Polarizer for indoor real estate photography?

Started Jul 14, 2014 | Discussions
intheswim
intheswim Junior Member • Posts: 31
Polarizer for indoor real estate photography?
1

any comments on circular polarizers for indoor real estate photography?

I had a c polarizer on for the shot below by accident, then i took it off and took the shot again at a lower iso b/c it was hand held.  later when reviewing the shots i noticed the one with the polarizer showed less reflections in the room.  So then I thought to ask in the forums if it's common to use it improve indoor real estate photography.

 intheswim's gear list:intheswim's gear list
Fujifilm X-T1 Fujifilm XF 60mm F2.4 R Macro Fujifilm XF 14mm F2.8 R Fujifilm XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS Fujifilm XF 23mm F1.4 R
ryan2007 Forum Pro • Posts: 12,001
Re: Polarizer for indoor real estate photography?

Never use a polarizer indoors unless you have a specific need to control reflections. It is mainly used for a special effect and then removed after the shot is taken.

You automatically loose 2 stops of light when you do not need to.

It depends what you are photographing. You are better using a Mono-pod or Tripod with external flash or strobes. Add a cable release to remove all possibility of vibration of the camera by pressing the shutter button.

I recently shot interiors to help the owners sell their house because the real estate agent did a lousy job. generally speaking you can't just turn the camera on and shoot. You have to look an angles and perspective and what the final result should be ahead of time. This is a one shot deal with no possibility for re-shoots and it does not look professional if you have to ask for re-shoots, so again its a CYA thing.

SO, filters can be used indoors to correct color temperature if needed. I turn off all room lights and shoot with diffused or bounced off ceiling flash when needed, wide angle lens stopped down as much as possible. ISO should average 400 inside just like your shooting film and not digital.

This is what I would do, but if it works it works. You should control the background by manipulating the shutter speed, is what I do.

Mirfak Senior Member • Posts: 1,375
Re: Polarizer for indoor real estate photography?

intheswim wrote:

any comments on circular polarizers for indoor real estate photography?

I had a c polarizer on for the shot below by accident, then i took it off and took the shot again at a lower iso b/c it was hand held. later when reviewing the shots i noticed the one with the polarizer showed less reflections in the room. So then I thought to ask in the forums if it's common to use it improve indoor real estate photography.

The only reason why the reflections look less obvious is because the image is darker. The reflections don't seem that obtrusive in the image without the polarizer.

I notice that your aperture is set to f2.8. You've probably done so to maximize shutter speed and lower ISO. Main problem is that you won't get elements in the room in sharp focus. Tripod use is preferable, so that you can close down the aperture and use a slower shutter speed (assuming that the lighting is fine to begin with). A wide angle lens is also preferable for indoor room shots.

The Name is Bond Regular Member • Posts: 235
Re: Polarizer for indoor real estate photography?
1

Polarisers are useful to reduce strong reflected light from windows or stronger contre-jour. You can avoid burning out the reflection light. However, that's going to be more true of interiour shots without flash.

noflashplease Senior Member • Posts: 2,490
Re: Polarizer for indoor real estate photography?

I would think that your XF 14mm F2.8 R would have been the ideal lens for this shot?

(unknown member) Senior Member • Posts: 1,321
Re: Polarizer for indoor real estate photography?
1

The Name is Bond wrote:

Polarisers are useful to reduce strong reflected light from windows or stronger contre-jour. You can avoid burning out the reflection light. However, that's going to be more true of interiour shots without flash.

Exactly. When strong outdoor light reflects off of shiny surfaces such as hardwood flooring  or polished stone counter tops, a polarizing filter is useful. If you use off-camera flashes to match the interior light with the light from outdoors, the filter requires more flash power, more flashes and, or a wider aperture.

Reflections from flashes require a polarizing filter gel for the flash and a filter with the opposite polarization for the lens.

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