Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100

Started Feb 22, 2014 | Discussions
powerbook Regular Member • Posts: 478
Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100

Hello,

Maybe a stupid question (just received my new D7100)?

Is "Auto Focus Fine Tune" the same as I have been adjusted by Nikon Service at my other cameras (D70, D80, D90)?

At Nikon Service is my cameras sometimes been adjusted for either "Front Focus" or "Back Focus". How is it compared to this "original" adjustment as Nikon Service make of front-/backforcus?

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WryCuda Forum Pro • Posts: 11,040
Re: Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100

powerbook wrote:

Hello,

Maybe a stupid question (just received my new D7100)?

Is "Auto Focus Fine Tune" the same as I have been adjusted by Nikon Service at my other cameras (D70, D80, D90)?

At Nikon Service is my cameras sometimes been adjusted for either "Front Focus" or "Back Focus". How is it compared to this "original" adjustment as Nikon Service make of front/backforcus?

That's the same thing. Mine seems to be OK as delivered.

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BirgerH
BirgerH Veteran Member • Posts: 5,904
Re: Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100
1

powerbook wrote:

Hello,

Maybe a stupid question (just received my new D7100)?

Is "Auto Focus Fine Tune" the same as I have been adjusted by Nikon Service at my other cameras (D70, D80, D90)?

At Nikon Service is my cameras sometimes been adjusted for either "Front Focus" or "Back Focus". How is it compared to this "original" adjustment as Nikon Service make of front-/backforcus?

I think it is in now way the same.

Auto Focus Fine Tuning in D7x00 is a software alignment between a particular lens and the camera.

When Nikon adjust for back/front focusing, they are physicly adjusting the lever of the AF-sensor - and doing a software adjustment if possible - an adjustment for the camera for every lens unless you specify for a particular (and brought with) lens.

If it had been the same thing, Nikon could only adjust the Dx0 and The D3x00 and D5x00 for one lens. These cameras have no bank for lens alignments data.

BirgerH.

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WryCuda Forum Pro • Posts: 11,040
Re: Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100

BirgerH wrote:

powerbook wrote:

Is "Auto Focus Fine Tune" the same as I have been adjusted by Nikon Service at my other cameras (D70, D80, D90)?

I think it is in no way the same.

Auto Focus Fine Tuning in D7x00 is a software alignment between a particular lens and the camera.

7100 has a database of lens adjustments:

Each time you use the same lens, the camera will use the saved value for that lens as long as AF fine-tune is switched on. Settings for 12-20 lenses can be saved depending on camera used.

What Nikon does for other cameras is close enough to being equivalent, IMHO.

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BirgerH
BirgerH Veteran Member • Posts: 5,904
Re: Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100

WryCuda wrote:

BirgerH wrote:

powerbook wrote:

Is "Auto Focus Fine Tune" the same as I have been adjusted by Nikon Service at my other cameras (D70, D80, D90)?

I think it is in no way the same.

Auto Focus Fine Tuning in D7x00 is a software alignment between a particular lens and the camera.

7100 has a database of lens adjustments:

Each time you use the same lens, the camera will use the saved value for that lens as long as AF fine-tune is switched on. Settings for 12-20 lenses can be saved depending on camera used.

What Nikon does for other cameras is close enough to being equivalent, IMHO.

As I said - the Dx0 and the D3x00 and D5x00 has not. Nikon can't do a software lens alignment to particular lenses on the D70, D80 a.s.o, that must be made by physicly adjustments.

AF fine tuning is not a way to adjust generally back/front focusing, but to align minor lens-inaccuracies. Former this was done by physicly align the lens to the body.

Generally back/front focusing has to be physicly adjusted - with the D7x00 too - that's how I have understood the debate , not only in this forum, but also in others.

That was the OP's question - if the methods was the same - they are as far as I know not.

BirgerH.

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WryCuda Forum Pro • Posts: 11,040
Re: Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100

BirgerH wrote:

AF fine tuning is not a way to adjust generally back/front focusing, but to align minor lens-inaccuracies. Former this was done by physically align the lens to the body.

Generally back/front focusing has to be physicly adjusted - with the D7x00 too - that's how I have understood the debate, not only in this forum, but also in others.

That was the OP's question - if the methods was the same - they are as far as I know [they are]not.

The aim of either method is the same. I am not saying that your interpretation is wrong.

Nikon Article

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BirgerH
BirgerH Veteran Member • Posts: 5,904
Re: Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100

WryCuda wrote:

BirgerH wrote:

AF fine tuning is not a way to adjust generally back/front focusing, but to align minor lens-inaccuracies. Former this was done by physically align the lens to the body.

Generally back/front focusing has to be physicly adjusted - with the D7x00 too - that's how I have understood the debate, not only in this forum, but also in others.

That was the OP's question - if the methods was the same - they are as far as I know [they are]not.

The aim of either method is the same. I am not saying that your interpretation is wrong.

Nikon Article

Actually I don't think they are - it is imo a general misunderstanding.

It's two different Things to have a lens, which is a very Little misaligned, and having a camera, which is generally back/front focusing.

From your mentioned article:

If your lens has a focus problem you should return it to Nikon Service as AF Fine-Tune is not intended to solve optical problems which will generally be outside of scope for this tool. If you have a focus problem which is always present with different lenses then this would indicate a camera setting issue or that the camera has received impact damage which is causing general defocus problems. Again return it to service.

and:

AF tuning is not recommended in most situations and may interfere with normal focus; use only when required.

The "bold" is mine.

You have in this fora seen people who claim, that they should have all their lenses AF-fine tuned - and with some large numbers.

That would to me indicate, that they would be better off having the camera adjusted instead of the software parameters changed for every single lens.

Tha's why I don't agree, that the aim of the methods are the same.

I'm not an Expert here, but if I had general back/front focusing problems, I would certainly not mess around with the AF-fine tuning.

BirgerH.

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Westmill
Westmill Senior Member • Posts: 2,279
Re: Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100

BirgerH wrote:

WryCuda wrote:

BirgerH wrote:

AF fine tuning is not a way to adjust generally back/front focusing, but to align minor lens-inaccuracies. Former this was done by physically align the lens to the body.

Generally back/front focusing has to be physicly adjusted - with the D7x00 too - that's how I have understood the debate, not only in this forum, but also in others.

That was the OP's question - if the methods was the same - they are as far as I know [they are]not.

The aim of either method is the same. I am not saying that your interpretation is wrong.

Nikon Article

Actually I don't think they are - it is imo a general misunderstanding.

It's two different Things to have a lens, which is a very Little misaligned, and having a camera, which is generally back/front focusing.

From your mentioned article:

If your lens has a focus problem you should return it to Nikon Service as AF Fine-Tune is not intended to solve optical problems which will generally be outside of scope for this tool. If you have a focus problem which is always present with different lenses then this would indicate a camera setting issue or that the camera has received impact damage which is causing general defocus problems. Again return it to service.

and:

AF tuning is not recommended in most situations and may interfere with normal focus; use only when required.

The "bold" is mine.

You have in this fora seen people who claim, that they should have all their lenses AF-fine tuned - and with some large numbers.

That would to me indicate, that they would be better off having the camera adjusted instead of the software parameters changed for every single lens.

Tha's why I don't agree, that the aim of the methods are the same.

I'm not an Expert here, but if I had general back/front focusing problems, I would certainly not mess around with the AF-fine tuning.

BirgerH.

I am not being argumentative or anything but I certainly would and have. I have four lenses that I use on two D7100s. All 4 lenses needed fine tuning to the camera. All 4 lenses are now brilliant. Also all 4 needed different adjustments. The adjustment range vary from just 3 to 19.

Now obviously, the one which needed 19 was so far out it was all but unusable. This was the Sigma 50-150 but that is not important. That unusable lens is now simply biting sharp at any setting and distance. Same goes for all of them. Now of course it is possible to set a camera in one place so that you can get the best overall performance, which is what you do with cameras that do not have fine tuning. It is simply not possible or logical that you can set the sensor to be spot on for any lens though. Front and back focus is exactly what the fine tune is for. You only have a problem when faced with a lens that has a centering defect. In this case the lens needs to be sent off for calibration.

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Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 27,829
Still not the same
1

Westmill wrote:

BirgerH wrote:

WryCuda wrote:

BirgerH wrote:

AF fine tuning is not a way to adjust generally back/front focusing, but to align minor lens-inaccuracies. Former this was done by physically align the lens to the body.

Generally back/front focusing has to be physicly adjusted - with the D7x00 too - that's how I have understood the debate, not only in this forum, but also in others.

That was the OP's question - if the methods was the same - they are as far as I know [they are]not.

The aim of either method is the same. I am not saying that your interpretation is wrong.

Nikon Article

Actually I don't think they are - it is imo a general misunderstanding.

It's two different Things to have a lens, which is a very Little misaligned, and having a camera, which is generally back/front focusing.

From your mentioned article:

If your lens has a focus problem you should return it to Nikon Service as AF Fine-Tune is not intended to solve optical problems which will generally be outside of scope for this tool. If you have a focus problem which is always present with different lenses then this would indicate a camera setting issue or that the camera has received impact damage which is causing general defocus problems. Again return it to service.

and:

AF tuning is not recommended in most situations and may interfere with normal focus; use only when required.

The "bold" is mine.

You have in this fora seen people who claim, that they should have all their lenses AF-fine tuned - and with some large numbers.

That would to me indicate, that they would be better off having the camera adjusted instead of the software parameters changed for every single lens.

Tha's why I don't agree, that the aim of the methods are the same.

I'm not an Expert here, but if I had general back/front focusing problems, I would certainly not mess around with the AF-fine tuning.

BirgerH.

I am not being argumentative or anything but I certainly would and have. I have four lenses that I use on two D7100s. All 4 lenses needed fine tuning to the camera. All 4 lenses are now brilliant. Also all 4 needed different adjustments. The adjustment range vary from just 3 to 19.

Now obviously, the one which needed 19 was so far out it was all but unusable. This was the Sigma 50-150 but that is not important. That unusable lens is now simply biting sharp at any setting and distance. Same goes for all of them. Now of course it is possible to set a camera in one place so that you can get the best overall performance, which is what you do with cameras that do not have fine tuning. It is simply not possible or logical that you can set the sensor to be spot on for any lens though. Front and back focus is exactly what the fine tune is for. You only have a problem when faced with a lens that has a centering defect. In this case the lens needs to be sent off for calibration.

The result of a lens out of calibration and a body out of focus calibration will likely be back or front focusing results with PDAF. That said, factory recalibration of the lens or body is not the same thing as the AF-Fine tune adjustment feature.

Factory recalibration of the body will often include a physical adjustment of the main mirror, AF-Sub mirror, AF unit and the bottom of the mirror box, lens mount, and/or a software adjustment. Factory recalibration will affect the PDAF results you get with every single lens mounted. Factory recalibration of the lens will also be a physical adjustment and affect PDAF results regards any body the lens is mounted on.

The AF-Fine tune feature can not correct for front or back focusing that results from bad calibration of the AF-Sub mirror that often results in different focus when light temp drops below 5000k

The AF-Fine tune feature is not a physical adjustment and does not affect every lens. It simply inserts (bad word maybe) a delta into the PDAF calculation for any lens with the common chip (all Nikon 24-120 f4g lens will get the same delta applied, for example). AF-fine tune says that anytime the PDAF algorithms return a focus distance of x...add a correction to that of y. The AF-Fine tune feature is meant to address sample variation tolerances with different lens samples and is not meant to address body AF sample variation. With the exception of the "default" AF-fine tune setting which will add the same delta to every PDAF calculation with any chipped lens. Factory recalibration gets you a body that is closer to factory tolerances regards focus. AF-fine tune adjusts for specific lens and body tolerance mismatches. Factory recalibration of focus does not guarantee the body will focus perfectly with all lenses and AF-Fine tune may still be required for optimal performance with certain lenses. After factory recalibration, previous AF-Fine settings will no longer be valid.

Lens is soft

No perfect lens

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BirgerH
BirgerH Veteran Member • Posts: 5,904
Re: Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100

Westmill wrote:

BirgerH wrote:

WryCuda wrote:

BirgerH wrote:

AF fine tuning is not a way to adjust generally back/front focusing, but to align minor lens-inaccuracies. Former this was done by physically align the lens to the body.

Generally back/front focusing has to be physicly adjusted - with the D7x00 too - that's how I have understood the debate, not only in this forum, but also in others.

That was the OP's question - if the methods was the same - they are as far as I know [they are]not.

The aim of either method is the same. I am not saying that your interpretation is wrong.

Nikon Article

Actually I don't think they are - it is imo a general misunderstanding.

It's two different Things to have a lens, which is a very Little misaligned, and having a camera, which is generally back/front focusing.

From your mentioned article:

If your lens has a focus problem you should return it to Nikon Service as AF Fine-Tune is not intended to solve optical problems which will generally be outside of scope for this tool. If you have a focus problem which is always present with different lenses then this would indicate a camera setting issue or that the camera has received impact damage which is causing general defocus problems. Again return it to service.

and:

AF tuning is not recommended in most situations and may interfere with normal focus; use only when required.

The "bold" is mine.

You have in this fora seen people who claim, that they should have all their lenses AF-fine tuned - and with some large numbers.

That would to me indicate, that they would be better off having the camera adjusted instead of the software parameters changed for every single lens.

Tha's why I don't agree, that the aim of the methods are the same.

I'm not an Expert here, but if I had general back/front focusing problems, I would certainly not mess around with the AF-fine tuning.

BirgerH.

I am not being argumentative or anything but I certainly would and have. I have four lenses that I use on two D7100s. All 4 lenses needed fine tuning to the camera. All 4 lenses are now brilliant. Also all 4 needed different adjustments. The adjustment range vary from just 3 to 19.

Now obviously, the one which needed 19 was so far out it was all but unusable. This was the Sigma 50-150 but that is not important. That unusable lens is now simply biting sharp at any setting and distance. Same goes for all of them. Now of course it is possible to set a camera in one place so that you can get the best overall performance, which is what you do with cameras that do not have fine tuning. It is simply not possible or logical that you can set the sensor to be spot on for any lens though. Front and back focus is exactly what the fine tune is for. You only have a problem when faced with a lens that has a centering defect. In this case the lens needs to be sent off for calibration.

It is, what I've been saying:

If you have lenses needed calibrating (only just minor) you can use AF-fine tuning.

If you have a camera needing focus calibrating, you are better off to send it in. AF-fine tuning is imo not for the camera.

Thats why the aim of the methods are not the same.

I did say, I know, that if all your lenses showed focus-problems, it indicated the camera was off - to me it would anyway if it was with big numbers (15-20).

There must be a reason, that Nikon does not recommend a general use of the AF-fine tuning procedure. My guess is, that changing parameters in the cameras software will not be as accurate for all FL and Apertures of the lens, as a physical adjustment of the alignment. And will do no good at all, if the camera is out of adjustment.

BirgerH.

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Westmill
Westmill Senior Member • Posts: 2,279
Re: Still not the same

Yes it is always nice to know you are starting off on a level footing as it were The focus fine tune does seem to work miracles. I really expected to have to return the Sigma lens. All my lenses have been improved through the fine tune. What was the worst is now one of the sharpest. Others that only needed slight alteration are only slightly better. It seems crazy for anyone not to use it to me. If there is a lens that was so far out it refused to fine tune then I would suspect the camera would indeed need taking in for calibration. It makes sense to change the spark plugs before ripping out the engine

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Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 27,829
When to turn off

Westmill wrote:

Yes it is always nice to know you are starting off on a level footing as it were The focus fine tune does seem to work miracles. I really expected to have to return the Sigma lens. All my lenses have been improved through the fine tune. What was the worst is now one of the sharpest. Others that only needed slight alteration are only slightly better. It seems crazy for anyone not to use it to me.

One place you might find it detrimental is if you use it to fine tune your macro lens at 50x time focal length (as recommended). You might then find that when you shoot a portrait you're right on then when you go to shoot a flower at macro range you are way off. Knowing when to use it, and more importantly when to turn it off, is sometimes very helpful.

If there is a lens that was so far out it refused to fine tune then I would suspect the camera would indeed need taking in for calibration. It makes sense to change the spark plugs before ripping out the engine

There are simply types of front/back focus errors (can be small) that AF-fine tune can not correct for. AF-Sub mirror and lens mount issues as examples.

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Westmill
Westmill Senior Member • Posts: 2,279
Re: When to turn off

Mako2011 wrote:

Westmill wrote:

Yes it is always nice to know you are starting off on a level footing as it were The focus fine tune does seem to work miracles. I really expected to have to return the Sigma lens. All my lenses have been improved through the fine tune. What was the worst is now one of the sharpest. Others that only needed slight alteration are only slightly better. It seems crazy for anyone not to use it to me.

One place you might find it detrimental is if you use it to fine tune your macro lens at 50x time focal length (as recommended). You might then find that when you shoot a portrait you're right on then when you go to shoot a flower at macro range you are way off. Knowing when to use it, and more importantly when to turn it off, is sometimes very helpful.

If there is a lens that was so far out it refused to fine tune then I would suspect the camera would indeed need taking in for calibration. It makes sense to change the spark plugs before ripping out the engine

There are simply types of front/back focus errors (can be small) that AF-fine tune can not correct for. AF-Sub mirror and lens mount issues as examples.

Makes sense yes

Your second part about there can be different causes for front and back focus is kind of what I was saying really. If it will not tune in there is obviously a problem. I like to get every scrap of quality my lenses can produce so I might take mine in for calibration just to be safe when I am not busy. If nothing elses it would be very interesting to see if it made any difference. Just guessing here of course but I think.... because all my alterations have been + that if I had it calibrated then those that were low + alteration would become correct while the the Sigma would need less !  No idea really, I am just thinking out loud lol

When I get it done I shall perhaps write a full review. As this subject seems to crop up often and with a lot of different or varying opinions

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OP powerbook Regular Member • Posts: 478
How to set up the test?

Hello again,

Although I have read this article from Nikon:
https://nikoneurope-en.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/51633/~/how-to-use-the-af-fine-tune-function

... I'm a little unsure about the following, if I have to make a AF Fine Tune:

  1. Do I zoom in (tele) or is it wide I use to make the test?
  2. How close do I have on the subject? (how much should it fill the viewfinder)

All my lenses should I have checked (see gear list) to see if there is proper focus.

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Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 27,829
50x

powerbook wrote:

Hello again,

Although I have read this article from Nikon:
https://nikoneurope-en.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/51633/~/how-to-use-the-af-fine-tune-function

... I'm a little unsure about the following, if I have to make a AF Fine Tune:

  1. Do I zoom in (tele) or is it wide I use to make the test?
  2. How close do I have on the subject? (how much should it fill the viewfinder)

All my lenses should I have checked (see gear list) to see if there is proper focus.

1. Check at wide, middle, long, and then set for the best average that gets you the closest at most focal lengts.

2. Use a target that is flat, in goos light, and 50x the focal lenght away. If using a zoom...you would be changeing distances as focal lenth changes.

Determine AF fine tune settings using this method to be really accurate.
http://camerafocustest.blogspot.com/

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WryCuda Forum Pro • Posts: 11,040
It's the overall aim.

BirgerH wrote:

If you have lenses needed calibrating (only just minor) you can use AF-fine tuning.

If you have a camera needing focus calibrating, you are better off to send it in. AF-fine tuning is imo not for the camera.

That's why the aim of the methods are not the same.

There must be a reason, that Nikon does not recommend a general use of the AF-fine tuning procedure.

All that I was saying was that the aim of either method was to end up with images in focus.

My reading of the Nikon caution was that it was to dissuade users from fiddling unnecessarily. There was a thread on the Beginner's forum where the user was very unsure about how to set up the front/back test. Turned out the AF settings were not appropriate for the test, thankfully that was the cause of the problem.

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mosswings Veteran Member • Posts: 9,827
Re: It's the overall aim.

WryCuda wrote:

BirgerH wrote:

If you have lenses needed calibrating (only just minor) you can use AF-fine tuning.

If you have a camera needing focus calibrating, you are better off to send it in. AF-fine tuning is imo not for the camera.

That's why the aim of the methods are not the same.

There must be a reason, that Nikon does not recommend a general use of the AF-fine tuning procedure.

All that I was saying was that the aim of either method was to end up with images in focus.

My reading of the Nikon caution was that it was to dissuade users from fiddling unnecessarily. There was a thread on the Beginner's forum where the user was very unsure about how to set up the front/back test. Turned out the AF settings were not appropriate for the test, thankfully that was the cause of the problem.

Absolutely...if you don't know what you're doing AF Fine Tuning can screw things up worse. Mako has been very thorough in his discussion of what AF Fine Tuning is and is not.  The reason that Nikon offers for NOT using AF-fine tuning generally is that it is actually a very limited software offset that can cause problems with acquiring focus at the limits of the focusing range if large tuning values are used. Things like not being able to focus properly at infinity can crop up.

As he points out, for body or lens miscalibrations it is the wrong thing. For small sample variations in lens manufacture it is a useful thing. For 3rd party lenses it is the only thing. As long as Nikon keeps ignoring the step-up DX lens market and driving its customers to those 3rd party lenses, it is the necessary thing.  Sigma is very wise to offer their lens dock programming interface.

Of course, mirrorless photogs are somewhat bemused at us flippy mirror types right now, because for them AF fine tuning is an unnecessary obsolete thing.

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calson Forum Pro • Posts: 10,645
Re: Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100
1

The autofocus is primarily done with the camera's processors that rely on information from the lens and the autofocus sensors to determine when a lens is properly focused. There are going to be slight variations between lenses and this is exacerbated with inexpensive lenses, long focal length lenses, and higher resolution sensors. An autofocus error is going to be much more apparent with a 36MP D800 than the 12MP D300.

With AF fine tuning the user is providing an adjustment factor that the camera's electronics use to adjust the focus for a particular lens or lens and teleconverter combination. For my telephoto lenses I have four different AF fine tune settings with one for the lens alone and one for each of the three teleconverters. This is not something that can be done at the factory or by Nikon tech services people unless you send them all your cameras and lenses and have them calibrate each one and not only will this be very expensive it is not going to be as effective as having the user do the AF fine tuning. They can only calibrate a single lens and not make adjustments to the lens calibration based on attaching any of the three possible teleconverters to the camera.

With AF fine tuning Nikon provides a way for users to adjust for any lack of accuracy on the part of the lens, the camera, and the teleconverters that will be used with them. It is the only way this can be done and it is so simple to do that there is no excuse for not doing so. The idea that the Nikon factory default setting is superior to a AF Fine Tune setting is pure conjecture and with no basis in fact.

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mosswings Veteran Member • Posts: 9,827
Re: Question about "Auto Focus Fine Tune" on D7100

calson wrote:

The autofocus is primarily done with the camera's processors that rely on information from the lens and the autofocus sensors to determine when a lens is properly focused. There are going to be slight variations between lenses and this is exacerbated with inexpensive lenses, long focal length lenses, and higher resolution sensors. An autofocus error is going to be much more apparent with a 36MP D800 than the 12MP D300.

With AF fine tuning the user is providing an adjustment factor that the camera's electronics use to adjust the focus for a particular lens or lens and teleconverter combination. For my telephoto lenses I have four different AF fine tune settings with one for the lens alone and one for each of the three teleconverters. This is not something that can be done at the factory or by Nikon tech services people unless you send them all your cameras and lenses and have them calibrate each one and not only will this be very expensive it is not going to be as effective as having the user do the AF fine tuning. They can only calibrate a single lens and not make adjustments to the lens calibration based on attaching any of the three possible teleconverters to the camera.

With AF fine tuning Nikon provides a way for users to adjust for any lack of accuracy on the part of the lens, the camera, and the teleconverters that will be used with them. It is the only way this can be done and it is so simple to do that there is no excuse for not doing so. The idea that the Nikon factory default setting is superior to a AF Fine Tune setting is pure conjecture and with no basis in fact.

AF Fine Tuning is a useful adjunct to a factory calibrated camera and lens. The two procedures do quite different things.

AF Fine Tuning is designed to compensate for the small differences that crop up between lenses and bodies that perform close to the center of their respective manufacturing specifications. It is of limited power, able to fine tune only at a single focal length.

Factory default settings are sometimes off; the lens or camera does not conform to the center of its manufacturing specification, sometimes significantly.  AF Fine Tuning can only do so much.  It is then that the camera (and sometimes the lens) must be returned for recalibration.

Lenses and cameras are never tuned to each other at the service center - only to their individual specification centers. This way, both camera and lens will work with the greatest range of whatever they're paired with.

However, if you don't have a camera with AF Fine Tuning, your only option is to return to service for recalibration. And if you have a 3rd party lens, you're out of luck at Nikon service.

 mosswings's gear list:mosswings's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon Z50 Olympus XZ-1 Olympus Stylus 1 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm F3.5-5.6G ED VR +5 more
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