RX100 III - overexposed images?

Started Aug 7, 2014 | Discussions
lubej Regular Member • Posts: 224
RX100 III - overexposed images?

Hello

Do you find out that images you take are overexposed, skies are blown out ...

Is it possible that sony produced high end (and quite expensive) camera which matering works incorrectly?

If the answer is yes, do you think there is any chance that we will see firmware update which will fix this problem?

I'm not an expert but I think that changing default settings to correct this problem is wrong approach.Pictures should be fine with default settings!

For example, check out my album:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gregorv/sets/72157645896739253/

For all pictures camera was set to iAuto mode.

Thank you.

Kind regards

Sony RX100 III
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
Interceptor121 Regular Member • Posts: 372
Re: RX100 III - overexposed images?

I had the same issue on the Mark III I returned not sure if it is a general problem or a specific item issue

I found that the metering was -2/3 higher than my Nikon and the other RX100 II I have

Symptoms included clipped highlights as those in your images there is a similar post in this forum already today

-- hide signature --
 Interceptor121's gear list:Interceptor121's gear list
Sony RX100 II Nikon D7100 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG Macro HSM II +10 more
Javier Romero Junior Member • Posts: 30
Re: RX100 III - overexposed images?
1

Jesus, Another issue with this camera, mine has a terrible auto focus issue, inconsistent white balance and I 've been having a hard time dealing with this overexposed images problem, so annoying, I feel I just wasted almost $900!

lancespring Veteran Member • Posts: 3,974
This same issue exists with many other Sony cameras
1

lubej wrote:

Hello

Do you find out that images you take are overexposed, skies are blown out ...

Is it possible that sony produced high end (and quite expensive) camera which matering works incorrectly?

If the answer is yes, do you think there is any chance that we will see firmware update which will fix this problem?

I'm not an expert but I think that changing default settings to correct this problem is wrong approach.Pictures should be fine with default settings!

For example, check out my album:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gregorv/sets/72157645896739253/

For all pictures camera was set to iAuto mode.

that use a 1 inch sensor. I have to use exposure compensation when using both my Sony RX10 and AX100. If I do not, the exposure is usually overexposed.

I always set exposure compensation to at least a minimum of -.3 In direct sunlight, you will often need to use -.7

Skies being blown out is a common photography problem that has always existed. You can eliminate that problem when shooting in bright conditions by simply using a polarizing filter on your camera.

Photographers have been using polarizing filters for 75 years, ever since their invention by Edwin Land.  It is a most useful tool that ever good photographer should own.

.

 lancespring's gear list:lancespring's gear list
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Nikon D600 +1 more
Javier Romero Junior Member • Posts: 30
Re: This same issue exists with many other Sony cameras

lancespring wrote:

lubej wrote:

Hello

Do you find out that images you take are overexposed, skies are blown out ...

Is it possible that sony produced high end (and quite expensive) camera which matering works incorrectly?

If the answer is yes, do you think there is any chance that we will see firmware update which will fix this problem?

I'm not an expert but I think that changing default settings to correct this problem is wrong approach.Pictures should be fine with default settings!

For example, check out my album:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gregorv/sets/72157645896739253/

For all pictures camera was set to iAuto mode.

that use a 1 inch sensor. I have to use exposure compensation when using both my Sony RX10 and AX100. If I do not, the exposure is usually overexposed.

I always set exposure compensation to at least a minimum of -.3 In direct sunlight, you will often need to use -.7

Skies being blown out is a common photography problem that has always existed. You can eliminate that problem when shooting in bright conditions by simply using a polarizing filter on your camera.

Photographers have been using polarizing filters for 75 years, ever since their invention by Edwin Land. It is a most useful tool that ever good photographer should own.

.

Good point BUT in my case with the RX100m1 I never had issues like the overexpose and autofocusing issue, definitely  there's something wrong with these RX100m3.

DFPanno
DFPanno Veteran Member • Posts: 5,392
That is not what a polarizer is for........

lancespring wrote:

lubej wrote:

Hello

Do you find out that images you take are overexposed, skies are blown out ...

Is it possible that sony produced high end (and quite expensive) camera which matering works incorrectly?

If the answer is yes, do you think there is any chance that we will see firmware update which will fix this problem?

I'm not an expert but I think that changing default settings to correct this problem is wrong approach.Pictures should be fine with default settings!

For example, check out my album:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gregorv/sets/72157645896739253/

For all pictures camera was set to iAuto mode.

that use a 1 inch sensor. I have to use exposure compensation when using both my Sony RX10 and AX100. If I do not, the exposure is usually overexposed.

I always set exposure compensation to at least a minimum of -.3 In direct sunlight, you will often need to use -.7

Skies being blown out is a common photography problem that has always existed. You can eliminate that problem when shooting in bright conditions by simply using a polarizing filter on your camera.

Photographers have been using polarizing filters for 75 years, ever since their invention by Edwin Land. It is a most useful tool that ever good photographer should own.

You avoid blowing out bright elements by properly exposing for them.

No CP needed unless you have maxed out the camera's exposure parameters.

.

-- hide signature --

¡Viva la Resolución!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dfpanno/
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/dfpanno/popular-interesting/
On Flickriver chose "Scale to Fit Screen" (upper left) for highest resolution.

dan.carter Contributing Member • Posts: 584
Re: That is not what a polarizer is for........
1

A -0.3 to -0.7 for stills, and 0.0 to -0.3 for video has served me well. A polarizer will help, often a great deal, by balancing the overall exposure of exterior scenes. Especially in bright sun.

-- hide signature --

Sony RX10 & RX100M3
https://vimeo.com/user582748

elliottnewcomb Forum Pro • Posts: 14,208
Re: RX100 III - overexposed images?
1

Many use exposure cut a bit as their default. Don't forget the time of year (here anyway) is severe contrast, sky to image elements.

I had to cut my Oly Stylus 1 a lot today, bright skies against roof lines. Bright sidewalks, driveways, vegetation, etc.

-- hide signature --

Elliott

 elliottnewcomb's gear list:elliottnewcomb's gear list
Sony RX100 Olympus Stylus 1 Sony RX100 III Sony RX1R +1 more
Dimac Regular Member • Posts: 218
Re: That is not what a polarizer is for........

For Sony cameras (Rx100 series, Nex, A6000 ...)  I used to set -0.7 or -1.0.

The RX1 is the only Sony I need to set +

However, you can expose at the sky (AEL lock) to keep colour and clouds ... and use DR5 to brighten up the shadows (if shooting jpegs). Otherwise raw shadow post processing.

elliottnewcomb Forum Pro • Posts: 14,208
How to Get/Setup AEL Exposure Lock

Dimac wrote:

For Sony cameras (Rx100 series, Nex, A6000 ...) I used to set -0.7 or -1.0.

The RX1 is the only Sony I need to set +

However, you can expose at the sky (AEL lock) to keep colour and clouds ... and use DR5 to brighten up the shadows (if shooting jpegs). Otherwise raw shadow post processing.

AEL Exposure Lock, for rx100 m1 and m2 How to set it up explained here:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51991964

-- hide signature --

Elliott

 elliottnewcomb's gear list:elliottnewcomb's gear list
Sony RX100 Olympus Stylus 1 Sony RX100 III Sony RX1R +1 more
lancespring Veteran Member • Posts: 3,974
Totally misleading statement on your part
1

DFPanno wrote:

lancespring wrote:

lubej wrote:

Hello

Do you find out that images you take are overexposed, skies are blown out ...

Is it possible that sony produced high end (and quite expensive) camera which matering works incorrectly?

If the answer is yes, do you think there is any chance that we will see firmware update which will fix this problem?

I'm not an expert but I think that changing default settings to correct this problem is wrong approach.Pictures should be fine with default settings!

For example, check out my album:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gregorv/sets/72157645896739253/

For all pictures camera was set to iAuto mode.

that use a 1 inch sensor. I have to use exposure compensation when using both my Sony RX10 and AX100. If I do not, the exposure is usually overexposed.

I always set exposure compensation to at least a minimum of -.3 In direct sunlight, you will often need to use -.7

Skies being blown out is a common photography problem that has always existed. You can eliminate that problem when shooting in bright conditions by simply using a polarizing filter on your camera.

Photographers have been using polarizing filters for 75 years, ever since their invention by Edwin Land. It is a most useful tool that ever good photographer should own.

You avoid blowing out bright elements by properly exposing for them.

No CP needed unless you have maxed out the camera's exposure parameters.

Polarizers are typically used for dealing with blown out skies, sandy beaches, white concrete, and water. They help with anything non-metallic that is reflecting light intensely.

They are widely used by landscape photographers to improve their images. And if you take the time to look at his photos, that appears to be his primary interest in photography.

Recommending a CP to him is thus a perfectly valid and helpful recommendation. Every landscape photographer should own a polarizing filter.

So I disagree with you here 100%. You are wrong about whether he should look into using a CP with his camera.

.

 lancespring's gear list:lancespring's gear list
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Nikon D600 +1 more
(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 23,648
Re: This same issue exists with many other Sony cameras
1

Javier Romero wrote:

lancespring wrote:

lubej wrote:

Hello

Do you find out that images you take are overexposed, skies are blown out ...

Is it possible that sony produced high end (and quite expensive) camera which matering works incorrectly?

If the answer is yes, do you think there is any chance that we will see firmware update which will fix this problem?

I'm not an expert but I think that changing default settings to correct this problem is wrong approach.Pictures should be fine with default settings!

For example, check out my album:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gregorv/sets/72157645896739253/

For all pictures camera was set to iAuto mode.

that use a 1 inch sensor. I have to use exposure compensation when using both my Sony RX10 and AX100. If I do not, the exposure is usually overexposed.

I always set exposure compensation to at least a minimum of -.3 In direct sunlight, you will often need to use -.7

Skies being blown out is a common photography problem that has always existed. You can eliminate that problem when shooting in bright conditions by simply using a polarizing filter on your camera.

Photographers have been using polarizing filters for 75 years, ever since their invention by Edwin Land. It is a most useful tool that ever good photographer should own.

.

Good point BUT in my case with the RX100m1 I never had issues like the overexpose and autofocusing issue, definitely there's something wrong with these RX100m3.

Send it back for a check up or ask for a refund and look for a RX100m1, another option read the helpfull comments to make adjustments and see if it is working better for you that way.

expecting that a camera in auto mode makes the best choices possible has never worked with any point & shoot, i can shoot any of my points & shoots ( and i do own some ) the automodes never gave the results i'm looking for.

-- hide signature --

*All my Post Processing is done with Capture NX2*
Flickr Photo's
Galleries on DPR

edform
edform Senior Member • Posts: 4,649
Re: RX100 III - overexposed images?

lubej wrote:

Hello

Do you find out that images you take are overexposed, skies are blown out ...

Looking at your photosets, no! Some of your shots of mountain meadows against clouds in bright blue sky are absolutely great. The ones where the foreground is in shade and the sky is light as a consequence are par for the digital camera course - one was a barn in a garden, for example. Get a polarising filter to take the light-scatter out of your skies and you'd tame most of these extreme contrast scenes as well - way over 50% of all the light from a blue sky is scatter.

-- hide signature --

Ed Form

 edform's gear list:edform's gear list
Sony RX10 IV Nikon 1 V3 Nikon 1 Nikkor VR 6.7-13mm f/3.5-5.6 Nikon 1 Nikkor VR 10-100mm f/4.5-5.6 Nikon 1 Nikkor VR 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 +2 more
OP lubej Regular Member • Posts: 224
Re: This same issue exists with many other Sony cameras
1

Very interesting, so I'm not the only one with this problem.

I spent for this camera arround 1200 euros (camera + sony bag + 3 x batteries + battery charger + lcd protection, SDXC 64gb card ...) and now I have camera where I have to experiment with different setting to get good pictures.

I'm sorry, but this is not good. Sony should do a better job. They know they have bright lens, they implemented ND filter ..., I just don't understand why such basic thing is not ok.

Will sony fix this?

Do you maybe know how many days afer online purchase can I return the camera? I'm from EU.

Kind regards

(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 23,648
Re: This same issue exists with many other Sony cameras
2

lubej wrote:

Very interesting, so I'm not the only one with this problem.

I spent for this camera arround 1200 euros (camera + sony bag + 3 x batteries + battery charger + lcd protection ...) and now I have camera where I have to experiment with different setting to get good pictures.

I'm sorry, but this is not good. Sony should do a better job. They know they have bright lens, they implemented ND filter ..., I just don't understand why such basic thing is not ok.

Will sony fix this?

Do you maybe know how many days afer online purchase can I return the camera? I'm from EU.

Kind regards

I've been looking at your images on flickr, what do think is wrong with them ?, the images look fine to me.

regarding your return/refund option(s), i cant answer that one you need to check with the vendor you bought it from.

-- hide signature --

*All my Post Processing is done with Capture NX2*
Flickr Photo's
Galleries on DPR

Rick Evertsz
Rick Evertsz Regular Member • Posts: 295
Re: RX100 III - overexposed images?

I only quickly skimmed the first page, but they look fine to me, apart from the ones where you were shooting into the sun (e.g. DSC00038). I wouldn't want to reduce the exposure in that shot. It would have made the building too dark. I think the camera made a good choice.

In that situation, you might want to try the built in HDR feature. The camera takes a bunch of pics and then merges them in camera. You'll find that the sky comes out better, but without darkening other areas.

If you can be bothered, shoot RAW+JPEG. That'll let you recover some of the blown highlights. Don't think it would recover DSC00038 though. Personally, I'd be very happy with most of the shots you got.

 Rick Evertsz's gear list:Rick Evertsz's gear list
Sony Alpha a7 III Zeiss Batis 85mm F1.8 Sony FE 35mm F2.8 Sony FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 Sony FE 24-105mm F4 +1 more
Rick Evertsz
Rick Evertsz Regular Member • Posts: 295
Re: RX100 III - overexposed images?
3

Javier Romero wrote:

Jesus, Another issue with this camera, mine has a terrible auto focus issue, inconsistent white balance and I 've been having a hard time dealing with this overexposed images problem, so annoying, I feel I just wasted almost $900!

Javier. I'm really sorry the m3 isn't living up to your expectations. It has exceeded mine by a large margin (and I was delighted with the m1 I had for a couple years beforehand).

I haven't had an auto focus issue, nor an over exposure one. The m3 performs similarly to the m1 in that respect (for me at least). Of course, there are a few niggles. Skin smoothing when face detect is on for video was a complete shock (yesterday). Haven't recovered from that one yet!

I hope you can either exchange it for something you prefer, or at least you come to find that it's not as bad as you have initially found.

 Rick Evertsz's gear list:Rick Evertsz's gear list
Sony Alpha a7 III Zeiss Batis 85mm F1.8 Sony FE 35mm F2.8 Sony FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 Sony FE 24-105mm F4 +1 more
Indieke1 Contributing Member • Posts: 825
Re: RX100 III - overexposed images?

Rick Evertsz wrote:

I only quickly skimmed the first page, but they look fine to me, apart from the ones where you were shooting into the sun (e.g. DSC00038). I wouldn't want to reduce the exposure in that shot. It would have made the building too dark. I think the camera made a good choice.

In that situation, you might want to try the built in HDR feature. The camera takes a bunch of pics and then merges them in camera. You'll find that the sky comes out better, but without darkening other areas.

If you can be bothered, shoot RAW+JPEG. That'll let you recover some of the blown highlights. Don't think it would recover DSC00038 though. Personally, I'd be very happy with most of the shots you got.

Well I made other post about this problem. I would not be so happy with these shots either and understand his problem. Exactly what I have been experiencing.  The high contrast of the pics, make the problem worse.

What I DO understand also, that every manufacturer has to make a choice. Maybe here the results are not that good standard , in bright light, true. But then when you take a Pic in the shadow, things can be much better then with the one, that gave you a better shot before.

This shot is well pleasing, same settings as MY and probably yours, just P mode. Then this one would be underexposed, with many cameras.  So I  think all you have to do is find the setting that makes the best result for the kind  of pictures you like to take.  That is what I am doing before going to Thailand in 2 months.

Also I played around in very dark scenes. Different mode's. The Intelligent mode do a great job, considering the very little light, I was having at the time. I have no issues with the auto focus, think it is fast and good.

So I agree totally with you, that pictures are too aggressive, in Jpeg out of the box. Sure you not want to do PP, on every single picture.  I shoot normally Raw and Jpeg. and I prefer to underexpose some pictures, they are in most cases, easier to handle and get right.

So just find the settings that please u the  most and do what I do, take advantage of what the camera does right.

Rick Evertsz
Rick Evertsz Regular Member • Posts: 295
Re: RX100 III - overexposed images?
1

I have no time this weekend, but maybe next weekend I'll run some tests with the m1 and m3 shooting at the same time from almost the same vantage point (see rig below). I'd use my thumbs to trigger both shutters at the same time.

I suppose I'd set both cameras on Intelligent Auto, f2.8 at 35mm (above that, the m1 can't open up to f2.8). I think Auto would be a good baseline because it seems that the people having problems are mostly point-and-shooters who don't assert much manual control over the camera. I do not mean to impugn those of you who do otherwise.

Would also shoot some m1 AVCHD vs m3 XAVC-S video comparisons. It would be interesting to set the shutter speed to something low for stills too, to confirm/deny that the m3 has better stabilisation. Some subject against bright sky shots and some efforts to track my 18mth-old son running around would also be interesting.

Sorry. Handheld iPhone pic in dim light.

I bought this little grip so that I could film with the A7s and Rx100m3 at the same time. RX100m3 on 24mm and the A7s using the FE55. I'd concentrate on the A7s' monitor and leave the RX100m3 to take care of the wide view in case I needed it. I don't have a specific application for this setup, but thought it would be interesting to try out!

Any thoughts on what would be good to test? If I actually get around to this, I'll start a new thread. I fear I am about to make a rod for my own back

 Rick Evertsz's gear list:Rick Evertsz's gear list
Sony Alpha a7 III Zeiss Batis 85mm F1.8 Sony FE 35mm F2.8 Sony FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 Sony FE 24-105mm F4 +1 more
Ed at Ridersite Forum Pro • Posts: 18,427
Re: RX100 III - overexposed images?

The photos don't look that bad to me.  However, with my RX-100M2, I usually set the exposure comp to -0.3 or -0.7 when shooting in bright conditions, then recover shadows & make corrections in Lightroom.

What metering mode are you using?  Multi will likely work best for outdoor scenes.  And, with high contrast situations, a touch of DRO will possibly help.  Regardless, good post processing will always improve an image OOC.

-- hide signature --

AEH
http://aehass.zenfolio.com/
http://aehass.zenfolio.com/blog
Question: What do you do all week?
Answer: Mon to Fri. Nothing, Sat & Sun I rest!

 Ed at Ridersite's gear list:Ed at Ridersite's gear list
Sony RX100 II Sony SLT-A68 Sony DT 16-50mm F2.8 SSM Sony 70-400mm F4-5.6 G SSM II
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads