Does your lens cap still work when using a filter?

Started Sep 25, 2014 | Discussions
rcf123 Junior Member • Posts: 28
Does your lens cap still work when using a filter?

My question is essentially that...I have never used filters before, so I have no idea, but I wanted to give it a go..

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0083WYD9Q/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1WFSHX6J483SX

So, if I buy the above filter kit (I have a fuji xt1), does the lens cap that comes with the lens still fit onto it? How about the hood?

I apologize if this is a dumb question!! 

Ido Scharf
Ido Scharf Veteran Member • Posts: 5,181
Re: Does your lens cap still work when using a filter?
2

Yup, it works for me and should work in all cases. Remember that a polarizer rotates, so the cap will rotate with it when it's on; just a minor annoyance, not much else.

Those filters look awful, though. For decent quality, you should be spending more than that on each filter!

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OP rcf123 Junior Member • Posts: 28
Re: Does your lens cap still work when using a filter?

Ido S wrote:

Yup, it works for me and should work in all cases. Remember that a polarizer rotates, so the cap will rotate with it when it's on; just a minor annoyance, not much else.

Those filters look awful, though. For decent quality, you should be spending more than that on each filter!

As I'm just beginning to dabble into the world of filters, I didn't want to spend a fortune before knowing which filter type I prefer..I was honestly surprised by the high ratings for them though!! 

Ido Scharf
Ido Scharf Veteran Member • Posts: 5,181
Re: Does your lens cap still work when using a filter?
2

rcf123 wrote:

As I'm just beginning to dabble into the world of filters, I didn't want to spend a fortune before knowing whichfilter type I prefer..I was honestly surprised by the high ratings for them though!!

That's quite a bad reason for buying bad filters, in my opinion.

Please do share what you want to achieve with a filter that you can't without one, or can't do so as effectively, and in what type of light, and I'll do my best to assist you. I'm sure some others will chime in, too.

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Chris R-UK Forum Pro • Posts: 22,292
Re: Does your lens cap still work when using a filter?

rcf123 wrote:

As I'm just beginning to dabble into the world of filters, I didn't want to spend a fortune before knowing whichfilter type I prefer..I was honestly surprised by the high ratings for them though!!

ND filters and polarizing filters solve particular problems.  It isn't a question of preferring one filter over another, it's a question of using the filter that solves the problem that you have.  Only buy a filter when you have a problem that needs one and expect to pay 5x more than this pack costs.

UV filters don't have any effect on images except to make them worse, especially at this price point.  Some people use UV filters for protection especially in conditions like blowing sand and heavy water spray, but you need to pay quite a lot to get a filter that won't have detrimental effect on your images.

You can use lens caps with filters, but you would normally only out an ND filter or a polarizing filter on your camera for a particular series of shots and then take the filter off the lens.  In other words, with these kind of filters you don't often have both the lens and the lens cap on at the same time.

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Chris R

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tedolf
tedolf Forum Pro • Posts: 28,804
For the price of this kit....
1

Ido S wrote:

rcf123 wrote:

As I'm just beginning to dabble into the world of filters, I didn't want to spend a fortune before knowing whichfilter type I prefer..I was honestly surprised by the high ratings for them though!!

That's quite a bad reason for buying bad filters, in my opinion.

Please do share what you want to achieve with a filter that you can't without one, or can't do so as effectively, and in what type of light, and I'll do my best to assist you. I'm sure some others will chime in, too.

and a little more you could buy one decent polarizer.   That is probably the only filter you need anyway.  The UV filter does nothing on a digital camera.  The weak ND filter you probably won't need as the polarizer is inherently an ND filter anyway.

Tedolph

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scorrpio
scorrpio Veteran Member • Posts: 3,595
Re: Does your lens cap still work when using a filter?

Typically, a filter has in front the same diameter thread as one it is designed for.    As most caps hook into the filter thread, cap should attach to filter just fine.   There are, however, slim filters designed to work with ultrawide lenses without causing vigneting - these filters have no thread in front.   With those filters, you typically need a cap that slips over the lens.  Some slim filters (i.e. B+W) actually come bundled with one.   Of course, a slim B+W polarizer costs 4x the set you linked.

Skip the UV.   useless.

A several stop ND is good for low shutter speed tripod work - i.e. 'creamy water'.   Other uses too.

A polarizer is generally good to have for outdoors as it can cut out glare and unwanted reflections.

OP rcf123 Junior Member • Posts: 28
Re: For the price of this kit....

tedolf wrote:

Ido S wrote:

rcf123 wrote:

As I'm just beginning to dabble into the world of filters, I didn't want to spend a fortune before knowing whichfilter type I prefer..I was honestly surprised by the high ratings for them though!!

That's quite a bad reason for buying bad filters, in my opinion.

Please do share what you want to achieve with a filter that you can't without one, or can't do so as effectively, and in what type of light, and I'll do my best to assist you. I'm sure some others will chime in, too.

and a little more you could buy one decent polarizer. That is probably the only filter you need anyway. The UV filter does nothing on a digital camera. The weak ND filter you probably won't need as the polarizer is inherently an ND filter anyway.

Tedolph

http://www.amazon.com/Tiffen-Circular-Polarizer-Glass-Filter/dp/B00007LA0T/ref=cm_cmu_pg__header

Is this one any better?? Reviews are better...well, there are more reviews. Same rating.

Honestly, my friend dropped her camera once and cracked her lens...I've never dropped any camera while using it, so I can't really foresee that happening now, but it's better to be safe than sorry!! I've read others dropping their camera with a filter on and it seems to just crack the filter and keep the lens in a good condition.

So, principally protection (in this case I'm told to go with a UV, as it doesn't have as great of an effect on the pictures taken).

However, I have seen the effects of using a polarizing filter, and I am thoroughly impressed.

I have 3 lenses and all 3 have different diameters, so I really prefer not to have to spend 50$ each for now!

Mystery member Forum Pro • Posts: 11,087
Re: For the price of this kit....
1

rcf123 wrote:

Honestly, my friend dropped her camera once and cracked her lens...I've never dropped any camera while using it, so I can't really foresee that happening now, but it's better to be safe than sorry!! I've read others dropping their camera with a filter on and it seems to just crack the filter and keep the lens in a good condition.

So, principally protection (in this case I'm told to go with a UV, as it doesn't have as great of an effect on the pictures taken).

However, I have seen the effects of using a polarizing filter, and I am thoroughly impressed.

I have 3 lenses and all 3 have different diameters, so I really prefer not to have to spend 50$ each for now!

People (me included) fit plain or UV filters mainly to keep dirt and sea spray off the precious surface of the lens. UV filtering used to be slightly relevant for film cameras, but is of no importance for digital cameras. Many filters come standard as "UV", mainly because it sounds better than "Plain Old Glass". I'd prefer to clean a filter rather than scrub away at the actual lens.

I don't think that a filter would offer much protection against the consequences of dropping a camera. A minor bump might ruin the threads and make it hard to remove the filter. You also need to be careful when fitting the filter that the threads don't become crossed; gently turning the filter in the "wrong" direction will help you locate the start of the thread. No need to over-tighten either.

Most filters have a front thread and grip the lens cap successfully. One of my after-market lens caps soon lost its grip, but those from Nikon, Sigma etc. seem to be made of sterner stuff.

This subject arouses lively discussion on the forum. I think a $50 filter is a good investment, and I've done plenty of tests to confirm that filters don't have a noticeable effect on image quality. I have a mixture of UV and plain, mostly ProMaster or Hoya brand.

leno Senior Member • Posts: 1,257
Re: For the price of this kit....

WryCuda wrote:

rcf123 wrote:

Honestly, my friend dropped her camera once and cracked her lens...I've never dropped any camera while using it, so I can't really foresee that happening now, but it's better to be safe than sorry!! I've read others dropping their camera with a filter on and it seems to just crack the filter and keep the lens in a good condition.

So, principally protection (in this case I'm told to go with a UV, as it doesn't have as great of an effect on the pictures taken).

However, I have seen the effects of using a polarizing filter, and I am thoroughly impressed.

I have 3 lenses and all 3 have different diameters, so I really prefer not to have to spend 50$ each for now!

People (me included) fit plain or UV filters mainly to keep dirt and sea spray off the precious surface of the lens. UV filtering used to be slightly relevant for film cameras, but is of no importance for digital cameras. Many filters come standard as "UV", mainly because it sounds better than "Plain Old Glass". I'd prefer to clean a filter rather than scrub away at the actual lens.

I don't think that a filter would offer much protection against the consequences of dropping a camera. A minor bump might ruin the threads and make it hard to remove the filter.

It might not offer much but I have been glad of the little it has a couple of times. I know have one filer which has a dent and chip in it but its okay. Chip and dent would have been on the lens edge. The other was smashed completly but the lens survived. I was also a bit dented but healed over a short time. Keep them clean and buy resonable ones.

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Guidenet
Guidenet Forum Pro • Posts: 15,748
Filters and Beginners
2

rcf123 wrote:

My question is essentially that...I have never used filters before, so I have no idea, but I wanted to give it a go..

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0083WYD9Q/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1WFSHX6J483SX

Filters seem to be something beginners think they need to get into and that's rarely so. If and when you decide you need a specific effect which a polarizer or ND Grad might give, then go out and buy it. Moreover, don't buy a cheap one like the ones you seem to be looking at.

For example, in 52mm thread, this would be the polarizer I'd invest in and no poorer. I really only consider B+W or Heliopan, no other brand. I'm not going to stick a cheap piece of glass in front of my expensive, well designed lenses. If you need a particular filter, the investment should be considered the same way you might consider the investment in a high quality lens purchase.

http://www.adorama.com/BW52XSPKCPN.html

Better to spend your time and money learning good composition and the craft of photography than to be willy nilly poking cheap filters on your glass. Only consider a filter if you know a specific effect you want in a picture and know a filter which will give that specific effect. Then and only then make the investment.

Consider spending your time on learning. Here's a great tutorial to start you off if you're serious:

Beyond the Rule of Thirds

Here's a good article by Thom Hogan on the use of filters:

Filters 101

Finally, forget using a filter for so called protection from anything. The idea that a tissue thin piece of glass is going to protect a hardened front element or that pollutants can sneak around the sealed edges of a front element are a bit silly. The idea that the broken shards of glass from a shattered UV filter scratching up a front element are very real. Try cleaning that up safely and without marring the lens coating.

Take care and have fun.

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Cheers, Craig
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Mark B.
Mark B. Forum Pro • Posts: 29,252
Re: Does your lens cap still work when using a filter?

rcf123 wrote:

My question is essentially that...I have never used filters before, so I have no idea, but I wanted to give it a go..

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0083WYD9Q/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1WFSHX6J483SX

So, if I buy the above filter kit (I have a fuji xt1), does the lens cap that comes with the lens still fit onto it? How about the hood?

I apologize if this is a dumb question!!

Cheap filters will result in image quality being adversely affected.

If you're looking for lens protection, spend money on the correct lens hood instead.  There are dozens of threads debating the pros & cons of protective filters, but the fact is that for the majority of people a lens hood provides all the protection you'll need.  It will also greatly reduce the chances of lens flare.  These cheap filters will increase chances of flare.

For effects like polarizer filters & ND, spend money on name brand filters (B+W, Hoya, etc.).

BTW, unless you get 'slim' filters which do not have threads in front of them, yes you can use the lens cap.  Personally I only attach a filter for specific effects, so once I'm done it comes right back off - which means I'm putting the cap on the bare lens.

Mark

Mark B.
Mark B. Forum Pro • Posts: 29,252
Re: For the price of this kit....

rcf123 wrote:

tedolf wrote:

Ido S wrote:

rcf123 wrote:

As I'm just beginning to dabble into the world of filters, I didn't want to spend a fortune before knowing whichfilter type I prefer..I was honestly surprised by the high ratings for them though!!

That's quite a bad reason for buying bad filters, in my opinion.

Please do share what you want to achieve with a filter that you can't without one, or can't do so as effectively, and in what type of light, and I'll do my best to assist you. I'm sure some others will chime in, too.

and a little more you could buy one decent polarizer. That is probably the only filter you need anyway. The UV filter does nothing on a digital camera. The weak ND filter you probably won't need as the polarizer is inherently an ND filter anyway.

Tedolph

http://www.amazon.com/Tiffen-Circular-Polarizer-Glass-Filter/dp/B00007LA0T/ref=cm_cmu_pg__header

Is this one any better?? Reviews are better...well, there are more reviews. Same rating.

Honestly, my friend dropped her camera once and cracked her lens...I've never dropped any camera while using it, so I can't really foresee that happening now, but it's better to be safe than sorry!! I've read others dropping their camera with a filter on and it seems to just crack the filter and keep the lens in a good condition.

Keep the lens hood attached whenever the camera is out.  I dropped a camera lens first, and the lens hood absorbed the impact.  No damage to lens or camera and I kept shooting.  With a filter only, chances are excellent it would have 1) cracked and 2) jammed onto the threads thus ending your day of shooting until you either wrench the smashed filter off of the lens, or send the lens to a repair shop.

So, principally protection (in this case I'm told to go with a UV, as it doesn't have as great of an effect on the pictures taken).

Polarizers are not for protection.  They are used for specific effects - enhancing color & contrast in the sky & foliage, or for reducing/eliminating reflections.

However, I have seen the effects of using a polarizing filter, and I am thoroughly impressed.

I have 3 lenses and all 3 have different diameters, so I really prefer not to have to spend 50$ each for now!

The Tiffen is only marginally better than the no-name filters in your original post.  Maybe just get one polarizer for your most often used lens.  Per my earlier reply, get a lens hood for every lens - the proper shape & size for the lens, not generic hoods.

Mark

Ido Scharf
Ido Scharf Veteran Member • Posts: 5,181
Re: For the price of this kit....

rcf123 wrote:

http://www.amazon.com/Tiffen-Circular-Polarizer-Glass-Filter/dp/B00007LA0T/ref=cm_cmu_pg__header

Is this one any better?? Reviews are better...well, there are more reviews. Same rating.

Yes, it absolutely is better. I have one, in 52mm thread size, and it's great (for the price, at least). I haven't had any qualms with it, though admittedly I haven't printed any photo taken using the filter.

Honestly, my friend dropped her camera once and cracked her lens...I've never dropped any camera while using it, so I can't really foresee that happening now, but it's better to be safe than sorry!! I've read others dropping their camera with a filter on and it seems to just crack the filter and keep the lens in a good condition.

If one drops his/her camera, then its ergonomics are probably so poor they never should've bought it in the first place. A camera needs to have a firm grip, and that's very individual from one person to the other. I feel like the E-M5's rather shallow grip is secure enough in my hand, but I'm sure that people with large hands will have a much harder time holding it.

So, principally protection (in this case I'm told to go with a UV, as it doesn't have as great of an effect on the pictures taken).

If the filter breaks, there is a risk of it crashing onto the front element and breaking it, too. And if the camera/lens falls, stuff will go wrong regardless.

Lens hoods are great alternatives. If a hood wasn't supplied with your lens, get one (even a cheap third-party one off eBay). Along with actually being useful for blocking stray light, it also offers a "first line of defense"-type protection; if the lens bumps into something at its front, the hood will take the beating.

However, I have seen the effects of using a polarizing filter, and I am thoroughly impressed.

I have 3 lenses and all 3 have different diameters, so I really prefer not to have to spend 50$ each for now!

You don't need to buy a separate filter for each lens - you can simply buy cheap step-up rings. Get a filter for the biggest lens (in thread diameter) you have, and buy a step-up ring for each of your other lenses. For example, if your big lens has a 58mm thread and your smaller lens has a 52mm thread, get a 52-58mm step-up ring.

If your smaller lens is a wide-angle (say, 24mm equiv. or shorter) and has a thread significantly smaller than the bigger lens (for example, 52mm and 77mm, respectively), there is a risk of vignetting. In such case, it would be best to get an appropriately-sized filter. In general, it's best to have appropriately-sized filters for wide-angle lenses - even better would be slim filters, especially for ultra-wide lenses (18mm equiv. or shorter).

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Leonard Migliore
Leonard Migliore Forum Pro • Posts: 18,691
Re: Does your lens cap still work when using a filter?
1

rcf123 wrote:

My question is essentially that...I have never used filters before, so I have no idea, but I wanted to give it a go..

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0083WYD9Q/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1WFSHX6J483SX

So, if I buy the above filter kit (I have a fuji xt1), does the lens cap that comes with the lens still fit onto it? How about the hood?

I apologize if this is a dumb question!!

I can think of an even dumber question:

Does my filter still work when I'm using my lens cap?

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Leonard Migliore

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tedolf
tedolf Forum Pro • Posts: 28,804
Re: For the price of this kit....
1

rcf123 wrote:

tedolf wrote:

Ido S wrote:

rcf123 wrote:

As I'm just beginning to dabble into the world of filters, I didn't want to spend a fortune before knowing whichfilter type I prefer..I was honestly surprised by the high ratings for them though!!

That's quite a bad reason for buying bad filters, in my opinion.

Please do share what you want to achieve with a filter that you can't without one, or can't do so as effectively, and in what type of light, and I'll do my best to assist you. I'm sure some others will chime in, too.

and a little more you could buy one decent polarizer. That is probably the only filter you need anyway. The UV filter does nothing on a digital camera. The weak ND filter you probably won't need as the polarizer is inherently an ND filter anyway.

Tedolph

http://www.amazon.com/Tiffen-Circular-Polarizer-Glass-Filter/dp/B00007LA0T/ref=cm_cmu_pg__header

Is this one any better?

yes.

Reviews are better...well, there are more reviews. Same rating.

Honestly, my friend dropped her camera once and cracked her lens...I've never dropped any camera while using it, so I can't really foresee that happening now, but it's better to be safe than sorry!! I've read others dropping their camera with a filter on and it seems to just crack the filter and keep the lens in a good condition.

Mostly those are old wives' tales.  I have been carrying a camera around for 40 years and I never "cracked a lens" even though I have dropped, toppled over, etc. my camera more than once.  I do tend to use a hood though.   Also, I don't personally know anyone who "cracked a lens".    I wouldn't worry about it.  If you are, just use a hood.  The $5.00 rubber ones work fine.

So, principally protection (in this case I'm told to go with a UV, as it doesn't have as great of an effect on the pictures taken).

It is a waste.  It can degrade the image.  It doesn't achieve anything that a hood can't do better while actually improving the image.

However, I have seen the effects of using a polarizing filter, and I am thoroughly impressed.

so is everybody else.

I have 3 lenses and all 3 have different diameters, so I really prefer not to have to spend 50$ each for now!

Don't.  Just buy the filter for the largest lens, and get step up rings for the other two (about $5.00 each).

Tedolph

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sadatoni Contributing Member • Posts: 787
Re: For the price of this kit....

I have the 62mm version of this CP, and I love it.

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sadatoni Contributing Member • Posts: 787
Re: For the price of this kit....

I once had a UV filter save a lens when I dropped it.  It cracked the filter glass, but the lens was ok.

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Guidenet
Guidenet Forum Pro • Posts: 15,748
Re: For the price of this kit....
2

sadatoni wrote:

I once had a UV filter save a lens when I dropped it. It cracked the filter glass, but the lens was ok.

I'm not going to get into a big argument, but I'm just curious. How do you know that the breaking of the UV filter kept the lens safe? It seems to me that a tissue thin piece of glass easily breaks and would break whether or not the lens would or not. Moreover, if a lens fell hard enough to be worried about breaking the nose element, chances are there are glass elements inside which are now out of line or off center. I would never trust a dropped lens without it first going into a repair center for a checkup. That's not cheap.

As an experiment, call Canon, Nikon or Sony customer support and tell them your lens is not sharp or hazy. I'll bet you dollars to donuts the first thing they will ask is whether you're using a protective filter and if you say yes, they will tell you to remove it and call them back if it's not fixed. Try it.

Finally, I think most of the stories you hear of a filter actually protecting a lens are made up to justify the person using them so many years. People don't like to look stupid.

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Chuck Lantz Veteran Member • Posts: 4,332
Re: For the price of this kit....

You should always use a filter on a lens. All good lenses are coated, and even premium coatings can be degraded by even careful cleaning or just being exposed to air, which is usually polluted, often with substances with acidic properties.

Besides all that, even a minor bump can result in a scratch on the primary lens if not protected with at least a UV or Haze filter. The quality of even inexpensive filters has increased greatly since the film days, so I'd suggest buying that $12 set and try them out.

Do some testing with the UV filter on and off to see if you lose any detail. If you don't, then you've just made a helluva deal. If not, you're out 12 bucks, and you still get a cleaning cloth.

As someone else wrote, be very careful installing the filters. There are dozens of horror stories involving stuck filters that require "major surgery" to remove without busting the lens.

By the way, I'm giving five gold stars to whoever suggested turning the filter the "wrong" way to get the threads started. That's an old trick fire-fighters use when screwing-on fire hoses and nozzles. This is the first time I've seen that trick mentioned in years, since way back when I was a Boy Scout, and it was taught to me by a fire station Captain.

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