IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

Started Apr 15, 2014 | Discussions
RoelHendrickx
OP RoelHendrickx Forum Pro • Posts: 25,415
fisheye for architecture + picking the moment

R V C wrote:

Absolutely beautyful I love 4 ( its hypnotic, how did u manage that)

There really is no magic to it - I just know what a fisheye will do in certain circumstances.

(As you may know, I use Fisheye A LOT)

In this case I took position crouched low, aimed upward, pressed my back against the wall so as to include both the skylight and the two "doors" and waited for a moment with silhouettes in both.  I got lucky that it was one man and three women, clearly defined against blown sky.

5 for the dreamy surreal look of the landscape and 9 for the momentum in the photo.

The waving flag is the best of a sequence of three or four shots, in which the lesser photos have overlap between the flag and the buildings.  It's a question of picking your "decisive moment" from four options, after the fact...

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Roel Hendrickx
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Ollie 2 Senior Member • Posts: 1,558
Re: IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

Great shots, Roel. Really nice consistent processing too.

One criticism….where was the the Voigt??????!!!!!

Too heavy, right?

You left it at home, didn’t you?

Post some more. It makes for a nice series.

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LifeIsMyLens
LifeIsMyLens Forum Member • Posts: 96
Re: IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

Great set of pictures! Like them in B/W and also like the versatility of the set. Well done. Looks like you had a greattravel over there.

Wanda

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mujana Veteran Member • Posts: 5,091
Re: IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

RoelHendrickx wrote:

I have been back home for a few days after 15 truly wonderful days in Iran.

Impressive landscapes, beautiful cities and most importantly: friendly and hospitable people.

We had prepared with a bit of basic farsi/persian, and that was the best move ever.

In the coming weeks I will be processing a truckload of images, to result in multiple galleries.

For now, I'll just share some B&Ws that I already converted in-camera while still there.

Useful to get a quick first impression of what B&W could look like later.

I've done a few slight LR tweaks on the OOC JPGs. More subtle work (and colour) will come later.

Quick gallery of those first impressions is here: http://roelh.zenfolio.com/p551801606

Some samples:

Night train Tehran-Shiraz (µFT Oly 45mm at F1.8)

Shiraz, courtyard of Imamzadeh-ye Ali Ebn-e Hamze (µFT Oly 40-150mm)

Shiraz, outside Arg-e Karim Khan (with uncharacteristic rain for this southern city) (µFT Oly 12-40mm)

Entrance portal of the Caravanserai of Meybod (near Yazd) (Rokinon 7.5mm FE)

Grab shot through the windshield of our car on the road from Yazd to Isfahan (µFT Oly 40-150, S priority)

Portal of Masjed-e Shah (Imam) in Isfahan (µFT Oly 12-40mm)

Dry Zayandeh river in Isfahan and Si-O Seh bridge (Rokinon 7.5mm FE)

our guide Zahra in the Caravanserai Marenjab near Kashan (µFT Oly 45mm at F1.8 around sunset)

Masjed-e Agha Bozorg in Kashan (µFT Oly 12-40mm)

a foreign delegation (I understood: from Iraq) on pilgrimage in Qom (Rokinon 7.5mm FE)

Thank you for looking. Comments welcome.

Kheyli mamnoun!

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

Beautiful Roel!

I especially like the first two!

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RoelHendrickx
OP RoelHendrickx Forum Pro • Posts: 25,415
no Voigtländer - other lenses

Ollie 2 wrote:

Great shots, Roel. Really nice consistent processing too.

One criticism….where was the the Voigt??????!!!!!

Too heavy, right?

You left it at home, didn’t you?

I did indeed NOT take the Voigtländer 17.5mm.

When packing my travel photo bag, I did consider taking it (it is always on my shortlist), but it really took too much space, especially considering the shooting I anticipated.

I figured that I would be shooting mostly in good light anyway (much more daylight than nightlife in Iran), so using the Voigtländer for low light would not really be necessary: if I wanted it for shallow DOF in good light, I would have to start using ND filters, at the risk of losing the moment.

The Voigtländer for me is mainly a low light and indoors documentary lens.

I settled for :

E-M5 with 12-40 (main lens), small 40-150 for occasional tele, Rokinon 7.5mm for fisheye.

Those were used for the bulk of my shooting : the 12-40 problably for 80 % (superb gear), the 40-150 mainly for some compressed landscapes (I never felt the need for more reach) and building details and the 7.5mm for anything crazy (probably 10% of all shooting is fisheye, and for the keepers the ratio is higher).

For low light, I took the 45mm (used it sparingly) and the 20mm (I used it just once during an evening with Tehran friends-of-friends, but those shots are private.

And I took the LX7 as backup camera and to have something ready while travelling fully packed.

Post some more. It makes for a nice series.

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

RoelHendrickx
OP RoelHendrickx Forum Pro • Posts: 25,415
Zahra

brentbrent wrote:

Really nice photos, thanks!

I like the first shot a lot.

Great use of the fisheye.

Also, nice portrait of your guide, who has a winning smile!

Actually she was quite a shy, almost introverted person.

Very different from the taxidriver who was an exuberant little buddha figure.

We had them with us for one day (driving to some places around Kashan).

Towards the end of that day, she had become relaxed with us, speaking openly and freely with Els, laughing out loud and showing her nice smile, even striking "glamour" poses (but always with the scarf and manteau).

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Brent

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

(unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 3,915
Re: IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

I have been back home for a few days after 15 truly wonderful days in Iran.

Impressive landscapes, beautiful cities and most importantly: friendly and hospitable people.

We had prepared with a bit of basic farsi/persian, and that was the best move ever.

In the coming weeks I will be processing a truckload of images, to result in multiple galleries.

For now, I'll just share some B&Ws that I already converted in-camera while still there.

Useful to get a quick first impression of what B&W could look like later.

I've done a few slight LR tweaks on the OOC JPGs.  More subtle work (and colour) will come later.

Quick gallery of those first impressions is here: http://roelh.zenfolio.com/p551801606

Some samples:

Night train Tehran-Shiraz (µFT Oly 45mm at F1.8)

Shiraz, courtyard of Imamzadeh-ye Ali Ebn-e Hamze  (µFT Oly 40-150mm)

Shiraz, outside Arg-e Karim Khan (with uncharacteristic rain for this southern city) (µFT Oly 12-40mm)

Entrance portal of the Caravanserai of Meybod (near Yazd) (Rokinon 7.5mm FE)

Grab shot through the windshield of our car on the road from Yazd to Isfahan (µFT Oly 40-150, S priority)

Portal of Masjed-e Shah (Imam) in Isfahan (µFT Oly 12-40mm)

Dry Zayandeh river in Isfahan and Si-O Seh bridge (Rokinon 7.5mm FE)

our guide Zahra in the Caravanserai Marenjab near Kashan (µFT Oly 45mm at F1.8 around sunset)

Masjed-e Agha Bozorg in Kashan (µFT Oly 12-40mm)

a foreign delegation (I understood: from Iraq) on pilgrimage in Qom (Rokinon 7.5mm FE)

Thank you for looking. Comments welcome.

Kheyli mamnoun!

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

Superb! It is an amazing set and you are just getting started. Looking forward to seeing the galleries after you have processed the images!
--
SLOtographer
Gear: GH3, 7-14/4, 17/1.8, 25/1.4, 45/1.8, 35-100/2.8, 14-140/4-5.8
Canon 5D3, 35/2IS, 85/1.8, 135L, 580EXII
Ricoh GR

Sergeg
Sergeg Senior Member • Posts: 2,664
Re: custom and culture

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Sergeg wrote:

Superb series, how do people react to cameras, did you ever feel threatened?

I never ever felt threatened.

Most people loved being photographed.

But of course, I have a habit of approaching in a very open and disarming way: I never act sneakily and I think that probably there would be more adverse reactions if one tried to "steal" an image. On the contrary, I act openly (quite a necessity too when working with fisheye : you really have to get as close as you can, up to the point of a flying flag touching your head...)

In fact, I have never been photographed as much myself, as some kind of tourist attraction (the european guy with the camera). People asked my wife and myself frequently to pose with them.

There have been just a few exceptions: people that did not want to be photographed (and I respected that of course), mostly for cultural reasons:

- some older women in Abyaneh who probably had gotten tired of tourists

- sometimes girls and women in chador did not like their face to be photographed, but they did not mind to be in a shot in an anonymous was (hence quite a few silhouettes)

- when we visited a certain person in his home, he was VERY happy to pose himself and also his grandchildren, but his wife shied away, because she was not fully covered.

- in Kashan, we stumbled upon a wedding in full swing. The young bridegroom objected to me pointing a camera at his young wife (although she was made up and dressed like a Bollywood movie star), which made me wonder what the point was of all that display in broad daylight; I figured that this woman would probably soon be covered from the looks of all men...

Those were the exceptions.

(Oh yes, and I kept my camera tucked away too when we passed Natanz nuclear facility by bus, but that is another story.)

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

Sounds like an amazing experience, as the images do indeed testify.

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Pixnat2
Pixnat2 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,827
Re: IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

Wonderful series Roel!

Some of the best travel/reportage pictures I've seen on this forum.

The entrance portal picture is totally fascinating! But the second picture is my favorite, a photo that makes my imagination run!

The dramatic tone art style works very well, surprising!

Can't wait to see more!

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Cheers,
Frederic
http://azurphoto.com/

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RoelHendrickx
OP RoelHendrickx Forum Pro • Posts: 25,415
big words & travel advice...

robonrome wrote:

Roel, I think you've excelled yourself here and that's saying something.

Thank you. Those are big words.

The B&W really works especially those with robed figures and brings out the textural aspects of the architecture wonderfully.

I have found that the dramatic tone filter was much too crude for my taste in its first incarnation. But the newer B&W version is good for exactly that : bringing out texture.

Great use of fish eye as well.

Fisheye is becoming somewhat of a trademark lens for me...

You certainly make me want to go there!

Well, you should. It is really a great experience. Iran is much more "friendly" and open than we in the West would normally assume. The country gets a lot of bad press, but one should never confuse a government with its people.

I am thinking that (depending on political evolutions) tourism may start booming in Iran soon, and it is wise to try to visit a country BEFORE that wave, because tourism often spoils the spontaneity of how people react to foreigners.

We did never feel like we were being regarded as walking ATMs (like you can feel in other places).

Quite the contrary : I cannot count the times that we were offered tea, bread, meals, car rides etc for free.  Luckily, we had anticipated that, so we were well stocked on small Belgian gifts to return the favour.

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

RoelHendrickx
OP RoelHendrickx Forum Pro • Posts: 25,415
one of the best ever

Sergeg wrote:

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Sergeg wrote:

Superb series, how do people react to cameras, did you ever feel threatened?

I never ever felt threatened.

Most people loved being photographed.

But of course, I have a habit of approaching in a very open and disarming way: I never act sneakily and I think that probably there would be more adverse reactions if one tried to "steal" an image. On the contrary, I act openly (quite a necessity too when working with fisheye : you really have to get as close as you can, up to the point of a flying flag touching your head...)

In fact, I have never been photographed as much myself, as some kind of tourist attraction (the european guy with the camera). People asked my wife and myself frequently to pose with them.

There have been just a few exceptions: people that did not want to be photographed (and I respected that of course), mostly for cultural reasons:

- some older women in Abyaneh who probably had gotten tired of tourists

- sometimes girls and women in chador did not like their face to be photographed, but they did not mind to be in a shot in an anonymous was (hence quite a few silhouettes)

- when we visited a certain person in his home, he was VERY happy to pose himself and also his grandchildren, but his wife shied away, because she was not fully covered.

- in Kashan, we stumbled upon a wedding in full swing. The young bridegroom objected to me pointing a camera at his young wife (although she was made up and dressed like a Bollywood movie star), which made me wonder what the point was of all that display in broad daylight; I figured that this woman would probably soon be covered from the looks of all men...

Those were the exceptions.

(Oh yes, and I kept my camera tucked away too when we passed Natanz nuclear facility by bus, but that is another story.)

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

Sounds like an amazing experience, as the images do indeed testify.

Although it is easy to still be caught up in euphoria and thus not look at things objectively, I can still confidently say that it has been without a doubt one of the best travel experiences we had in our lifetime.

All the stars were aligned perfectly.

Many places on earth are beautiful nature-wise or city-wise and there are friendly people everywhere if you are open to that.

But the combination of those two factors is rare, because most beautiful spots are overrun by mass tourism and that often spoils the inter-human contact.  Not (yet) so in Iran.

And the food is yummie too, if you venture beyond the standard kabab and into more mysterious vegetarian and yoghurt-based territory (not forgetting the sweets). Ah well, and two weeks without a drop of alcohol have never hurt anybody...

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

RoelHendrickx
OP RoelHendrickx Forum Pro • Posts: 25,415
PS Robonrome

RoelHendrickx wrote:

robonrome wrote:

Roel, I think you've excelled yourself here and that's saying something.

Thank you. Those are big words.

The B&W really works especially those with robed figures and brings out the textural aspects of the architecture wonderfully.

I have found that the dramatic tone filter was much too crude for my taste in its first incarnation. But the newer B&W version is good for exactly that : bringing out texture.

Great use of fish eye as well.

Fisheye is becoming somewhat of a trademark lens for me...

You certainly make me want to go there!

Well, you should. It is really a great experience. Iran is much more "friendly" and open than we in the West would normally assume. The country gets a lot of bad press, but one should never confuse a government with its people.

I am thinking that (depending on political evolutions) tourism may start booming in Iran soon, and it is wise to try to visit a country BEFORE that wave, because tourism often spoils the spontaneity of how people react to foreigners.

We did never feel like we were being regarded as walking ATMs (like you can feel in other places).

Quite the contrary : I cannot count the times that we were offered tea, bread, meals, car rides etc for free. Luckily, we had anticipated that, so we were well stocked on small Belgian gifts to return the favour.

PS for more travel info : see also my responses (multiple) to Sergeg

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

agott123 Senior Member • Posts: 1,990
Excellent work Roel

Thanks for sharing

Alex

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Couldn't help but make me feel ashamed to live in a land
Where justice is a game. From Bob Dylan's 'Hurricane'

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MFiftysomething Contributing Member • Posts: 790
Re: IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

Nice work; must have been interesting to get off the usual tourist track!

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Zensu11
Zensu11 Senior Member • Posts: 1,542
Re: IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

Thank you for sharing your art. Please post more.

Bobby

Gravi
Gravi Senior Member • Posts: 1,537
good shots

thanks for posting

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Regards,
Gravi

Digitall
Digitall Regular Member • Posts: 417
Re: IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

Nice photos, the # 3 held my attention in particular. Congrats

Bob Tullis
Bob Tullis Forum Pro • Posts: 33,644
Re: IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

I find the dark spot that exhibits commonly in the D.Tone filter to be annoying.

But that hasn't ruined my enjoyment of this series.   Not one bit.  These are as much about sites in Iran as they are of your creative use of FL's.    

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.
"Well, sometimes the magic works. . . Sometimes, it doesn't." - Chief Dan George, Little Big Man
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Isca Senior Member • Posts: 2,135
Re: IRAN, as seen with E-M5 Dramatic Tone and Monotone (IMGS)

Great shots, particularly liked numbers 1, 5 and 6 but can't help but wondering if 5 would be better with those cables cloned out and then the shot cropped just above the foreground trees, the mountains and light there are magnificent!

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RoelHendrickx
OP RoelHendrickx Forum Pro • Posts: 25,415
on the mountains shot and why I won't change it
2

Isca wrote:

Great shots, particularly liked numbers 1, 5 and 6 but can't help but wondering if 5 would be better with those cables cloned out and then the shot cropped just above the foreground trees, the mountains and light there are magnificent!

I understand what you are saying.

And if I had set out to shoot a landscape carefully, from a well chosen position and on tripod maybe, I would have taken more care to avoid such distractions.

But for me this shot is as much about the drive as it is about the landscape.

Driving from Yazd to Isfahan around sunset, the light became more and more interesting and the landscape more and more abstract.

I saw these layers of mountains upon mountains and just shot it from the moving car, through the dirty windshield.  A reminder of beauty rushing by.  A fleeting glimpse with all its imperfections.

So I am not going to change anything more about it, because it must remain an image of the moment as much as an image of the subject.

Does that make any sense.

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

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