not how it came across to me, Tim ...

And 100% @ 1/15th. Pretty amazing stuff.

Yeah and they have decided to punish buyers/owners of the E-M10II, E-P5 and E-M5, among others. Those people are now treated with the same disdain befitting Panasonic camera buyers/owners

The 300mm lens is a premium lens for premium cameras. The E-M5 has already been replaced, the E-P5 is about to be. The E-M5 II does dual IS, the E-Px will too.

The E-M10 and E-M10 II is a budget camera with a budget IBIS which won't do the same things as the 5 way IBIS will.

Get real.

Sure. I was responding to a gushing description of the IS performance by pointing out the artificial marketing limitation put on an engineering masterpiece. As an engineer and not a maketeer, I have my biases.

D 503
D 503 Regular Member • Posts: 132
Re: One thing that makes me chuckle about the Oly f4 300mm…

I am wary of this lens.

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TomFid Veteran Member • Posts: 3,698
Re: On the 300, it does make some sense

TrapperJohn wrote:

Sensor shift IS is terrific, especially the Oly 5 axis that bests most OIS implementations, plus you get stabilization on any lens with a known focal length.

But, it does have one limitation: how much the sensor can move.

Not a problem with shorter focal lengths, but at 300mm, the apparent movement that needs to be canceled out is much greater than it would be at 100mm, due to the higher magnification and narrower AOV.

Not so.

Obviously the movement needed to correct for a given angular deflection is proportional to the magnification or FL.

But the angular deflection that occurs during the exposure is proportional to exposure duration, and the baseline duration with which you're judging stops of IS improvement varies with 1/FL.

So, if you're trying to achieve a sharp image for a fixed shutter speed, yes, the movement varies with FL. But that's not the real world. (If it were, IS performance would degrade in proportion to FL, which is obviously not the case.)

If you're trying to achieve a sharp image for a fixed ratio from the 1/FL rule (or whatever you can handhold as a baseline), the movement is relatively independent of FL.

Eperience confirms this. The 300mm zooms get 4.5 stops advantage from 5-axis IBIS, just like any other FL.

Since OIS moves an element in the lens, the amount that the OIS element has to move is fairly small, to correct the sort of shake that a handheld 300mm lens on a 4/3 sensor (600mm FF AOV) will encounter. Consequently, it can handle a greater range of shake than IBIS can.

There are physical limits to what OIS can achieve too. Is there a pure OIS system that achieves more than 4.5 stops?

OIS on the 300 will probably do a bit better than even the 5 axis IBIS can manage. Since the 300/4 is certainly priced in the 'no compromise' range, putting OIS on it is just another example of making this the best lens possible.

Clearly the combination delivers more than either system alone (unlike DPR's experience with the Sony implementation), though personally it wouldn't do me any good, due to subject movement and atmosphere. I think they went too far - but maybe they have some future feature up their sleeve.

Note that Oly didn't put OIS on the 12-40, or even the 40-150 F2.8. With those shorter focal lengths, it probably wouldn't have made any difference.

I suspect the reason is that more than 4.5 stops is already rarely useable at those FLs, again because of subject movement.

zuikowesty
zuikowesty Veteran Member • Posts: 4,117
Re: On the 300, it does make some sense
1

TomFid wrote:

TrapperJohn wrote:

Sensor shift IS is terrific, especially the Oly 5 axis that bests most OIS implementations, plus you get stabilization on any lens with a known focal length.

But, it does have one limitation: how much the sensor can move.

Not a problem with shorter focal lengths, but at 300mm, the apparent movement that needs to be canceled out is much greater than it would be at 100mm, due to the higher magnification and narrower AOV.

Not so.

Obviously the movement needed to correct for a given angular deflection is proportional to the magnification or FL.

But the angular deflection that occurs during the exposure is proportional to exposure duration, and the baseline duration with which you're judging stops of IS improvement varies with 1/FL.

So, if you're trying to achieve a sharp image for a fixed shutter speed, yes, the movement varies with FL. But that's not the real world. (If it were, IS performance would degrade in proportion to FL, which is obviously not the case.)

If you're trying to achieve a sharp image for a fixed ratio from the 1/FL rule (or whatever you can handhold as a baseline), the movement is relatively independent of FL.

Eperience confirms this. The 300mm zooms get 4.5 stops advantage from 5-axis IBIS, just like any other FL.

Since OIS moves an element in the lens, the amount that the OIS element has to move is fairly small, to correct the sort of shake that a handheld 300mm lens on a 4/3 sensor (600mm FF AOV) will encounter. Consequently, it can handle a greater range of shake than IBIS can.

There are physical limits to what OIS can achieve too. Is there a pure OIS system that achieves more than 4.5 stops?

OIS on the 300 will probably do a bit better than even the 5 axis IBIS can manage. Since the 300/4 is certainly priced in the 'no compromise' range, putting OIS on it is just another example of making this the best lens possible.

Clearly the combination delivers more than either system alone (unlike DPR's experience with the Sony implementation), though personally it wouldn't do me any good, due to subject movement and atmosphere. I think they went too far - but maybe they have some future feature up their sleeve.

I suspect that feature is handheld HR mode. This and a true global shutter would allow for some pretty amazing handheld opportunities at this FOV, size and weight.

Note that Oly didn't put OIS on the 12-40, or even the 40-150 F2.8. With those shorter focal lengths, it probably wouldn't have made any difference.

I suspect the reason is that more than 4.5 stops is already rarely useable at those FLs, again because of subject movement.

Agreed, subject movement is often a problem. But the measure of IS performance is based on a standard of acceptable sharpness or lack of motion blur applicable to a single exposure. Let's say that handheld HR mode requires 1/60s exposure time, but, it also requires a higher degree of sharpness/lack of motion blur that effectively equates to the current IS standard less 2 stops to achieve. This means the 75-300 could not effectively do handheld HR mode at 300mm, but the new 300/4 could. Too much IS is never a bad thing; you can always turn it off. (except that in this case it may result in more SS...)

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situman1 Senior Member • Posts: 1,285
Re: really...
1

revio wrote:

situman1 wrote:

Paul Auclair wrote:

tt321 wrote:

John King wrote:

rovingtim wrote:

John King wrote:

30% = "sometimes"?

By definition.

I would describe this as 'incredible' ...

It is really good, which is why I mentioned it.

That's not how it came across to me, Tim ...

And 100% @ 1/15th. Pretty amazing stuff.

Yeah and they have decided to punish buyers/owners of the E-M10II, E-P5 and E-M5, among others. Those people are now treated with the same disdain befitting Panasonic camera buyers/owners

one buys the lesser/least expensive model knowing full well the money(weight) savings come at a cost of less features/capabilities/goodness of the comparable flagship model. if one does not know this then that 'one' is in the wrong and has only oneself to blame and not the manufacturer.

"punishment, disdain"

that is a bizarre (rude/arrogant) way to look at it.

when and how did Olympus force buyers/owners of the E-M10II, E-P5 and E-M5, among others NOT to purchase the company's flagship model. sour grapes much?

BTW the OIS reportedly will still provide significant gains with non flagship bodies.

my first automobile had no A/C, no cruise control, no tilt steering, no heated/leather seats, and had only AM/FM radio. I was fully aware before time of purchase that the same car with all that other stuff was available.

why should I attempt to besmirch that auto's manufacturer because I am driving their car without all of the the fancy bells/whistles of the other cars on the road.

Well the EM10 II is fairly new...no reason for it to not be compatible. Secondly, you KNEW of a model of the same car with the features available, yet YOU made the decision to forgo the features. The major difference was, a choice was given to you and you made the decision. Here, the difference is, Olympus never informed owners of a VERY recent model that its IBIS will not be compatible with the dual IS of the 300mm lens. The consumer didnt have a choice or was not able to make a choice without the correct information.

And since a few weeks or more SOO many (not you perhaps) have complained bitterly of the super high price this 300 lens would cost...

Seems the lens, kind of at least, is aimed at those who already before it came had got themselves one of the hi end cameras. So to speak, at those finding themelves at the higher end of hardware possesion.

It would of course work perfectly well to get this lens and use it on the cheapest OM-D's too, since "99%" of the E-M1/E-M5 II IQ is available already in a E-M10.

However, like few get the Canon EF L 100-400, or that kind of lens, and mount it on a EOS 1000D or the like, few would get the 300mm/4 and use it with a E-M10 MKI or II, irrespectable if the "tandem IS" would have worked...if only just because of the price. Most price consious people get the cheaper bodies, then also get the cheaper lenses. Most of the time, of course some travel "another way".

Well let's put it this way, there are folks out there that would rather spend money on lens than upgrading a body.  Since both the EM10 II and EM5 II are very similar in terms of image quality, folks might not be compelled to upgrade the body.  By artificially limiting a lens feature to your higher end bodies is a disservice to your customers.  Just saying.

(unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 3,010
Re: One thing that makes me chuckle about the Oly f4 300mm…

So why wouldn't it be useful for anything that is moving. Of course it can't stop motion blur bit it can reduce hand shake if your panning with the moving object.

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