Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

Started Jun 5, 2014 | Discussions
chicoes Regular Member • Posts: 268
Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

On the end of July I will be going to Thailand for 3 weeks for my honeymoon.

My current camera is the SX160 IS and since this trip is going to be a once or twice in a lifetime trip, I want to buy a better camera to take better pics than my SX160 takes and also be able to take good pictures on low light hand held without blurriness and be able to get good results with above 800 ISO and give me better photos than my cell phone.

Up until about a month ago I was seriously considering the S120 but since the G1X MKII was out I was seriously thinking about it and reading all sorts of opinions and reviews, but I still dont know for 100% if its the best choice for me. I do know I want a camera with a sensor that is atleast 1" and I do want a flip LCD screen and a wide angle.

First, I will not buy the camera in my country. I have a family relative that comes from the USA and I am going to ask him to bring it with him since its cheaper in the USA.

I know I love canon cameras for the colors and mostly for the intuitive and easiness of going through the different settings. I only had canon cameras so far and got used to them. I was considering also the rx100 MKIII, but the schedule is tight so I am not sure I'll be able to get it on time.

The camera will be used mainly as a travel camera, vacations, friends meeting and family. Im not a professional and probably not going to use it for artistic photos.

Also, since I have no knowledge in LR or Photoshop nor do I have the time to learn how to edit photos, I probably wont be using RAW, but rather OOC JPG.

So What I want to know is, considering all of the above, and the fact that I mostly take pictures on P mode and occasionally on Av mode, would I still get good results with the camera? or do I need to be more like a starter pro to be able to get good results?

how easy is the learning curve of the camera? I will have only about 20 days to learn how to use it before I leave for my vacation.

Bottom line, is it the right camera for me?

Thanks in advance

Canon PowerShot S120 Canon PowerShot SX170 IS Sony RX100
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c.hammett Forum Pro • Posts: 12,091
Re: A suggestion...
1

First, I have the original G1X and not the MK II, but regarding the camera for travel, I do have quite a bit of experience there. Regardless of whether you get the MKII, for a trip like you are planning, I would definitely recommend taking some kind of backup camera in case of a problem. i never go on a trip without a backup, as I have been on two trips where I had camera failure (in film days) and no possibility of repair or replacement. I would have been out-of-business photographically if I hadn't taken a backup (then SLR) camera, which I left locked in my luggage at the hotel.

Now that I've geared down to smaller cameras for travel, my three most recent trips have been with the G1X and SL1. I use both about equally. Since they are relatively small, I have both with me most all of the time, except at night, when I personally am not fond of taking pictures in restaurants, and just take the G1X in my purse for a few outdoor night pictures.

When I say I use both about equally,  a lot of the time, it depends on which camera I happen to have in my hand !  But generally,  I do prefer the G1X in museum type settings as I love the way the G1X handles  indoor and low lighting. I prefer the SL! for street shots, due to it's instant shutter response. I don't know how the G1X MK II compares to either the original G!X or the SL! in quick response for grab shots, but you might check on that if it is important to you.

Bottom lineā€¦ regardless of what primary camera you buy,do take some kind of backup, even an inexpensive p/s you can drop in a pocket. I could be a "memory saver" in an emergency.

Cheers ! carolyn

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Fudgington Junior Member • Posts: 46
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

I'd go for the S120 with spare battery - it's a great travel camera. Set up the custom mode for jpegs -vivid colour, exposure about minus 2/3, and you're good to go for outdoor pics. Use your P mode with My Colours for your people and indoor shots. Back them up on an iPad or iPhone using wireless if you want. No need to over-complicate things on your honeymoon, and your wife will love you forever!

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xzactly Junior Member • Posts: 30
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

chicoes wrote:

On the end of July I will be going to Thailand for 3 weeks for my honeymoon.

My current camera is the SX160 IS and since this trip is going to be a once or twice in a lifetime trip, I want to buy a better camera to take better pics than my SX160 takes and also be able to take good pictures on low light hand held without blurriness and be able to get good results with above 800 ISO and give me better photos than my cell phone.

Above 800 ISO, G1X II Hands down, huge difference. ISO 3200 look good.

I have the S120, small, quick response in operation. Even at base ISO, G1X II has a much better image.

Higher ISO's no comparison, it's in another league.

If your considering the S120, get a couple extra batteries. I'll use 4 batteries on a busy day.

Up until about a month ago I was seriously considering the S120 but since the G1X MKII was out I was seriously thinking about it and reading all sorts of opinions and reviews, but I still dont know for 100% if its the best choice for me. I do know I want a camera with a sensor that is atleast 1" and I do want a flip LCD screen and a wide angle.

Flip screen does work well, I'am getting use to it. I like to shoot from my hip and chest.

The camera will be used mainly as a travel camera, vacations, friends meeting and family. Im not a professional and probably not going to use it for artistic photos.

Should be fine, depth of field is pretty narrow shooting wide open.

Keeping everything sharp can be tough. Beautifully blurs the background making people pop out.

So What I want to know is, considering all of the above, and the fact that I mostly take pictures on P mode and occasionally on Av mode, would I still get good results with the camera? or do I need to be more like a starter pro to be able to get good results?

I use Av mode and manual. It has 2 custom modes. I would program C1 for indoors, and C2 for outdoors.

Both in Av mode, C1 at f2.8 or less, and C2 f5.6 or higher. I let C1 go to ISO 3200, C2 hold at ISO 800.

You should get good results with a little practice. And practice using the flash and bouncing it.

Easy to lift back with your finger, hopefully bouncing off a white ceiling, Big difference.

how easy is the learning curve of the camera? I will have only about 20 days to learn how to use it before I leave for my vacation.

Easy if you are use to Canon's menu's, You can customize the Func menu to see only what you want.

And customize a menu with features you use most. Same as the S120

Bottom line, is it the right camera for me?

I could be,,, It's not perfect, has a very good image, wouldn't call it pocket-able.

Zac

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Canon PowerShot A720 IS Canon PowerShot S120 Canon G1 X II Canon EOS 40D Canon EF 24mm f/2.8 +3 more
(unknown member) Senior Member • Posts: 2,853
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

chicoes wrote:

On the end of July I will be going to Thailand for 3 weeks for my honeymoon.

Congratulations!

My current camera is the SX160 IS and since this trip is going to be a once or twice in a lifetime trip, I want to buy a better camera to take better pics than my SX160 takes and also be able to take good pictures on low light hand held without blurriness and be able to get good results with above 800 ISO and give me better photos than my cell phone.

Excellent reasons to buy a new camera.  There is a recommendation here for the S120, but if low light and high ISO are a big deal it won't be up to the task despite it being a great little camera.

Up until about a month ago I was seriously considering the S120 but since the G1X MKII was out I was seriously thinking about it and reading all sorts of opinions and reviews, but I still dont know for 100% if its the best choice for me. I do know I want a camera with a sensor that is atleast 1" and I do want a flip LCD screen and a wide angle.

Then the S120 is right out since the sensor isn't near a 1".  Here's the trick though, since you're used to a small sensor compact you'll need time to get used to a large sensor.  If you're leaving at the end of July you need to buy the camera now and spend a little time every day using it.  I'd say thirty minutes a day if not more will do the trick.  Read the manual, use the camera, and learn how the settings affect image quality.  You'll be working with a very narrow depth of field and you'll need to see how macro shots look at various apertures (discussed here quite a bit....which is to say, macro with a wide-open aperture is a bit foggy, but stop it down just a bit and they are nicely sharp).

First, I will not buy the camera in my country. I have a family relative that comes from the USA and I am going to ask him to bring it with him since its cheaper in the USA.

As long as you're confident that narrow depth of field, considered desirable by many but still different than typical point and shoots, is something you can work with then order now.  You'll quickly figure out if you want to shoot in Aperture Priority in order to control depth of field or if you're okay with P or [ ] (full auto).

I know I love canon cameras for the colors and mostly for the intuitive and easiness of going through the different settings. I only had canon cameras so far and got used to them. I was considering also the rx100 MKIII, but the schedule is tight so I am not sure I'll be able to get it on time.

Not a bad camera, but high ISO will turn out better on the G1 X II.  Better zoom range on the G1 X as well.

The camera will be used mainly as a travel camera, vacations, friends meeting and family. Im not a professional and probably not going to use it for artistic photos.

Also, since I have no knowledge in LR or Photoshop nor do I have the time to learn how to edit photos, I probably wont be using RAW, but rather OOC JPG.

I'll give you some advice I wish someone would have given me years ago:  shoot RAW+JPEG even if you only want the JPEG.  After a while you might learn how to process RAW files and with memory being so cheap those precious moments will likely get some processing time invested years down the road that will make you happy about controlling the processing, especially for purposes of printing.

So What I want to know is, considering all of the above, and the fact that I mostly take pictures on P mode and occasionally on Av mode, would I still get good results with the camera? or do I need to be more like a starter pro to be able to get good results?

Sounds like you're in a perfect position to get started learning a new camera.  Seriously, you should have several hours of practice under your belt before you leave.  Shoot, download, and look at your images.

how easy is the learning curve of the camera? I will have only about 20 days to learn how to use it before I leave for my vacation.

Aha.  20 days and how much time every day?  The learning curve isn't bad, but you don't want to learn on your honeymoon.  Using the camera probably won't be a big time investment, but learning how to get the results that you find pleasing will take some effort.  Big sensor means focus is going to be much more important to you.  You might need to choose between center point focus or flexizone/face detect and then learn how to focus/recompose or learn to trust the camera.  Also, exposure lock is no longer a button on the Mark II, but the Movie Record button can be configured to lock exposure (rather than the bizarre shortcut that is the default method).  You'll also have to get comfortable with the control rings on the front.

I guess I should say that I own the G1 X and not the Mark II, but most of the learning curve will be with a large sensor and the output of your images.

Bottom line, is it the right camera for me?

Thanks in advance

Tom Hoots
Tom Hoots Veteran Member • Posts: 6,073
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?
4

chicoes wrote:

My current camera is the SX160 IS and since this trip is going to be a once or twice in a lifetime trip, I want to buy a better camera to take better pics than my SX160 takes and also be able to take good pictures on low light hand held without blurriness and be able to get good results with above 800 ISO and give me better photos than my cell phone.

You have said it right there. ONLY unless "it MUST be a small, pocket camera" is your main criteria, the G1X Mark II is what I would recommend for you. If it's got to fit into your pocket, then the S120 would do a decent job.

To me, the G1X Mark II is "the perfect travel camera" -- with its fast, versatile lens, it has what a camera needs in order to take shots of "whatever you see that you want to capture. And the large sensor will give you image quality that will easily surpass something like the S120, at all ISO settings. Finally, the large sensor and the fast lens will give you low-light capabilities that no other Canon "powershot" camera could possibly give you.

The bottom line is that, for a "once in a lifetime" experience, I would want the better image quality and more capable lens that the G1X Mark II would give me. I think you are absolutely on the mark by considering it.

It won't take long to get up to speed with the camera -- its controls are like any other Canon camera. The main learning curve would be about what you can do with the fast lens and the big sensor -- getting blurred backgrounds and such. P mode will do very well for most shooting, but you may want to switch to aperture priority or manual modes for certain shots, like when you want to make sure that everything is in focus, or if you're trying to capture city lights at night -- stuff like that. Again, P mode will do quite well for everyday, outdoor shots, but there might be times when you'll want something other than what P mode would "normally" do. So, again, that's where some experience with the camera will help you understand when you might want to use the different modes, choose your own settings, and so on.

I would recommend getting at least one extra battery, though I'm very satisfied with the battery life I've gotten out of a single battery charge. And, I can recommend two high-quality bags that will work with it well:

The ThinkTank Mirrorless Mover 5 bag with fit the camera well, and it'll give you room for an extra battery or two, a filter or two, some extra memory cards, and so on:

http://www.thinktankphoto.com/products/mirrorlessmover5.aspx

And the Mountainsmith Cyber Medium bag "fits the camera like a glove" -- it's probably the most minimal "high quality" bag I've found. The dimensions are actually a hair smaller than the G1X Mark II's dimensions, but it has enough "wiggle room" to fit the camera in there just perfectly. It really only has room for an extra memory card, and perhaps an extra battery, in the mesh pocket inside the lid of the bag. And, the strap on the back will let you attach it to any kind of vertical strap, via its velcro closure, or a belt will slip in underneath the whole strap thing, for a horizontal attachment. Here's the web site for it:

http://mountainsmith.com/index.php/products/accessories/cyber-ii-medium.html

Other things to consider is that you need to purchase the lens hood separately if you want one, and you'll need the filter adapter if you want to fit filters to the camera.  And you can purchase the bigger, optional hand grip directly from Canon, if you would like to swap that for the default, smaller grip.

I hope this helps -- good luck, and congratulations!

Tom Hoots
http://www.pbase.com/thoots
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/4330317199/albums

jonrobertp Forum Pro • Posts: 12,875
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

It only took me one week to be ok w the new G before a major trip.  If you shoot in P mode it will be fine most of the time, but like Sony also does the shutter speed can drop to 1/20 second.

so if that is too slow for you then simply set the S mode to 1/50 or 1/80 or 1/125 for after the sunsets.  Depends on if you shoot moving cars or mostly still scenes,  and also how steady your hands are.  I can do 1/20 just about always....for most landscape and architecture shots.

Jpgs. Ooc ...not a problem.

need a jacket pocket or small travel bag to hold along w your water bottle.  Cheers

J

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lilBuddha Senior Member • Posts: 1,562
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

I like my G1X MII more every time I use it. Pocketability is a downside because it will not fit into trouser pockets. If you are looking towards the Sony's, I would go with the RX100 II, not III because of the extra zoom range. Though the III does go wider.

For that reason, I would still go with the G1X MII, because it has the 24 and the 120, so it is more versatile.

All three great cameras, though.

OP chicoes Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: A suggestion...

Thank you. I didnt think about it. I will take my SX160 IS just in case

OP chicoes Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

Thanks for your reply.  Like I said, I was thinking about the S120 at the beginning, but then realized that if I am going to invest money and buy a camera, I would like it to have a flip screen and be no less than 1", so although it highly pocketable, it doesnt answer my requirements.

OP chicoes Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

Tom Hoots wrote:

chicoes wrote:

My current camera is the SX160 IS and since this trip is going to be a once or twice in a lifetime trip, I want to buy a better camera to take better pics than my SX160 takes and also be able to take good pictures on low light hand held without blurriness and be able to get good results with above 800 ISO and give me better photos than my cell phone.

You have said it right there. ONLY unless "it MUST be a small, pocket camera" is your main criteria, the G1X Mark II is what I would recommend for you. If it's got to fit into your pocket, then the S120 would do a decent job.

To me, the G1X Mark II is "the perfect travel camera" -- with its fast, versatile lens, it has what a camera needs in order to take shots of "whatever you see that you want to capture. And the large sensor will give you image quality that will easily surpass something like the S120, at all ISO settings. Finally, the large sensor and the fast lens will give you low-light capabilities that no other Canon "powershot" camera could possibly give you.

The bottom line is that, for a "once in a lifetime" experience, I would want the better image quality and more capable lens that the G1X Mark II would give me. I think you are absolutely on the mark by considering it.

It won't take long to get up to speed with the camera -- its controls are like any other Canon camera. The main learning curve would be about what you can do with the fast lens and the big sensor -- getting blurred backgrounds and such. P mode will do very well for most shooting, but you may want to switch to aperture priority or manual modes for certain shots, like when you want to make sure that everything is in focus, or if you're trying to capture city lights at night -- stuff like that. Again, P mode will do quite well for everyday, outdoor shots, but there might be times when you'll want something other than what P mode would "normally" do. So, again, that's where some experience with the camera will help you understand when you might want to use the different modes, choose your own settings, and so on.

I would recommend getting at least one extra battery, though I'm very satisfied with the battery life I've gotten out of a single battery charge. And, I can recommend two high-quality bags that will work with it well:

The ThinkTank Mirrorless Mover 5 bag with fit the camera well, and it'll give you room for an extra battery or two, a filter or two, some extra memory cards, and so on:

http://www.thinktankphoto.com/products/mirrorlessmover5.aspx

And the Mountainsmith Cyber Medium bag "fits the camera like a glove" -- it's probably the most minimal "high quality" bag I've found. The dimensions are actually a hair smaller than the G1X Mark II's dimensions, but it has enough "wiggle room" to fit the camera in there just perfectly. It really only has room for an extra memory card, and perhaps an extra battery, in the mesh pocket inside the lid of the bag. And, the strap on the back will let you attach it to any kind of vertical strap, via its velcro closure, or a belt will slip in underneath the whole strap thing, for a horizontal attachment. Here's the web site for it:

http://mountainsmith.com/index.php/products/accessories/cyber-ii-medium.html

Other things to consider is that you need to purchase the lens hood separately if you want one, and you'll need the filter adapter if you want to fit filters to the camera. And you can purchase the bigger, optional hand grip directly from Canon, if you would like to swap that for the default, smaller grip.

I hope this helps -- good luck, and congratulations!

Tom Hoots
http://www.pbase.com/thoots
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/4330317199/albums

Thank you for the advice and the recommendations. I am not planning on using filters or adapters, so the 2nd bag should be enough I believe. All I need is an extra bat and a memory card.

Where can I order an extra battery for cheap? Or are the prices the same in all places?

Tom Hoots
Tom Hoots Veteran Member • Posts: 6,073
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

chicoes wrote:

Thank you for the advice and the recommendations. I am not planning on using filters or adapters, so the 2nd bag should be enough I believe. All I need is an extra bat and a memory card.

Where can I order an extra battery for cheap? Or are the prices the same in all places?

Most welcome!

It looks like $59.99 is the list price for the NB-12L battery -- most mail-order places will bring that down to $49.99, but if you pay for shipping, that's going to wipe out most of the savings. So, if you can find one locally, you might as well get it there. I know that lots of people use "third party" batteries, but I have always stuck with the OEM batteries. And, these days, the camera manufacturers are doing things like putting chips or something in their batteries so the cameras will recognize "their" batteries, so there's even more incentive to go for OEM batteries. All I can tell you is that I've heard lots of people whine about battery life, but you will NEVER hear it from me -- perhaps that might have to do with the fact that I'm using OEM batteries, and perhaps they aren't.

At any rate, if you're spending that kind of money on the camera, you might as well buy the OEM battery for it, or at least that's how my thinking goes.

I buy lots of things locally, but if I go online, I've been very happy with B&H Photo -- I couldn't recommend them more highly. Here is a link to the G1X Mark II from them:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1028804-REG/canon_9167b001_powershot_g1x_mark_ii.html

I see that they're currently selling it with a free "SanDisk 32GB SDHC Memory Card Ultra Class 10 UHS-1," which is about as fast as you can get (UHS-1), so that's a fine SD card if you need one.

And, there are links on the page to stuff like the battery and the lens hood, if you'd like to order them right there.

Again, I hope this helps -- good luck!

Tom Hoots
http://www.pbase.com/thoots
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/4330317199/albums

MinAZ
MinAZ Senior Member • Posts: 4,045
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

It depends on your expectations. This is a tough camera to get the most out of, and you may be disappointed with results at first until you get used to it. Furthermore, there are many advanced features that take some getting used to, and especially the interface is not as simple as other Canon cameras. However, if you just want a camera that gives good quality images and are not too picky, the G1XII can surely fit the bill. Or if you are willing to put some time and effort into learning the camera, it can give excellent images.

OP chicoes Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

MinAZ wrote:

It depends on your expectations. This is a tough camera to get the most out of, and you may be disappointed with results at first until you get used to it. Furthermore, there are many advanced features that take some getting used to, and especially the interface is not as simple as other Canon cameras. However, if you just want a camera that gives good quality images and are not too picky, the G1XII can surely fit the bill. Or if you are willing to put some time and effort into learning the camera, it can give excellent images.

Well, as I said, my knowledge in photography is rather limited as up until now I have always used the simple canon cameras. I am aware that the G series is a step up or even a big step up from my SX160 IS and I do hope that the fact the camera is more complicated than the simpler PowerShots would give me a drive to mess with it a lot and learn.

I do want a good image quality and I do want to be able to take shots at ISO 800 and up without getting extra noisy pictures. I dont know if I can count on it, but from looking at Imaging Resource ISO shots, it looks like you get good details even even at 3200 not to mention 1200, which is way more than I could get from my SX160. Actually, comparing it to the RX100 III, the G1X II shows better results in higher ISO and I didnt really see much difference in lower ISO either. The flip out screen is something I miss since I had the Canon PowerShot A95 a long long time ago.

You say that the there are many advanced features that take some getting used to, and that the interface is not as simple as other Canon cameras, so I do hope that the extra features and the more complicated interface wont do the opposite and demotivate me, making feel like it was too much for me.

Allard54 New Member • Posts: 1
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

Having had three of the G series before this one I can clearly say that this is the best by far. tyhe image quality and ease of handling can't be beat...it is a bit "spendy" but you do get what you have paid for...good luck with it....MP

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Canon G1 X II
MinAZ
MinAZ Senior Member • Posts: 4,045
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

chicoes wrote:

MinAZ wrote:

It depends on your expectations. This is a tough camera to get the most out of, and you may be disappointed with results at first until you get used to it. Furthermore, there are many advanced features that take some getting used to, and especially the interface is not as simple as other Canon cameras. However, if you just want a camera that gives good quality images and are not too picky, the G1XII can surely fit the bill. Or if you are willing to put some time and effort into learning the camera, it can give excellent images.

Well, as I said, my knowledge in photography is rather limited as up until now I have always used the simple canon cameras. I am aware that the G series is a step up or even a big step up from my SX160 IS and I do hope that the fact the camera is more complicated than the simpler PowerShots would give me a drive to mess with it a lot and learn.

I do want a good image quality and I do want to be able to take shots at ISO 800 and up without getting extra noisy pictures. I dont know if I can count on it, but from looking at Imaging Resource ISO shots, it looks like you get good details even even at 3200 not to mention 1200, which is way more than I could get from my SX160. Actually, comparing it to the RX100 III, the G1X II shows better results in higher ISO and I didnt really see much difference in lower ISO either. The flip out screen is something I miss since I had the Canon PowerShot A95 a long long time ago.

You say that the there are many advanced features that take some getting used to, and that the interface is not as simple as other Canon cameras, so I do hope that the extra features and the more complicated interface wont do the opposite and demotivate me, making feel like it was too much for me.

Yeah, if at all possible, try to get your hands on a copy of the camera (or even borrow a friend's) before making a commitment. When I first got my G1XII, I was really having a hard time with it, and I have owned quite a few P&S cameras. I think it took me about a month to get really comfortable with it, and the manual isn't all that good either. I really like the camera now, but that is much after the fact. Without showing you in person, it is hard for me to describe exactly what is hard about the camera's interface, but let's just say it is unlike any other P&S you have ever used.

Now that I have gotten used to the camera though, I can say that it is really a very nice camera so if you put in the effort you won't be disappointed. But these days you can also get a nice camera where the learning curve is easier - only you can decide which is best for you.

OP chicoes Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

MinAZ wrote:

chicoes wrote:

MinAZ wrote:

It depends on your expectations. This is a tough camera to get the most out of, and you may be disappointed with results at first until you get used to it. Furthermore, there are many advanced features that take some getting used to, and especially the interface is not as simple as other Canon cameras. However, if you just want a camera that gives good quality images and are not too picky, the G1XII can surely fit the bill. Or if you are willing to put some time and effort into learning the camera, it can give excellent images.

Well, as I said, my knowledge in photography is rather limited as up until now I have always used the simple canon cameras. I am aware that the G series is a step up or even a big step up from my SX160 IS and I do hope that the fact the camera is more complicated than the simpler PowerShots would give me a drive to mess with it a lot and learn.

I do want a good image quality and I do want to be able to take shots at ISO 800 and up without getting extra noisy pictures. I dont know if I can count on it, but from looking at Imaging Resource ISO shots, it looks like you get good details even even at 3200 not to mention 1200, which is way more than I could get from my SX160. Actually, comparing it to the RX100 III, the G1X II shows better results in higher ISO and I didnt really see much difference in lower ISO either. The flip out screen is something I miss since I had the Canon PowerShot A95 a long long time ago.

You say that the there are many advanced features that take some getting used to, and that the interface is not as simple as other Canon cameras, so I do hope that the extra features and the more complicated interface wont do the opposite and demotivate me, making feel like it was too much for me.

Yeah, if at all possible, try to get your hands on a copy of the camera (or even borrow a friend's) before making a commitment. When I first got my G1XII, I was really having a hard time with it, and I have owned quite a few P&S cameras. I think it took me about a month to get really comfortable with it, and the manual isn't all that good either. I really like the camera now, but that is much after the fact. Without showing you in person, it is hard for me to describe exactly what is hard about the camera's interface, but let's just say it is unlike any other P&S you have ever used.

Now that I have gotten used to the camera though, I can say that it is really a very nice camera so if you put in the effort you won't be disappointed. But these days you can also get a nice camera where the learning curve is easier - only you can decide which is best for you.

Where I live it would be VERY hard to mess with the camera before I buy it. None of my friends have it and stores barely have it it themselves. Basically Im going for it blind. As I said, im not even buying it in my country. Some of the stores have it here but it costs about $1000 here and its just for the camera, even before I had to spend money on a bag and an extra battery, so no way Im paying that amount.  Gonna make a shipment from B&H to a relative of mine in the states and he will bring it with him when he comes here, so even returning it if theres an issue would not be an easy task. So I really REALLY hope I will not be disappointed.

MinAZ
MinAZ Senior Member • Posts: 4,045
Re: Would the G1x MKII be good for me?

I wish you good luck with the camera. You will find lots of helpful people on this forum if you run into trouble, and the good side of buying a brand new model like this is that if you do end up regretting your purchase, it should be relatively easy to sell on E-bay for close to what you paid (as long as you keep it in good condition with the original packaging).

Tom Hoots
Tom Hoots Veteran Member • Posts: 6,073
Reality check.
3

chicoes wrote:

Where I live it would be VERY hard to mess with the camera before I buy it. None of my friends have it and stores barely have it it themselves. Basically Im going for it blind. As I said, im not even buying it in my country. Some of the stores have it here but it costs about $1000 here and its just for the camera, even before I had to spend money on a bag and an extra battery, so no way Im paying that amount. Gonna make a shipment from B&H to a relative of mine in the states and he will bring it with him when he comes here, so even returning it if theres an issue would not be an easy task. So I really REALLY hope I will not be disappointed.

OK, let's stand back a little bit here, take a big breath, and relax.

From my perspective, I think a lot of people make photography a lot more difficult than it needs to be.  But the reality is that modern cameras can do extremely well with their more automated modes.  No, you don't need to shoot in RAW.  No, you don't need to shoot in fully manual mode.  No, you don't have to manually fine-tune each and every shot you'll ever take.  Sure, you CAN do all of that, and some people do.  But, here is my perspective on things:

I've never been one to use "full automatic" modes, but I know that plenty of people use them to their satisfaction.  Personally, I use the "P" (program) mode most of the time, for most of my outdoor shooting.  Here's an example:

This is a shot taken on a bright, sunny day -- why do you need to specify all of your settings yourself?  This worked just fine using "P" mode.

Here is something slightly different:

I was a little worried that the camera's large sensor and fast lens might use a lower f/number and render some of this picture out of focus -- and I really wanted all of the plane and the building behind it to be in focus, so I changed to Aperture Priority mode, and chose f/8 as the aperture.  That is about the most I'll do for any "normal" picture -- if I really want to make sure that everything is in focus, I'll bump over to Aperture Priority mode, and make sure to use a higher f/number to keep everything in focus.

Otherwise, I'll just keep it in "P" mode for "normal" shooting.  I generally take control of settings to shoot things like "city lights at night" -- when "normal" settings might lighten things up too much, I want to make sure that I don't "blow out the lights" and use lower exposure settings than the camera would shoot on its own.

And so on.  None of this is very difficult at all, but it certainly would help if you could do some shooting before you head out on a "once in a lifetime" trip.  Still, you could probably use "P" mode for the whole trip and still come back with wonderful, wonderful shots.

The only other settings of note I use are the JPEG settings -- I use the "Custom" color mode (in the Function menu), so I can turn the Sharpness all the way up -- I find that the default settings leave Sharpness well below what I usually like to see.  That's all.  Otherwise, I use Auto ISO and Auto White Balance.  And shots like the two I posted above are just very routine for what I get out of the G1X Mark II.

At any rate, that's a quick primer for how I use the camera, but obviously there's a lot more to the camera than that.  You can put the camera to good use for bokeh shooting and all that, but perhaps that kind of thing might be something you wouldn't use so much during your trip, and you could spend time learning about that later.  The bottom line is that photography is a life-long learning process, and you don't have to learn everything on your first day.  I think you should be fine for your trip, and then you'll have a camera that you can really spend some time "learning photography" with over years to come.

I hope this helps -- good luck!

Tom Hoots
http://www.pbase.com/thoots
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/4330317199/albums

OP chicoes Regular Member • Posts: 268
Can the camera fit in this bag?

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/737358-REG/Lowepro_LP36214_0AM_Adventura_Ultra_Zoom_100.html

Can I fit the camera here along with the memory card a the spare bat?

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