10 reasons why Jason Lanier went mirrorless

Started Oct 7, 2014 | Discussions
DFPanno
DFPanno Veteran Member • Posts: 5,502
Re: My problem with this video.....
1

sean lancaster wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

narenek wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

gkstar wrote:

Probably not that well ballanced but a lot of truth. This is a good way to break the stereotypes out there.

The lack of balance diminishes the persausiveness of his presentation.

The fact is that most pros cannot depend on mirror-less alone at this point.

I would never hire someone whose intent was to shoot my daughter's wedding solely with a Sony A7S (by way of example).

Bet he will rent a DSLR when he needs it.

Of course it's not balanced. He's giving the reasons he changed not making a comparison between the systems, the reasons will always be in favour of the Sony because otherwise he wouldn't have made the choice to change.

Is that he makes it sound as though Sony has it "all over" Canikon when the truth is that it doesn't and any real pro will almost inevitably turn to their products for items that Sony does not currently sell.

If this guy is hired tomorrow to do a promo for NASCAR do you think he is going to arrive at the track with an A6000? An A7S?

Sony cannot compete in the DSLR world (for the moment) and their marketing strategy is to show people that they really don't need a DSLR. That is true in many cases but not all.

To be fair to the guy, his website notes he shoots wedding, landscapes (and combines landscapes with wedding shoots) and pinup shots. He is not claiming that sports photographers should switch. I wonder if he just shoots artistic shots for couples and someone else does the actual weddings??? Anyway, for what he does, he seems to have found mirrorless to work. He also claims to be the wedding photographer for NFL players, MLB players, resorts, and so on. I looked through some of his portfolio and he appears to dazzle clients with a lot of HDR type photography. Meh. But people pay for that kind of stuff, so more power to him. And if he can make his money using smaller equipment then all the better.

A lot of pros could make the switch without harm. A lot couldn't make the switch. All depends.

Good points.   If you can make x work for for you than y and z is not important.

My guess is that most pros could not abandon their DSLRs at this point in time.

It really does depend on what you are hired to do and what your client expects.

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nevercat Veteran Member • Posts: 3,193
Re: IQ is not the issue…...
4

DFPanno wrote:

nevercat wrote:


You must look at the great pictures people took with their mirrorless cameras (from m43 up to FF) and accept that IQ is not in the cmaera anymore, but only in the photograper, as any camera is good enough to take excelent pictures. Those pictures only look realy different at pixel level.

IQ is clearly not an issue at this point.

What would be an issue for me is operational speed and predictability.

At this point DSLRs still operate on a plane that MILCs can't touch and that capability is what I would be looking for in any critical shoot.

When in a dynamic enviroment in which getting the shot is critical DSLRs still rule the roost.

You ever see a papparazzo with a MILC?

Will you hire any papparazzo for your daughters wedding just for having a DSLR? Are you sure?

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sean lancaster
sean lancaster Veteran Member • Posts: 7,365
Re: IQ is not the issue…...
1

Wedding photographer weighs in today on the A7s: http://www.govindarumi.com/sony-a7s-for-weddings-real-world-review/

He shot his last 2 weddings with the A7s. Ultimate conclusion:

It has to be said that after using this camera in the last two weddings, and 90% most of those times. The era of mirror-less cameras replacing DSLR for weddings is near. My only concern is that I still trust my DSLR too much for important moments.

EDIT: I guess it's not as dramatic as noted above. In a message to me, he noted that he doesn't have any Emount lenses so he trusts the DSLR over his manual focusing on the A7s.

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DFPanno
DFPanno Veteran Member • Posts: 5,502
Bingo.
7

sean lancaster wrote:

Wedding photographer weighs in today on the A7s: http://www.govindarumi.com/sony-a7s-for-weddings-real-world-review/

He shot his last 2 weddings with the A7s. Ultimate conclusion:

It has to be said that after using this camera in the last two weddings, and 90% most of those times. The era of mirror-less cameras replacing DSLR for weddings is near. My only concern is that I still trust my DSLR too much for important moments.

That comment says it all.

In my theoretical "daughter's wedding" every moment is an important moment to me.

As a client my expectation is that you are going to nab the shot, no ifs. ands, or buts. That's what I am paying you to do.

If I would be satisfied with mostly good shots I would let Uncle Jerry do the wedding and save a couple of bucks.

As I have said before on these forums - When I have an important moment to capture I will always grab my FF DSLR despite the fact that my FF mirror-less cameras have better IQ.

If you don't get the shot no amount of IQ is going to help you……..

I would imagine that sometime fairly soon these cameras will advance to the point where the differences between them are academic. That is not true now.

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The Incredible Hoke
The Incredible Hoke Contributing Member • Posts: 894
Re: Bingo.
7

Intresting video. I switched from Nikon this summer when I tried an a6000. After a month with the a6000 I traded my FF Nikon in for a Sony a7. The a7 is the only I camera I'm using for event and portrait shoots right now. And I shoot it with manual lenses so I don't care about AF speed.

I know what moments I want and I know how to get them. That's just as important as your equipment. We've forgotten that in the era of the do-everything-for-you DSLR.

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nevercat Veteran Member • Posts: 3,193
Re: Bingo.
4

ShawnHoke wrote:

Intresting video. I switched from Nikon this summer when I tried an a6000. After a month with the a6000 I traded my FF Nikon in for a Sony a7. The a7 is the only I camera I'm using for event and portrait shoots right now. And I shoot it with manual lenses so I don't care about AF speed.

I know what moments I want and I know how to get them. That's just as important as your equipment. We've forgotten that in the era of the do-everything-for-you DSLR.

Bingo! you don't judge a carpenter by its tools, but by the work he do with them...

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DFPanno
DFPanno Veteran Member • Posts: 5,502
You have missed the point......
4

nevercat wrote:

ShawnHoke wrote:

Intresting video. I switched from Nikon this summer when I tried an a6000. After a month with the a6000 I traded my FF Nikon in for a Sony a7. The a7 is the only I camera I'm using for event and portrait shoots right now. And I shoot it with manual lenses so I don't care about AF speed.

I know what moments I want and I know how to get them. That's just as important as your equipment. We've forgotten that in the era of the do-everything-for-you DSLR.

Bingo! you don't judge a carpenter by its tools, but by the work he do with them...

"Don't judge a carpenter by by his tools" and other such bromides have their use but that is not really my point.

Carpenters do judge other carpenter by their tools whether you like it or not.

If I see a carpenter using a claw hammer where a cross pein is indicated I do judge him.

Maybe he doesn't care that the one is better than the other or maybe he is too ignorant to know the difference. Perhaps he feels that having both is not worthwhile; etc., etc.

At the end of the day he isn't doing my joinery because being properly equipped is one of the first requirements in doing an equipment-dependent job properly.

Your old saw is OK for general conversation but it is quickly dismissed once we move the conversation up a notch.

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JurijTurnsek Contributing Member • Posts: 505
Re: Bingo.

DFPanno wrote:

sean lancaster wrote:

Wedding photographer weighs in today on the A7s: http://www.govindarumi.com/sony-a7s-for-weddings-real-world-review/

He shot his last 2 weddings with the A7s. Ultimate conclusion:

It has to be said that after using this camera in the last two weddings, and 90% most of those times. The era of mirror-less cameras replacing DSLR for weddings is near. My only concern is that I still trust my DSLR too much for important moments.

That comment says it all.

In my theoretical "daughter's wedding" every moment is an important moment to me.

As a client my expectation is that you are going to nab the shot, no ifs. ands, or buts. That's what I am paying you to do.

If I would be satisfied with mostly good shots I would let Uncle Jerry do the wedding and save a couple of bucks.

As I have said before on these forums - When I have an important moment to capture I will always grab my FF DSLR despite the fact that my FF mirror-less cameras have better IQ.

If you don't get the shot no amount of IQ is going to help you……..

I would imagine that sometime fairly soon these cameras will advance to the point where the differences between them are academic. That is not true now.

Take that with a grain of salt since that review only used manual focus lenses and didn't try AF even once. The reviewer also wants more megapixels - he/she should have try a7R since the ISO performance is similar once you resize your images.

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The Incredible Hoke
The Incredible Hoke Contributing Member • Posts: 894
Re: You have missed the point......
3

DFPanno wrote:

nevercat wrote:

ShawnHoke wrote:

Intresting video. I switched from Nikon this summer when I tried an a6000. After a month with the a6000 I traded my FF Nikon in for a Sony a7. The a7 is the only I camera I'm using for event and portrait shoots right now. And I shoot it with manual lenses so I don't care about AF speed.

I know what moments I want and I know how to get them. That's just as important as your equipment. We've forgotten that in the era of the do-everything-for-you DSLR.

Bingo! you don't judge a carpenter by its tools, but by the work he do with them...

"Don't judge a carpenter by by his tools" and other such bromides have their use but that is not really my point.

Carpenters do judge other carpenter by their tools whether you like it or not.

If I see a carpenter using a claw hammer where a cross pein is indicated I do judge him.

Maybe he doesn't care that the one is better than the other or maybe he is too ignorant to know the difference. Perhaps he doesn't feel that having both is not worthwhile; etc., etc.

At the end of the day he isn't doing my joinery because being properly equipped is one of the first requirements in doing an equipment-dependent job properly.

Your old saw is OK for general conversation but it is quickly dismissed once we move the conversation up a notch.

The saying nevercat used might be an "old saw," however tools only get you so far. You need to know how to use the tools. If a photographer needs a blazing fast autofocus DSLR from Canon or Nikon to shoot a portrait or landscape, then said photographer is doing it wrong.

You mentioned weddings; there's a huge group of very high level wedding photogrpahers charging a fortune and getting it and they shoot medium format film. Several of them are booked out over a year in advance.

And I've seen plenty of photographers with the latest and greatest cameras who can't seem to get past HDR and other trite shots.

It's not only the camera.

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DFPanno
DFPanno Veteran Member • Posts: 5,502
Please…...
3

ShawnHoke wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

nevercat wrote:

ShawnHoke wrote:

Intresting video. I switched from Nikon this summer when I tried an a6000. After a month with the a6000 I traded my FF Nikon in for a Sony a7. The a7 is the only I camera I'm using for event and portrait shoots right now. And I shoot it with manual lenses so I don't care about AF speed.

I know what moments I want and I know how to get them. That's just as important as your equipment. We've forgotten that in the era of the do-everything-for-you DSLR.

Bingo! you don't judge a carpenter by its tools, but by the work he do with them...

"Don't judge a carpenter by by his tools" and other such bromides have their use but that is not really my point.

Carpenters do judge other carpenter by their tools whether you like it or not.

If I see a carpenter using a claw hammer where a cross pein is indicated I do judge him.

Maybe he doesn't care that the one is better than the other or maybe he is too ignorant to know the difference. Perhaps he doesn't feel that having both is not worthwhile; etc., etc.

At the end of the day he isn't doing my joinery because being properly equipped is one of the first requirements in doing an equipment-dependent job properly.

Your old saw is OK for general conversation but it is quickly dismissed once we move the conversation up a notch.

The saying nevercat used might be an "old saw," however tools only get you so far. You need to know how to use the tools. If a photographer needs a blazing fast autofocus DSLR from Canon or Nikon to shoot a portrait or landscape, then said photographer is doing it wrong.

Some of the world's most esteemed photographers have spent millions upon millions of dollars on Canon and Nikon gear.

Part of the reason that they are willing to spend that money is because both companies (particularly Canon) have offered "blazing fast" auto-focus.

Your suggestion that this first-tier of photographers "has it wrong" baffles me.

Take a look at any new camera introduction and you will see extensive reference to the cameras AF capabilities. Why? Because AF is central to a modern camera's desirabilty.

You mentioned weddings; there's a huge group of very high level wedding photogrpahers charging a fortune and getting it and they shoot medium format film. Several of them are booked out over a year in advance.

I would be willing to bet  you that not all shots are taken with MF film. Maybe some of the formal images.

You have suggested in previous posts that your abilities allow you to transcend the need for AF at event photography.  I have no real reason to doubt you as I don't know you but I can assure you that you are playing at a very rarified level of image capture.

I have a lot of experience with photography; the vast majority with MF gear. I enjoy the notion that I am pretty good at MF.

That said:

There is no way in the world that I could utilize MF to out-gun someone using a 5D3 on AF to capture a spontaneous moment.  You can and for that I will tip my cap.

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The Incredible Hoke
The Incredible Hoke Contributing Member • Posts: 894
Re: Please…...
2

DFPanno wrote:

ShawnHoke wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

nevercat wrote:

ShawnHoke wrote:

Intresting video. I switched from Nikon this summer when I tried an a6000. After a month with the a6000 I traded my FF Nikon in for a Sony a7. The a7 is the only I camera I'm using for event and portrait shoots right now. And I shoot it with manual lenses so I don't care about AF speed.

I know what moments I want and I know how to get them. That's just as important as your equipment. We've forgotten that in the era of the do-everything-for-you DSLR.

Bingo! you don't judge a carpenter by its tools, but by the work he do with them...

"Don't judge a carpenter by by his tools" and other such bromides have their use but that is not really my point.

Carpenters do judge other carpenter by their tools whether you like it or not.

If I see a carpenter using a claw hammer where a cross pein is indicated I do judge him.

Maybe he doesn't care that the one is better than the other or maybe he is too ignorant to know the difference. Perhaps he doesn't feel that having both is not worthwhile; etc., etc.

At the end of the day he isn't doing my joinery because being properly equipped is one of the first requirements in doing an equipment-dependent job properly.

Your old saw is OK for general conversation but it is quickly dismissed once we move the conversation up a notch.

The saying nevercat used might be an "old saw," however tools only get you so far. You need to know how to use the tools. If a photographer needs a blazing fast autofocus DSLR from Canon or Nikon to shoot a portrait or landscape, then said photographer is doing it wrong.

Some of the world's most esteemed photographers have spent millions upon millions of dollars on Canon and Nikon gear.

Part of the reason that they are willing to spend that money is because both companies (particularly Canon) have offered "blazing fast" auto-focus.

For sports and a few other things blazing fast AF is important. However, I can’t count the number of threads on here of people complaining about AF problems. I myself had back button focus AF fail several times with my Nikon DSLR in poor light. Usually when I needed it most and almost always with my 85mm f1.4.

Your suggestion that this first-tier of photographers "has it wrong" baffles me.

Sorry, I didn't word that correctly; just suggesting that you don't need the latest and greatest DSLR for many things.

Take a look at any new camera introduction and you will see extensive reference to the cameras AF capabilities. Why? Because AF is central to a modern camera's desirabilty.

You mentioned weddings; there's a huge group of very high level wedding photogrpahers charging a fortune and getting it and they shoot medium format film. Several of them are booked out over a year in advance.

I would be willing to bet you that not all shots are taken with MF film. Maybe some of the formal images.

I’m not sure about "all shots," but my friend is a high level wedding planner in SF and she has even mentioned how many photographers are specializing in medium format film to set themselves apart from what she calls the “spray and pray” photographers.

You have suggested in previous posts that your abilities allow you to transcend the need for AF at event photography. I have no real reason to doubt you as I don't know you but I can assure you that you are playing at a very rarified level of image capture.

My abilities are probably not that much different from anyone else who spends a little time practicing with MF and the right camera. I found the a7 so easy to focus manually (with the proper lenses of course) that those two clicks of the magnification button and a quick twist is just as easy as using back button AF on a Nikon DSLR.

It does take paying attention to things as they are happening and looking for the right moments, but it’s not anything special at all. You could most likely do the same if you wanted to. <— I think that’s the difference. I will admit that AF is very easy to use once you tune your camera combo the right way. But so is MF if you have the proper tool, i.e. something like the a7 series with peaking and magnification.

I have a lot of experience with photography; the vast majority with MF gear. I enjoy the notion that I am pretty good at MF.

You probably are! I had relied on my Nikon AF for many years, but when I switched it came back to me like riding a bike.

That said:

There is no way in the world that I could utilize MF to out-gun someone using a 5D3 on AF to capture a spontaneous moment. You can and for that I will tip my cap.

Ha, yeah I don’t think I’m going to outgun anyone with a 5D3. However, I do know that I am in tune with the event or session enough to get the shots that matter.

That’s not gear. That’s paying attention and focusing.

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codex22
codex22 Forum Member • Posts: 98
Re: Yes I would.......
4

DFPanno wrote:

nevercat wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

gkstar wrote:

Probably not that well ballanced but a lot of truth. This is a good way to break the stereotypes out there.

The lack of balance diminishes the persausiveness of his presentation.

The fact is that most pros cannot depend on mirror-less alone at this point.

I would never hire someone whose intent was to shoot my daughter's wedding solely with a Sony A7S (by way of example).

Bet he will rent a DSLR when he needs it.

Do you realy look at the gear a person is using and not at his portfolio. When I would hire a photograph I don't care with what camera he shoots, as long as the results are great. I don't know his work, so I don't know if I would hire him, but I will never let that depend on the gear he is using. When he makes beautifull pictures with a LOMO camera then that is what he use and he can get the job, when he takes very bad pictures with the latest hasselblad...

(don't get me wrong, I don't think that it is possible to take great pictures with a Lomo camera, but when someone succeed in that I will hire him over someone without good pictures)

I am too knowledgeable and experienced with photography not to look at the photographer's' gear.

I own and operate all formats and I know the limits of each category of equipment.

You want to shoot my daughter's wedding with just a mirror-less camera? Buh-bye.

My opinion will probably change in a generation or two but that's where I am as of today.

Wow, that really baffles me.

So let's say you hire a professional with a long established record as a great wedding photographer. He then shows up with a mirrorless camera, telling you that he has switched over exclusively with same or better results than his DSLR gear, and you would still send him away?

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Timbukto Veteran Member • Posts: 4,988
Re: 10 reasons why Jason Lanier went mirrorless

Share his enthusiasm for the A6000, but he is wrong in several areas.  He complains about more expensive gear leaving out built in flash... yet this is exactly what the A7 series does as well.  File compatibility is a Nikon only problem it appears, never had it with my Canons...I can raw process an EOS-M file from my 6D.  And the 6D hit the market earlier with wi-fi + GPS and much of his goo-goo gaa-gaa should be directed only at Nikon, except Nikon also now has wi-fi with the D750 or D5300, etc.

I do think the A6000 is a very non-gimped product for the price however, but that does not mean Sony as a brand will not gimp things here and there in the future in the name of product differentiation.  Lets not forget the 3N with its 2.5 FPS when it is exceeding that FPS on pano shots...so it is not a mechanical limitation of the shutter or capture system.

In the end it looks like he is proposing a future Sony sponsorship like Gary Fong, and at the same time nothing better to rile up more viewership.  Tony Northrup got a lot more word of mouth and viewership for his D810 is the best camera in the world videos too.

His videos are fun and informative...but rather long and lacks sex appeal and humor.

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PVCdroid
PVCdroid Veteran Member • Posts: 4,383
Re: Yes I would.......
2

DFPanno wrote:

nevercat wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

gkstar wrote:

Probably not that well ballanced but a lot of truth. This is a good way to break the stereotypes out there.

The lack of balance diminishes the persausiveness of his presentation.

The fact is that most pros cannot depend on mirror-less alone at this point.

I would never hire someone whose intent was to shoot my daughter's wedding solely with a Sony A7S (by way of example).

Bet he will rent a DSLR when he needs it.

Do you realy look at the gear a person is using and not at his portfolio. When I would hire a photograph I don't care with what camera he shoots, as long as the results are great. I don't know his work, so I don't know if I would hire him, but I will never let that depend on the gear he is using. When he makes beautifull pictures with a LOMO camera then that is what he use and he can get the job, when he takes very bad pictures with the latest hasselblad...

(don't get me wrong, I don't think that it is possible to take great pictures with a Lomo camera, but when someone succeed in that I will hire him over someone without good pictures)

I am too knowledgeable and experienced with photography not to look at the photographer's' gear.

I own and operate all formats and I know the limits of each category of equipment.

You want to shoot my daughter's wedding with just a mirror-less camera? Buh-bye.

My opinion will probably change in a generation or two but that's where I am as of today.

How dramatic. Maybe she will elope and you won't have to worry about it. I would welcome anyone with a FF mirrorless based on what the sensor delivers and the photographer's reputation. You've got Canon users that are picking up A7 series cameras left and right and not just for landscape.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3734816

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DFPanno
DFPanno Veteran Member • Posts: 5,502
I suggest you look at my gear list…….
2

PVCdroid wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

nevercat wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

gkstar wrote:

Probably not that well ballanced but a lot of truth. This is a good way to break the stereotypes out there.

The lack of balance diminishes the persausiveness of his presentation.

The fact is that most pros cannot depend on mirror-less alone at this point.

I would never hire someone whose intent was to shoot my daughter's wedding solely with a Sony A7S (by way of example).

Bet he will rent a DSLR when he needs it.

Do you realy look at the gear a person is using and not at his portfolio. When I would hire a photograph I don't care with what camera he shoots, as long as the results are great. I don't know his work, so I don't know if I would hire him, but I will never let that depend on the gear he is using. When he makes beautifull pictures with a LOMO camera then that is what he use and he can get the job, when he takes very bad pictures with the latest hasselblad...

(don't get me wrong, I don't think that it is possible to take great pictures with a Lomo camera, but when someone succeed in that I will hire him over someone without good pictures)

I am too knowledgeable and experienced with photography not to look at the photographer's' gear.

I own and operate all formats and I know the limits of each category of equipment.

You want to shoot my daughter's wedding with just a mirror-less camera? Buh-bye.

My opinion will probably change in a generation or two but that's where I am as of today.

How dramatic. Maybe she will elope and you won't have to worry about it. I would welcome anyone with a FF mirrorless based on what the sensor delivers and the photographer's reputation. You've got Canon users that are picking up A7 series cameras left and right and not just for landscape.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3734816

I am the last guy on the forum that you should be lecturing on Canon vs. Sony.

My opinions are not based on what somebody on DPR wrote one day.  I actually use that gear to reasonably good effect (link to my images are in my sig).

As a 12 year Canon digital shooter I can assure you we are not buying Sonys for their AF…..

In fact many of us maintain both systems because they are not redundent.

Your certainly welcome to contract whoever you see fit…….

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DFPanno
DFPanno Veteran Member • Posts: 5,502
Incidently..

PVCdroid wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

nevercat wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

gkstar wrote:

Probably not that well ballanced but a lot of truth. This is a good way to break the stereotypes out there.

The lack of balance diminishes the persausiveness of his presentation.

The fact is that most pros cannot depend on mirror-less alone at this point.

I would never hire someone whose intent was to shoot my daughter's wedding solely with a Sony A7S (by way of example).

Bet he will rent a DSLR when he needs it.

Do you realy look at the gear a person is using and not at his portfolio. When I would hire a photograph I don't care with what camera he shoots, as long as the results are great. I don't know his work, so I don't know if I would hire him, but I will never let that depend on the gear he is using. When he makes beautifull pictures with a LOMO camera then that is what he use and he can get the job, when he takes very bad pictures with the latest hasselblad...

(don't get me wrong, I don't think that it is possible to take great pictures with a Lomo camera, but when someone succeed in that I will hire him over someone without good pictures)

I am too knowledgeable and experienced with photography not to look at the photographer's' gear.

I own and operate all formats and I know the limits of each category of equipment.

You want to shoot my daughter's wedding with just a mirror-less camera? Buh-bye.

My opinion will probably change in a generation or two but that's where I am as of today.

How dramatic. Maybe she will elope and you won't have to worry about it. I would welcome anyone with a FF mirrorless based on what the sensor delivers and the photographer's reputation. You've got Canon users that are picking up A7 series cameras left and right and not just for landscape.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3734816

I read the thread you referenced and the entire discussion revolves around landscape and astro-photography.  Both are types of static imaging in which the Alphas excel…….

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sean lancaster
sean lancaster Veteran Member • Posts: 7,365
Re: Yes I would.......
2

PVCdroid wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

nevercat wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

gkstar wrote:

Probably not that well ballanced but a lot of truth. This is a good way to break the stereotypes out there.

The lack of balance diminishes the persausiveness of his presentation.

The fact is that most pros cannot depend on mirror-less alone at this point.

I would never hire someone whose intent was to shoot my daughter's wedding solely with a Sony A7S (by way of example).

Bet he will rent a DSLR when he needs it.

Do you realy look at the gear a person is using and not at his portfolio. When I would hire a photograph I don't care with what camera he shoots, as long as the results are great. I don't know his work, so I don't know if I would hire him, but I will never let that depend on the gear he is using. When he makes beautifull pictures with a LOMO camera then that is what he use and he can get the job, when he takes very bad pictures with the latest hasselblad...

(don't get me wrong, I don't think that it is possible to take great pictures with a Lomo camera, but when someone succeed in that I will hire him over someone without good pictures)

I am too knowledgeable and experienced with photography not to look at the photographer's' gear.

I own and operate all formats and I know the limits of each category of equipment.

You want to shoot my daughter's wedding with just a mirror-less camera? Buh-bye.

My opinion will probably change in a generation or two but that's where I am as of today.

How dramatic. Maybe she will elope and you won't have to worry about it. I would welcome anyone with a FF mirrorless based on what the sensor delivers and the photographer's reputation. You've got Canon users that are picking up A7 series cameras left and right and not just for landscape.

To be fair, I left Canon for my A7. But I first tried an RX1 and the speed it took to acquire AF for me (as an available light shooter) was enough that I didn't commit to the RX1. I then tried the A7r for a week (rental) and I barely saw improvements over the RX1 AF abilities. It wasn't until the A7 that I found the AF speed to be acceptable (in less than stellar light). But it's still quite a ways behind the Canon 6D I was shooting. But since I shoot for myself and have no clients, I was comfortable making the shift. Reportedly the A6000 and A7s are both pretty decent improvements. I'd love to have a decent improvement over my A7 because it's still having moments of disappointing me.

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pixelpushing
pixelpushing Veteran Member • Posts: 3,229
Re: My problem with this video.....
3

DFPanno wrote:

narenek wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

gkstar wrote:

Probably not that well ballanced but a lot of truth. This is a good way to break the stereotypes out there.

The lack of balance diminishes the persausiveness of his presentation.

The fact is that most pros cannot depend on mirror-less alone at this point.

I would never hire someone whose intent was to shoot my daughter's wedding solely with a Sony A7S (by way of example).

Bet he will rent a DSLR when he needs it.

Of course it's not balanced. He's giving the reasons he changed not making a comparison between the systems, the reasons will always be in favour of the Sony because otherwise he wouldn't have made the choice to change.

Is that he makes it sound as though Sony has it "all over" Canikon when the truth is that it doesn't and any real pro will almost inevitably turn to their products for items that Sony does not currently sell.

I agree. A mirrorless currently is not a DSLR, especially not a pro DSLR, in terms of raw speed and flexibility. Yes, OVFs are less than ideal. Yes, mirrorless has a great size-price-performance balance. That doesn't mean 1D folks are throwing out tens of thousands of bucks of their gear to get the smaller, lighter, enthusiast grade gear - because the two are not synonymous.

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PVCdroid
PVCdroid Veteran Member • Posts: 4,383
Re: Incidently..
2

DFPanno wrote:

PVCdroid wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

nevercat wrote:

DFPanno wrote:

gkstar wrote:

Probably not that well ballanced but a lot of truth. This is a good way to break the stereotypes out there.

The lack of balance diminishes the persausiveness of his presentation.

The fact is that most pros cannot depend on mirror-less alone at this point.

I would never hire someone whose intent was to shoot my daughter's wedding solely with a Sony A7S (by way of example).

Bet he will rent a DSLR when he needs it.

Do you realy look at the gear a person is using and not at his portfolio. When I would hire a photograph I don't care with what camera he shoots, as long as the results are great. I don't know his work, so I don't know if I would hire him, but I will never let that depend on the gear he is using. When he makes beautifull pictures with a LOMO camera then that is what he use and he can get the job, when he takes very bad pictures with the latest hasselblad...

(don't get me wrong, I don't think that it is possible to take great pictures with a Lomo camera, but when someone succeed in that I will hire him over someone without good pictures)

I am too knowledgeable and experienced with photography not to look at the photographer's' gear.

I own and operate all formats and I know the limits of each category of equipment.

You want to shoot my daughter's wedding with just a mirror-less camera? Buh-bye.

My opinion will probably change in a generation or two but that's where I am as of today.

How dramatic. Maybe she will elope and you won't have to worry about it. I would welcome anyone with a FF mirrorless based on what the sensor delivers and the photographer's reputation. You've got Canon users that are picking up A7 series cameras left and right and not just for landscape.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3734816

I read the thread you referenced and the entire discussion revolves around landscape and astro-photography. Both are types of static imaging in which the Alphas excel…….

Wouldn't someone shooting medium format have a slower shooting experience as well? Those are popular cameras for pros at weddings. I've seen different styles of pros working weddings. Some will spray and pray and others will be more deliberate in their shooting style. I'm not saying mirrorless has the speed of DSLR, I 'm saying the end product can be as good or better.

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Lenscraft
Lenscraft Forum Member • Posts: 88
Re: IMO.......
1

DFPanno wrote:

Bet he will rent a DSLR when he needs it.

Yes, but what is wrong with that?

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