No image on memory card error

Started Jan 30, 2015 | Questions
shutterbobby
shutterbobby Contributing Member • Posts: 736
No image on memory card error

Hi just got my new DP3M,popped a SD extreme card in,with other files from Pentax/nikon,took some shots..no problem.Then I get error after trying some more ..no image on memory card,& can't even see the previous ones?? there is a Sigma folder on the card.

Do i need to format in the camera? as I use the same card on 2- 3 diff cameras some times

Thanks Shanti

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MOD Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Forum Pro • Posts: 20,579
Re: No image on memory card error

Although you shouldn't need to format the card with the camera, it is a good idea to do so... try that and try a few more shots.  It could also be the card is getting old...

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SigmaChrome Forum Pro • Posts: 11,750
Re: No image on memory card error
2

I would never use a memory card in camera without formatting it with that camera. It's just safer that way. From my experience, Sigma cameras seem to be more sensitive than most.

I strongly suggest you buy an SD card specifically for the DP3M.

shutterbobby wrote:

Hi just got my new DP3M,popped a SD extreme card in,with other files from Pentax/nikon,took some shots..no problem.Then I get error after trying some more ..no image on memory card,& can't even see the previous ones?? there is a Sigma folder on the card.

Do i need to format in the camera? as I use the same card on 2- 3 diff cameras some times

Thanks Shanti

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photofreak985
photofreak985 Forum Member • Posts: 81
Re: No image on memory card error

shutterbobby wrote:

Hi just got my new DP3M,popped a SD extreme card in,with other files from Pentax/nikon,took some shots..no problem.Then I get error after trying some more ..no image on memory card,& can't even see the previous ones?? there is a Sigma folder on the card.

Do i need to format in the camera? as I use the same card on 2- 3 diff cameras some times

Thanks Shanti

First check the SD card in some other Camera to make sure that its not a Camera issue.

Otherwise, memory Cards are volatile and are to be taken care of. Although it is not recommended to try the same Sd card in various cameras but most of the people do the mistake. Usually branded SD cards are durable.

I will suggest you to format the memory card in the Camera itself. It is a good practice if you have a habit of taking regular backups of your Sd card also.

Scottelly
Scottelly Forum Pro • Posts: 14,217
Re: No image on memory card error

shutterbobby wrote:

Hi just got my new DP3M,popped a SD extreme card in,with other files from Pentax/nikon,took some shots..no problem.Then I get error after trying some more ..no image on memory card,& can't even see the previous ones?? there is a Sigma folder on the card.

Do i need to format in the camera?

Should we assume that you haven't tried to format the card in the camera yet? If so, why not?

as I use the same card on 2- 3 diff cameras some times

Thanks Shanti

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shutterbobby
OP shutterbobby Contributing Member • Posts: 736
Re: No image on memory card error

Its a Sandisk Extreme XDXC1 45MB sec,works fine between 2 Nikons & Pentax.Have reformatted one just for the Sigma,so it works now, but was funny it worked at 1st then stopped,then again,then no more?

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3dreal Senior Member • Posts: 2,271
Re: No image on memory card error

keep all contact clean and format with sd-formatter-

if data should be recovered use photorec. if there are errors dont write/save anymore.

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Scottelly
Scottelly Forum Pro • Posts: 14,217
Re: No image on memory card error

3dreal wrote:

keep all contact clean and format with sd-formatter-

if data should be recovered use photorec. if there are errors dont write/save anymore.

That's pretty confusing. By trying to abbreviate your answer, you have left questions . . . at least in my mind. Are you saying that if there are errors with using an SD card that someone should not use the card anymore? If so, please explain how I could use some of my micro-SD cards many many times with no problems, even after I had some errors with some of them. I believe that many card writing errors are quite often caused by stuff getting on the contacts of the camera or the card or by a software glitch that can be fixed by "rebooting" the camera (removing the battery and replacing it with either the same battery or another fully-charged battery). The software glitches can be a result of a power surge, which could be related to the battery, the temperature of the camera, the humidity level, or some other issue, like corrosion in a circuit. To just say that you think people should stop using a memory card because they had an error once or twice is . . . well . . . not really good advice, as far as I am concerned.

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victorgv Senior Member • Posts: 1,678
Re: No image on memory card error

I would suspect he meant if you have errors using card first recover or copy your data to somewhere else and than reformat it. It is a bad idea to write on corrupted media .

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xpatUSA
xpatUSA Forum Pro • Posts: 16,033
Re: No image on memory card error

Scottelly wrote:

The software glitches can be a result of a power surge, which could be related to the battery, the temperature of the camera, the humidity level, or some other issue, like corrosion in a circuit.

Scot, all of the above seems to be pure supposition.

What is the nature of this "power surge"? How does a battery provide a power surge from it's steady voltage? How does camera temperature causing a "power surge", igualmente humidity level?

and "corrosion in a circuit" !?

Sorry to get pedantic, but that paragraph should not stand unchallenged. Hopefully you have a link or two - like to an IEEE paper about power surges and their causes, for example . .

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Scottelly
Scottelly Forum Pro • Posts: 14,217
Re: No image on memory card error

xpatUSA wrote:

Scottelly wrote:

The software glitches can be a result of a power surge, which could be related to the battery, the temperature of the camera, the humidity level, or some other issue, like corrosion in a circuit.

Scot, all of the above seems to be pure supposition.

What is the nature of this "power surge"? How does a battery provide a power surge from it's steady voltage? How does camera temperature causing a "power surge", igualmente humidity level?

and "corrosion in a circuit" !?

Sorry to get pedantic, but that paragraph should not stand unchallenged. Hopefully you have a link or two - like to an IEEE paper about power surges and their causes, for example . .

I am not a scientist. I am a witch doctor.

The fact is Ted that there ARE power surges in electronic equipment, whether you attribute it to battery power levels or something else. (i.e. the capability of capacitors to maintain power levels, when power is drawn away from them in a variable way, which is something that happens as processing requirements change). As I'm sure you are well aware Ted, all sorts of unexplainable things happen in electronics. My suppositions are not meant to be scientific analyses of the actual problem that occurred . . . just suggestions of what might happen in a case where there is a memory card error of some type.

I visualize electricity flowing in a computerized device somewhat the way water flows in the plumbing system of a house or large, complex, apartment building. Do you know much about that? The pressure surges cause all sorts of weird things to happen, and sometimes they don't come from outside the building. Often the pressure surges might happen based on what is happening inside the building.

As a motor switches on or ramps up in speed, or makes an effort to do something, like change direction, it will draw differing amounts of electricity from the battery. Sometimes the electricity is "buffered" by capacitors enough that such operations don't have a significant affect on other components in the system. Sometimes not. I don't believe that most electrical engineers could really explain to you what is going on, when memory card errors occur, considering they don't know the inner workings of either the computer chips involved, the memory card circuitry, or the entire chain of circuitry and electric motors involved in the process of a memory card error occurrence. Then there's the software/firmware to think about. How are power issues handled in the system, with regard to software processes? As you are well aware, the systems are incredibly complex and unpredictable . . . even by the best analysts, whether they are scientists or not. Then add the possibility of crud on the contacts of the battery, the memory card, or the contacts in the camera. Even NASA can't predict such things. It's like trying to predict where a hurricane will go next. All the supercomputers in the world analyzing all the thousands of data points from surface and sub-surface sensors on the ocean and land, satellite imagery, and even the data collected from weather balloons won't make it possible to be certain of the prediction(s) that might be made.

This is why you need to be a witch doctor, like me, to know these things Ted.

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Cheers,
Ted

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SandyF Forum Pro • Posts: 14,941
Re: No image on memory card error
1

I have a DP3M and various other Sigma as well as Canon cameras. I've used Pentax in the past too. I find it a good practice to use specific memory cards for specific cameras. After I download photos to my computer AND have backed up the photos to external hard drives, I erase the memory card by reformatting the card in camera.

Best regards, Sandy
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xpatUSA
xpatUSA Forum Pro • Posts: 16,033
Re: No image on memory card error

Scottelly wrote:

xpatUSA wrote:

Scottelly wrote:

The software glitches can be a result of a power surge, which could be related to the battery, the temperature of the camera, the humidity level, or some other issue, like corrosion in a circuit.

Scot, all of the above seems to be pure supposition.

What is the nature of this "power surge"? How does a battery provide a power surge from it's steady voltage? How does camera temperature causing a "power surge", igualmente humidity level?

and "corrosion in a circuit" !?

Sorry to get pedantic, but that paragraph should not stand unchallenged. Hopefully you have a link or two - like to an IEEE paper about power surges and their causes, for example . .

I am not a scientist. I am a witch doctor.

The fact is Ted that there ARE power surges in electronic equipment, whether you attribute it to battery power levels or something else.

I'll ask again - what is a "power surge"?

I visualize electricity flowing in a computerized device somewhat the way water flows in the plumbing system of a house or large, complex, apartment building. Do you know much about that?

I know a lot about the hydraulic analogy. How much do you know?

As a motor switches on or ramps up in speed, or makes an effort to do something, like change direction, it will draw differing amounts of electricity from the battery. Sometimes the electricity is "buffered" by capacitors enough that such operations don't have a significant affect on other components in the system.

Capacitors hold charge, to be precise. I have never seen their action described as "buffering" . . until now.

Sometimes not. I don't believe that most electrical engineers could really explain to you what is going on, when memory card errors occur, considering they don't know the inner workings of either the computer chips involved, the memory card circuitry, or the entire chain of circuitry and electric motors involved in the process of a memory card error occurrence.

Not surprising, really. Electrical Engineers are versed in electrical power generation, distribution and site or building wiring.

Then there's the software/firmware to think about. How are power issues handled in the system, with regard to software processes? As you are well aware, the systems are incredibly complex and unpredictable . . . even by the best analysts, whether they are scientists or not. Then add the possibility of crud on the contacts of the battery, the memory card, or the contacts in the camera. Even NASA can't predict such things. It's like trying to predict where a hurricane will go next. All the supercomputers in the world analyzing all the thousands of data points from surface and sub-surface sensors on the ocean and land, satellite imagery, and even the data collected from weather balloons won't make it possible to be certain of the prediction(s) that might be made.

Scot, you are entitled to have your opinions, of course. It's when they get posted as implicit facts that others, less knowledgeable than our good selves, can become misinformed.

This is why you need to be a witch doctor, like me, to know these things Ted.

LOL

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Cheers,
Ted

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Gesture Veteran Member • Posts: 6,691
Re: No image on memory card error

I have not taken the trouble to log results, but using many cameras, I can't assign a set behavior.

Sometimes, I can put a card used in one camera in another and everything is fine; others times the camera will store to the card fine, but not be able to view the images totally or at all in playback; and other times, a reformat is prompted.  Interestingly, even within an OEM, there is sometimes incompatibility.

Like others, I generally reformat in camera before taking any new images with a given card.

Scottelly
Scottelly Forum Pro • Posts: 14,217
Re: No image on memory card error

xpatUSA wrote:

Scottelly wrote:

xpatUSA wrote:

Scottelly wrote:

The software glitches can be a result of a power surge, which could be related to the battery, the temperature of the camera, the humidity level, or some other issue, like corrosion in a circuit.

Scot, all of the above seems to be pure supposition.

What is the nature of this "power surge"? How does a battery provide a power surge from it's steady voltage? How does camera temperature causing a "power surge", igualmente humidity level?

and "corrosion in a circuit" !?

Sorry to get pedantic, but that paragraph should not stand unchallenged. Hopefully you have a link or two - like to an IEEE paper about power surges and their causes, for example . .

I am not a scientist. I am a witch doctor.

The fact is Ted that there ARE power surges in electronic equipment, whether you attribute it to battery power levels or something else.

I'll ask again - what is a "power surge"?

Maybe I'm using the term incorrectly Ted. In my uninformed opinion a power surge is a fluctuation in power that is greater than what is typical for a system. What might be considered a power surge in one system could actually be considered a very smooth flow (and I might be using these terms incorrectly, because I am such a layman) of power. To me, a power surge is similar to what is experienced in a home, when a lightning strikes nearby and some electronic equipment gets "burned out" or a light bulb or two (or more) gets blown out, because there is a "power surge" in the electricity of the house, even though it might not burn out fuses or trip circuit breakers.

You may think of what I am calling a power surge as a voltage spike.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voltage_spike

I have bought a number of "surge protector" devices over the years. That is why I call them "power surges" . . . even though technically such a thing might not exist, in the electrical engineering world. There is a reason they're called "surge" protectors . . . even if the reason is purely about marketing the products. There's also a reason why I call it a "power" surge, rather than an electricity surge or electricity spike or a voltage spike. I don't believe it's just about voltage, but I very well might be wrong in my thinking.

I visualize electricity flowing in a computerized device somewhat the way water flows in the plumbing system of a house or large, complex, apartment building. Do you know much about that?

I know a lot about the hydraulic analogy. How much do you know?

Not that much. Maybe you can school me on it.

As a motor switches on or ramps up in speed, or makes an effort to do something, like change direction, it will draw differing amounts of electricity from the battery. Sometimes the electricity is "buffered" by capacitors enough that such operations don't have a significant affect on other components in the system.

Capacitors hold charge, to be precise. I have never seen their action described as "buffering" . . until now.

Capacitors are used in high-powered automotive (and other) stereo systems to allow big amps to supply enough power to huge speaker systems Ted. They are also used on motherboards to reduce the affects of "power surges" (or voltage fluctuations maybe?) from the power supply (or is it related to fluctuating draws of power by the CPU?). That's about the extent of what I know Ted. Maybe you can learn more by reading this:

http://www.radio-electronics.com/info/circuits/diode-rectifier/rectifier-filtering-smoothing-capacitor-circuits.php

. . . or this:

http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/148575/how-does-a-capacitor-smooth-energy

Sometimes not. I don't believe that most electrical engineers could really explain to you what is going on, when memory card errors occur, considering they don't know the inner workings of either the computer chips involved, the memory card circuitry, or the entire chain of circuitry and electric motors involved in the process of a memory card error occurrence.

Not surprising, really. Electrical Engineers are versed in electrical power generation, distribution and site or building wiring.

Am I mistaken when I think that there are electrical engineers that also do things like designing circuitry for computers and other electronics Ted? A girlfriend of mine was an electrical engineer (that's what he called himself) for Motorola, and I believe he told me that he was working on circuit board design for cell phones at the time I had a conversation with him about what he does at Motorola.

Then there's the software/firmware to think about. How are power issues handled in the system, with regard to software processes? As you are well aware, the systems are incredibly complex and unpredictable . . . even by the best analysts, whether they are scientists or not. Then add the possibility of crud on the contacts of the battery, the memory card, or the contacts in the camera. Even NASA can't predict such things. It's like trying to predict where a hurricane will go next. All the supercomputers in the world analyzing all the thousands of data points from surface and sub-surface sensors on the ocean and land, satellite imagery, and even the data collected from weather balloons won't make it possible to be certain of the prediction(s) that might be made.

Scot, you are entitled to have your opinions, of course. It's when they get posted as implicit facts that others, less knowledgeable than our good selves, can become misinformed.

I'm not misinforming them, as far as I am aware. My voodoo is good stuff Ted.

You can't prove God doesn't exist, can you Ted?

This is why you need to be a witch doctor, like me, to know these things Ted.

LOL

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Cheers,
Ted

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Scottelly
Scottelly Forum Pro • Posts: 14,217
Re: No image on memory card error
1

Gesture wrote:

I have not taken the trouble to log results, but using many cameras, I can't assign a set behavior.

Sometimes, I can put a card used in one camera in another and everything is fine; others times the camera will store to the card fine, but not be able to view the images totally or at all in playback; and other times, a reformat is prompted. Interestingly, even within an OEM, there is sometimes incompatibility.

Like others, I generally reformat in camera before taking any new images with a given card.

I think I'd agree with your sentiments about formatting memory cards. Years ago I learned that it is "safer" to just format a card, rather than deleting its contents or relying on the way it is formatted when I put it into the camera. These days I just do it to "erase" the photos on it, in order to make space (since my cards are almost always full when I put one in my camera to use it). I find formatting it works great, and it seems like the "right thing to do." What better way is there?

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xpatUSA
xpatUSA Forum Pro • Posts: 16,033
Re: No image on memory card error

Scottelly wrote:

xpatUSA wrote:

Scottelly wrote:

xpatUSA wrote:

Scottelly wrote:

The software glitches can be a result of a power surge, which could be related to the battery, the temperature of the camera, the humidity level, or some other issue, like corrosion in a circuit.

Scot, all of the above seems to be pure supposition.

What is the nature of this "power surge"? How does a battery provide a power surge from it's steady voltage? How does camera temperature causing a "power surge", igualmente humidity level?

and "corrosion in a circuit" !?

Sorry to get pedantic, but that paragraph should not stand unchallenged. Hopefully you have a link or two - like to an IEEE paper about power surges and their causes, for example . .

I am not a scientist. I am a witch doctor.

The fact is Ted that there ARE power surges in electronic equipment, whether you attribute it to battery power levels or something else.

I'll ask again - what is a "power surge"?

Maybe I'm using the term incorrectly Ted. In my uninformed opinion a power surge is a fluctuation in power that is greater than what is typical for a system. What might be considered a power surge in one system could actually be considered a very smooth flow (and I might be using these terms incorrectly, because I am such a layman) of power. To me, a power surge is similar to what is experienced in a home, when a lightning strikes nearby and some electronic equipment gets "burned out" or a light bulb or two (or more) gets blown out, because there is a "power surge" in the electricity of the house, even though it might not burn out fuses or trip circuit breakers.

You may think of what I am calling a power surge as a voltage spike.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voltage_spike

I have bought a number of "surge protector" devices over the years. That is why I call them "power surges" . . . even though technically such a thing might not exist, in the electrical engineering world. There is a reason they're called "surge" protectors . . . even if the reason is purely about marketing the products. There's also a reason why I call it a "power" surge, rather than an electricity surge or electricity spike or a voltage spike. I don't believe it's just about voltage, but I very well might be wrong in my thinking.

I visualize electricity flowing in a computerized device somewhat the way water flows in the plumbing system of a house or large, complex, apartment building. Do you know much about that?

I know a lot about the hydraulic analogy. How much do you know?

Not that much. Maybe you can school me on it.

As a motor switches on or ramps up in speed, or makes an effort to do something, like change direction, it will draw differing amounts of electricity from the battery. Sometimes the electricity is "buffered" by capacitors enough that such operations don't have a significant affect on other components in the system.

Capacitors hold charge, to be precise. I have never seen their action described as "buffering" . . until now.

Capacitors are used in high-powered automotive (and other) stereo systems to allow big amps to supply enough power to huge speaker systems Ted. They are also used on motherboards to reduce the affects of "power surges" (or voltage fluctuations maybe?) from the power supply (or is it related to fluctuating draws of power by the CPU?). That's about the extent of what I know Ted. Maybe you can learn more by reading this:

http://www.radio-electronics.com/info/circuits/diode-rectifier/rectifier-filtering-smoothing-capacitor-circuits.php

. . . or this:

http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/148575/how-does-a-capacitor-smooth-energy

Sometimes not. I don't believe that most electrical engineers could really explain to you what is going on, when memory card errors occur, considering they don't know the inner workings of either the computer chips involved, the memory card circuitry, or the entire chain of circuitry and electric motors involved in the process of a memory card error occurrence.

Not surprising, really. Electrical Engineers are versed in electrical power generation, distribution and site or building wiring.

Am I mistaken when I think that there are electrical engineers that also do things like designing circuitry for computers and other electronics Ted? A girlfriend of mine was an electrical engineer (that's what he called himself) for Motorola, and I believe he told me that he was working on circuit board design for cell phones at the time I had a conversation with him about what he does at Motorola.

Then there's the software/firmware to think about. How are power issues handled in the system, with regard to software processes? As you are well aware, the systems are incredibly complex and unpredictable . . . even by the best analysts, whether they are scientists or not. Then add the possibility of crud on the contacts of the battery, the memory card, or the contacts in the camera. Even NASA can't predict such things. It's like trying to predict where a hurricane will go next. All the supercomputers in the world analyzing all the thousands of data points from surface and sub-surface sensors on the ocean and land, satellite imagery, and even the data collected from weather balloons won't make it possible to be certain of the prediction(s) that might be made.

Scot, you are entitled to have your opinions, of course. It's when they get posted as implicit facts that others, less knowledgeable than our good selves, can become misinformed.

I'm not misinforming them, as far as I am aware. My voodoo is good stuff Ted.

You can't prove God doesn't exist, can you Ted?

This is why you need to be a witch doctor, like me, to know these things Ted.

LOL

This discussion is ridiculous. I fold.

-- hide signature --

Cheers,
Ted

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Johan Borg Senior Member • Posts: 2,873
Re: No image on memory card error
1

Scottelly wrote:

Gesture wrote:

I have not taken the trouble to log results, but using many cameras, I can't assign a set behavior.

Sometimes, I can put a card used in one camera in another and everything is fine; others times the camera will store to the card fine, but not be able to view the images totally or at all in playback; and other times, a reformat is prompted. Interestingly, even within an OEM, there is sometimes incompatibility.

Like others, I generally reformat in camera before taking any new images with a given card.

I think I'd agree with your sentiments about formatting memory cards. Years ago I learned that it is "safer" to just format a card, rather than deleting its contents or relying on the way it is formatted when I put it into the camera. These days I just do it to "erase" the photos on it, in order to make space (since my cards are almost always full when I put one in my camera to use it). I find formatting it works great, and it seems like the "right thing to do." What better way is there?

Formatting on a computer that also overwrites existing content, for example with Disk Utility for Mac.

The in-camera formatting of the DP2 Quattro, for example, renders the card unreadable for my Samsung tablet. Cards that rendered earlier Sigma cameras unstable also required a deep formatting on a computer to improve.

Once formatted, I turn on the write protection of my cards every time I use them with another device than the camera.

Big Ga Forum Pro • Posts: 18,624
Re: No image on memory card error

xpatUSA wrote:

Scottelly wrote:

The software glitches can be a result of a power surge, which could be related to the battery, the temperature of the camera, the humidity level, or some other issue, like corrosion in a circuit.

Scot, all of the above seems to be pure supposition.

What is the nature of this "power surge"? How does a battery provide a power surge from it's steady voltage?

I don't believe Scott claimed the battery provided a 'power surge'. The text quoted indicates that its 'related to the battery'.

Sorry to get pedantic, but since that seems to be the way of many things here  

3dreal Senior Member • Posts: 2,271
Re: No image on memory card error

Scottelly wrote:

3dreal wrote:

keep all contact clean and format with sd-formatter-

if data should be recovered use photorec. if there are errors dont write/save anymore.

That's pretty confusing. By trying to abbreviate your answer, you have left questions . . . at least in my mind. Are you saying that if there are errors with using an SD card that someone should not use the card anymore? If so, please explain how I could use some of my micro-SD cards many many times with no problems, even after I had some errors with some of them. I believe that many card writing errors are quite often caused by stuff getting on the contacts of the camera or the card or by a software glitch that can be fixed by "rebooting" the camera (removing the battery and replacing it with either the same battery or another fully-charged battery). The software glitches can be a result of a power surge, which could be related to the battery, the temperature of the camera, the humidity level, or some other issue, like corrosion in a circuit. To just say that you think people should stop using a memory card because they had an error once or twice is . . . well . . . not really good advice, as far as I am concerned.

No i wanted to say, when data cannot be seen anymore one must stop using the card until they are saved. not touching it except cleaning and retrying to view data. then if still no success using photorec. if possible cloning the card.

maybe data can be seen and copied with knoppix-live-dvd. others and me were succesfull at least with hardrives where data were "lost" on windows-systems.

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