Will my NEX go the same way as my R1?

Started Dec 11, 2013 | Discussions
sroute Senior Member • Posts: 2,497
Re: Stop reading the doom and gloom posts?

Tom Caldwell wrote:
Reminds me of the spotting of the next Ricoh GXR model.

The difference between Ricoh and Sony is that Sony brings out new models frequently; the two do not seem comparable at all in this regard.

The old one ain't bust yet, wait a while, Sony might sell them some FF sensors ....

GXR is dead. You could shove a modern 24 or 36MP sensor and make it unusable and it'd be no less dead.

The camera doesn't have the bandwidth available to deal with the higher data rates needed to properly support higher resolution sensors. GXR already suffers from very poor shot to shot usability - that'd only become exacerbated by the need to transfer 2X and 3X more data. Let's not even start talking about the Ricoh viewfinder. Unless proven otherwise I have to assume the GXR platform simply can't take advantage of all this great new high bandwidth tech. Ok, it might not be dead, but it is stuck with sensor and electronics design several generations back.

GXR remains a serviceable camera but no simple sensor transplant will make it current or even "better". It won't happen.

GXRuser Contributing Member • Posts: 656
Re: RX10...

... is the R1 replacement. Sony likely didn't replace R1 with another (almost) APSc prosumer body likely because it now had Sony Alpha (2006) DSLRs. And until now when smaller sensor (1" and m43) have become quite popular.

As far as NEX goes, its primarily about renaming that line to represent the Alpha brand that they were always supposed to. Instead the name became synonymous with Alpha (instead of Alpha NEX) and even E-mount. I have seen many assume that NEX isn't even APSc (its really bad when the person is actually a professional). That, and a dramatic upgrade to UI that has been a NEX sore spot except may be on NEX-6. The new interface will be as seen in A7/7r and RX10, and familiar to A-mount users.

I wish Sony will bring the new menu structure to my NEX-6 and to the other Nex-7 and the others as an optional firmware update.

EinsteinsGhost
EinsteinsGhost Forum Pro • Posts: 11,977
Re: UnderDriven, the 5R with the EVF, in my opinion, is as close as Sony has come to

Karsten Meyer wrote:

I would never again buy a camera with a display like the Panasonic G models have. Why? You need much too much time to open it for usage. So I find my NEX-5R almost the best solution: I can open it with a snip of my finger. So I have taken some pictures while a Panasnic user is still fiddling with his display.

For what I shoot I have plenty of time--everyone has different needs...

I guess the Panasonic type of display is only working for people who use mostly the finder.

Most of my work is on a tripod, using the LCD. I sometimes need to stand to the side of the tripod, so I like an LCD that has lots of movement...

And about an R1 successor: I can't imagine a design which has a big(!) display on top of the camera. Yes, there had been such designs - I think of the cameras with the joint where the part with the lens is swivelling. But can someone imagine such a beast with a changeable lens?

It's not that it was on top, but that it was fully articulated. I agree that it is highly unlikely we will ever see an LCD on top of the camera again...

Btw: The biggest advantage of the R1 in comparison with my NEX for me is the ability to use it totally silent. So for me the R10 might be a decent successor of the R1.

That is important for some people, but in my case the sound doesn't matter. The RX10 may be a good camera for some people, although the sensor is very small. But if you want an all-in-one camera the RX10 may be the solution...

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“The world is going to pieces and people like Adams and Weston are photographing rocks!” --Henri Cartier-Bresson

Sony R2 today would be Alpha 58 with Sony Zeiss 16-80 (24-120mm equiv) lens on it and no option to change it.

A camera like RX10 makes more sense since smaller sensors have become popular and can perform well with the additional benefit of delivering more versatile focal length at a larger aperture (which also helps overcome sensor size issue).

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Charlie Lab
Charlie Lab Regular Member • Posts: 383
Re: do you have nightmares?

forpetessake wrote:

Some folks seem to have insecurity feelings, which only increase in this time of market shifts and rapid camera obsolescence. That's understandable, but they are looking for a relief in the wrong places, they probably need a shrink, rather than spilling their insecurities in the forum.

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There is nothing more unequal than the equal treatment of unequal people. -- Thomas Jefferson

For the cost of a few hours with a shrink, I can buy an A7R and cool old glass and spend unlimited hours of "therapy" out taking photos.  Under that light, I will now consider my quite-severe case of G.A.S. as a money-saver rather than a problem

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If you take a great photograph, I really don't care whether it came from a Leica or smartphone. Just share it.

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Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 31,676
Re: Stop reading the doom and gloom posts?

sroute wrote:

Tom Caldwell wrote:
Reminds me of the spotting of the next Ricoh GXR model.

The difference between Ricoh and Sony is that Sony brings out new models frequently; the two do not seem comparable at all in this regard.

Yes what is the "SP"  (from "starting price" bookmaker  ie: inside knowledge) on the release of the revised A7 series?  Not sure how long the average life of a Sony model might be before it is re-launched with a twist. There seems to be quite a lot of variations of the NEX about.   Maybe they should take a pause and do some solid work on their user interface and firmware?

The old one ain't bust yet, wait a while, Sony might sell them some FF sensors ....

GXR is dead. You could shove a modern 24 or 36MP sensor and make it unusable and it'd be no less dead.

The camera doesn't have the bandwidth available to deal with the higher data rates needed to properly support higher resolution sensors. GXR already suffers from very poor shot to shot usability - that'd only become exacerbated by the need to transfer 2X and 3X more data. Let's not even start talking about the Ricoh viewfinder. Unless proven otherwise I have to assume the GXR platform simply can't take advantage of all this great new high bandwidth tech. Ok, it might not be dead, but it is stuck with sensor and electronics design several generations back.

GXR remains a serviceable camera but no simple sensor transplant will make it current or even "better". It won't happen.

I bow to your superior knowledge and I also agree that the Ricoh viewfinder is not good, I never use mine.  But then I was never a fan of any clip on viewfinder.

Whilst I really enjoy my NEX6, great built in evf, great tilt lcd, good shot buffering it is still leagues behind the refinement of the GXR as user's camera  (despite the NEX6 being a much newer design), but I did not make my comment to suggest that the Ricoh aced anything or was without problems but merely to point out that the grunting over lack of announcement of the future of the NEX on this form is akin to the on and off grunting about what the future of the GXR might be on the Ricoh forum.

The rush of the forever new it seems.

The only real difference is that Ricoh seem to make cameras as a photographer's hobby whereas Sony are in the business of making more cameras and more cameras forever.

In my book it might take quite a while to make a revolutionary design such as the A7 type and the technology used is impeccable.  But on the other hand Sony give scant shrift to intuitive use it seems.  Obviously it can be declared  that the A7 which I have not yet seen anywhere near me might do all that is asked to the satisfaction of its owner but my direct comparison between the NEX6 and the GXR which might represent comparable-use cameras into the same market tells me that I have already mentioned all the areas where the NEX6 might win but the GXR has a much better user interface and more refined firmware.  In fact if I did not "need" to use my Canon EF lenses on a mirrorless camera body I would not have bothered with the NEX6. As it is the GXR-M is much more effective as a user's camera than  the NEX6 when combined with legacy glass on plain adapters. Designing and refining great firmware of course is not glamorous and must take even longer than the mechanical design of individual cameras to refine to perfection.  Ricoh has been refining their digital camera interface since the first GRD about 10 years ago.  Sony has a way to go yet by all accounts..

However if the camera works for the user and takes great pictures who am I to argue that the interface could do with some work.

I am not here to slash at the A7R but I do have personal experience with the NEX6 and Ricoh GXR and am able to  see the warts that each model exhibits and whilst the GXR is at least a four year old design  it is surprisingly competitive to the NEX6 as a user's camera.   In reality they are  not coparable at all as they are aimed at different parts of the market.

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Tom Caldwell

tomtom50 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,244
Mirrorless is the biggest segment in Japan/Asia

Nex is quite successful. It isn't going anywhere.

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Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 31,676
Can Sony trust the consumer to blindly buy every camera they make?

sroute wrote:

UnderDriven wrote:
Sony customers have a lot of angst because they don't trust Sony. Sony either doesn't realize this, or they don't care--either way, it makes them seem even less trustworthy...

I hear that frequently yet no one ever cites specifics.

Therefore, please cite specific instances where Sony has given NEX owners reason to not trust them. Extend that look to any Sony still camera system if you must.

It trust is such a problem it should be easy to compile a huge list.

Any company that makes things make them for a profit.  So where is the element of "trust" creeping in?  There is no contract between Sony and its customers other than that they make a camera (any camera they choose to make) and the user likes it and buys it.  The user can trust that it is well made and does its job.  End of story.

If the cameras fail to be appreciated for any reason then people simply don't buy them - that is the customer's prerogative.  The consumer might not buy every camera Sony choses to make as they reserve the right to like it or not like it without any accusation of consumer untrustworthiness.  But Sony can choose to make or not make any product - that is their right and it is 100% profit driven, no lack of trust there.

"Lack of trust" seems to imply saying one thing and doing another.  But if it is a question of not saying whether they will make more NEX models - that is their business not the consumers.

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Tom Caldwell

parallaxproblem Veteran Member • Posts: 5,335
Re: Stop reading the doom and gloom posts?

sroute wrote:

UnderDriven wrote:
Sony customers have a lot of angst because they don't trust Sony. Sony either doesn't realize this, or they don't care--either way, it makes them seem even less trustworthy...

I hear that frequently yet no one ever cites specifics.

Therefore, please cite specific instances where Sony has given NEX owners reason to not trust them. Extend that look to any Sony still camera system if you must.

It trust is such a problem it should be easy to compile a huge list.

A-mount
1. A700 owners waited 4 years before the upgraded A77 replacement finally arrived, abandoning high-end APS-C fans during this time and creating much frustration

2. A900/A850 were released and then that sector was seemingly abandoned for 4 years until the A99 was released. This created and then almost immediately abandoned the 'pro' sector. Only one firmware was released for A900 during this time and the JPEG engine remained (and remains) sub-standard and there are many other annoyances, even though a fix in firmware would probably have been possible

3. Sony suddenly stopped making OVF cameras and concentrated on SLT cameras without warning, abandoning OVF fans and again creating much frustration

4. Sony dropped the Minolta flash mount to make the cameras more appealing to new users. They released an adaptor but it is substandard and does not lock properly on the mount so is hated by most users. This has created an enormous amount of bad feeling in the A-mount community

5. Now Sony appear to be retreating from the low/mid A-mount camera range and returning to the high-end that they previously abandoned... again creating confusion and bad feeling amongst their A-mount customers

I am seeing big price drops in second-hand A-mount gear at the moment

E-mount
Never released the range pancake lenses that the system was crying out for and instead released lot of versions of the 18-200 lens because they thought we *ought* to be buying it

Poor QC on the lenses and a refusal to repair or replace lemons (at least in my case)

No official comment on what the dropping of the NEX brand name means for current NEX system customers

Sony don't seem to give a damn about their existing customers and are only interested in selling into new market sectors

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parallaxproblem Veteran Member • Posts: 5,335
Re: Can Sony trust the consumer to blindly buy every camera they make?

Tom Caldwell wrote:

sroute wrote:

UnderDriven wrote:
Sony customers have a lot of angst because they don't trust Sony. Sony either doesn't realize this, or they don't care--either way, it makes them seem even less trustworthy...

I hear that frequently yet no one ever cites specifics.

Therefore, please cite specific instances where Sony has given NEX owners reason to not trust them. Extend that look to any Sony still camera system if you must.

It trust is such a problem it should be easy to compile a huge list.

Any company that makes things make them for a profit. So where is the element of "trust" creeping in? There is no contract between Sony and its customers other than that they make a camera (any camera they choose to make) and the user likes it and buys it. The user can trust that it is well made and does its job. End of story.

If the cameras fail to be appreciated for any reason then people simply don't buy them - that is the customer's prerogative. The consumer might not buy every camera Sony choses to make as they reserve the right to like it or not like it without any accusation of consumer untrustworthiness. But Sony can choose to make or not make any product - that is their right and it is 100% profit driven, no lack of trust there.

"Lack of trust" seems to imply saying one thing and doing another. But if it is a question of not saying whether they will make more NEX models - that is their business not the consumers.

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Tom Caldwell

Tom

When you buy into an SLR or mirrorless system you are not buying an individual camera, you are buying a system. The more lenses and accessories you buy (which is what the manufacturers want you to do) the more you find yourself commited to that system. This is very different from buying an individual item like a P&S camera or a television which will pretty much exist on its own and can easily be replaced by another item from a different manufacturer when the time comes

It is true that there is no legal contract, but there is an implicit relationship that the camera system customer has with that manufacturer that the manufacturer will continue to make the sort of cameras that the user bought into the system with so that they can continue to use the lenses and accessories that they bought, into the future

For a manufacturer to not do that is effectively a breach of trust (not legal, but personal). Of course the manufacturer can do whatever they want, but they cannot then expect anybody sensible to buy their system equipment if there is the very real probability that the future system equipment will be almost unrecognisable from the current equipment

This is the question of trust...

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parallaxproblem Veteran Member • Posts: 5,335
Re: Mirrorless is the biggest segment in Japan/Asia

tomtom50 wrote:

Nex is quite successful. It isn't going anywhere.

Er, NEX has already gone!

Sony have announced that the name will no longer be used on any future products.  They have refused to say anything further

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Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 31,676
Re: Mirrorless is the biggest segment in Japan/Asia

tomtom50 wrote:

Nex is quite successful. It isn't going anywhere.

Interesting, coming from the land that took the slr concept and turned it into a slr/dslr art form to the almost exclusion of all others.

Maybe Europe and the Americas are more traditionalist or merely over-invested in dlsr lenses?  But the level of campact cameras sold gives reason to believe that Japan and Asia have decided that "mirrorless" (whatever that means) are a replacement for both.

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Tom Caldwell

aSevenArr Forum Member • Posts: 93
Re: Stop reading the doom and gloom posts?

UnderDriven wrote:

sroute wrote:

Here's an idea - assume the NEX form factor lives until Sony tells you it doesn't.

Sony customers have a lot of angst because they don't trust Sony. Sony either doesn't realize this, or they don't care--either way, it makes them seem even less trustworthy...

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“The world is going to pieces and people like Adams and Weston are photographing rocks!” --Henri Cartier-Bresson

Guaranteeing that your purchase would never become obsolete would be the same thing as committing a kind of corporate suicide.

It is precisely because Sony continues to innovate in these ways that we get these excellent and exciting new game changing products like the A7 and the A7r.

If you want a warm fuzzy "business as usual" approach then go with Nikon instead and spend $$$$$ for minor and conservative upgrades.

If you want cutting edge designs that head off in completely new directions then stick with Sony.

Personally I much prefer the freshness of the latter approach.

If the camera business is going to survive they must innovate with the times and provide exciting and compelling new products.

proxy Regular Member • Posts: 249
Re: Stop reading the doom and gloom posts?

parallaxproblem wrote:

No official comment on what the dropping of the NEX brand name means for current NEX system customers.

No comment because it means simply nothing to the existing customers. They can still keep (I hope) their NEX cameras.

Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 31,676
Re: Can Sony trust the consumer to blindly buy every camera they make?

parallaxproblem wrote:

Tom Caldwell wrote:

sroute wrote:

UnderDriven wrote:
Sony customers have a lot of angst because they don't trust Sony. Sony either doesn't realize this, or they don't care--either way, it makes them seem even less trustworthy...

I hear that frequently yet no one ever cites specifics.

Therefore, please cite specific instances where Sony has given NEX owners reason to not trust them. Extend that look to any Sony still camera system if you must.

It trust is such a problem it should be easy to compile a huge list.

Any company that makes things make them for a profit. So where is the element of "trust" creeping in? There is no contract between Sony and its customers other than that they make a camera (any camera they choose to make) and the user likes it and buys it. The user can trust that it is well made and does its job. End of story.

If the cameras fail to be appreciated for any reason then people simply don't buy them - that is the customer's prerogative. The consumer might not buy every camera Sony choses to make as they reserve the right to like it or not like it without any accusation of consumer untrustworthiness. But Sony can choose to make or not make any product - that is their right and it is 100% profit driven, no lack of trust there.

"Lack of trust" seems to imply saying one thing and doing another. But if it is a question of not saying whether they will make more NEX models - that is their business not the consumers.

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Tom Caldwell

Tom

When you buy into an SLR or mirrorless system you are not buying an individual camera, you are buying a system. The more lenses and accessories you buy (which is what the manufacturers want you to do) the more you find yourself commited to that system. This is very different from buying an individual item like a P&S camera or a television which will pretty much exist on its own and can easily be replaced by another item from a different manufacturer when the time comes

It is true that there is no legal contract, but there is an implicit relationship that the camera system customer has with that manufacturer that the manufacturer will continue to make the sort of cameras that the user bought into the system with so that they can continue to use the lenses and accessories that they bought, into the future

For a manufacturer to not do that is effectively a breach of trust (not legal, but personal). Of course the manufacturer can do whatever they want, but they cannot then expect anybody sensible to buy their system equipment if there is the very real probability that the future system equipment will be almost unrecognisable from the current equipment

This is the question of trust...

Yes I can agree with that.  However in reality the consumer can only believe what he or she is actually told.  The A7 system is a case in point - released with just a few lenses but promises of more.  Now they have made a commitment to expand this system with more FE lenses and not to do so would be a breach of consumer trust.

However implied trust is harder.  Those that bought into the NEX system have had a good number of camera bodies and accessories including a number of aps-c capable lenses.  If Sony has announced more equipment for the NEX system then not to provide it would be to renege on consumer trust.  However not to announce where they are heading with the future NEX-type products is not a breach of trust if they have already made every componnent that their implied contract with the consumer has foreshadowed.

The NEX system is already "a system" and if its future is curtailed for any reason I don't think that this is any breach of trust..

However my guess is that the NEX system will continue but at Sony's discretion and on the basis that they think it a profitable course of action not because their customers trust them to do so.  On the other hand the same consumers will either buy or not buy at their absolute discretion with no recourse to their trustworthiness  to always buy whatever Sony might choose to make.

One might allude trust in a system to Ricoh's disappearing GXR rail mount system.  A good idea seemingly no longer happening.  But Ricoh did (eventually) make all the mount modules that they foreshadowed. So do Ricoh fanatics trust Ricoh because the GXR system seems dead?  What they did make is excellent for the purpose and the M mount module is destined to become a classic combination.

This seems the very parallel of where the NEX system is a present date.  Common sense says it should continue but Sony is not saying a lot, at least they have foreshadowed another model in the new year (or so I believe).  As far as I am concerned I can use my NEX6 or GXR-M interchangeably for the benefits each give me and their performance has not diminished since I bought them.  They are part of the same system as far as I am concerned because my legacy lenses give me the freedom to mix and match the host camera bodies.  If neither Sony nor Ricoh deliver the camera body that might replace my present shutter squeezes when need to do so then I am not limited by brand for my camera body.  I suppose that my system is my versatile MF lenses and therefore I need no longer have to trust a manufacturer to keep making (say) aps-c camera bodies to match my aps-c image circle lenses.

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Tom Caldwell

Tom Caldwell Forum Pro • Posts: 31,676
Re: Stop reading the doom and gloom posts?

parallaxproblem wrote:

sroute wrote:

UnderDriven wrote:
Sony customers have a lot of angst because they don't trust Sony. Sony either doesn't realize this, or they don't care--either way, it makes them seem even less trustworthy...

I hear that frequently yet no one ever cites specifics.

Therefore, please cite specific instances where Sony has given NEX owners reason to not trust them. Extend that look to any Sony still camera system if you must.

It trust is such a problem it should be easy to compile a huge list.

A-mount
1. A700 owners waited 4 years before the upgraded A77 replacement finally arrived, abandoning high-end APS-C fans during this time and creating much frustration

2. A900/A850 were released and then that sector was seemingly abandoned for 4 years until the A99 was released. This created and then almost immediately abandoned the 'pro' sector. Only one firmware was released for A900 during this time and the JPEG engine remained (and remains) sub-standard and there are many other annoyances, even though a fix in firmware would probably have been possible

3. Sony suddenly stopped making OVF cameras and concentrated on SLT cameras without warning, abandoning OVF fans and again creating much frustration

4. Sony dropped the Minolta flash mount to make the cameras more appealing to new users. They released an adaptor but it is substandard and does not lock properly on the mount so is hated by most users. This has created an enormous amount of bad feeling in the A-mount community

5. Now Sony appear to be retreating from the low/mid A-mount camera range and returning to the high-end that they previously abandoned... again creating confusion and bad feeling amongst their A-mount customers

I am seeing big price drops in second-hand A-mount gear at the moment

E-mount
Never released the range pancake lenses that the system was crying out for and instead released lot of versions of the 18-200 lens because they thought we *ought* to be buying it

Poor QC on the lenses and a refusal to repair or replace lemons (at least in my case)

No official comment on what the dropping of the NEX brand name means for current NEX system customers

Sony don't seem to give a damn about their existing customers and are only interested in selling into new market sectors

Now I understand.

An electronic goods manufacturer with brilliant engineers driven by marketing....

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Tom Caldwell

UnderDriven
UnderDriven Senior Member • Posts: 1,089
Re: Stop reading the doom and gloom posts?

sroute wrote:

Therefore, please cite specific instances where Sony has given NEX owners reason to not trust them. Extend that look to any Sony still camera system if you must.

I did not mean that Sony has done anything specific to make NEX users distrust Sony. What I meant is that Sony users don't trust Sony in general. My reasons are:

A-mount users didn't trust Sony when they took over Minolta because Sony was not a "camera company". Users were concerned that Sony did not understand the camera business, and more specifically that Sony did not understand what it would take to make A-mount competitive with Canon and Nikon. To some extent this is true (IMO), and this basic mistrust has persisted.

Sony promised to develop A-mount into a system that would be competitive with (or better than) Canon and Nikon when they said their goal was at least equal market share. However, when A-mount was not doing as well as Sony hoped they put their resources into another system (NEX) instead of A-mount. While A-mount has not been dropped (as feared by Minolta users when Sony took over), NEX has taken resources away from A-mount. Now APS-C E-mount users are facing the same situation. Although APS-C E-mount has been successful, it appears that FF E-mount may be even more popular--thus APS-C E-mount users are concerned that FF E-mount will get all the resources and APS-C E-mount will be ignored. This is likely in the near term at least, since FF E-mount is desperately in need of lenses.

It's also difficult to trust Sony because no one knows what they will do next. Sony has been flailing around since they took over Minolta, trying to find some way to get market share. A-mount, FF A-mount, SLT A-mount, NEX, FF E-mount--these are all the things Sony has tried in the last 7 years (and now it appears that Sony is dropping SLT A-mount, if the rumor sites are correct). I'll grant that some impressive innovation has occurred along the way, but people are concerned that there is no plan...

Don't get me wrong--I'm not saying that people should mistrust Sony. Only that Sony didn't start out with a lot of trust and their 'strategy' has not built much trust since then. IMO Sony should have made the commitment to make A-mount into a world-class system at the start. Instead, they were too focused on camera bodies--and not focused enough on the system as a whole: lenses, flash, quality control (including a longer warranty), and support (including more firmware updates). A camera system is only as strong as its weakest component--a great camera body isn't enough, especially when Canon and Nikon will put out a similar model within the year. We're not talking about a Walkman here, we're talking about a system in which people invest thousands of dollars over many years (perhaps even their whole lifetime). I just don't know if Sony understands this business model--which was the basic concern when Sony took over Minolta...

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UnderDriven
UnderDriven Senior Member • Posts: 1,089
Re: Stop reading the doom and gloom posts?

aSevenArr wrote:

Guaranteeing that your purchase would never become obsolete would be the same thing as committing a kind of corporate suicide.

Never is a long time. No one is saying that products should be guaranteed forever. But Sony has been trying many different approaches over the last 7 years, and each new one takes resources away from the others. When people have invested thousands of dollars in a system, they are naturally concerned...

It is precisely because Sony continues to innovate in these ways that we get these excellent and exciting new game changing products like the A7 and the A7r.

Yes, but it is also possible to say that Sony has no plan. If you keep innovating to the point where you alienate your loyal customers you may not be in business very long...

What if you invested $5,000 in FF E-mount and Sony decided to do something else. Would you be so quick to applaud Sony's innovation then?

If you want a warm fuzzy "business as usual" approach then go with Nikon instead and spend $$$$$ for minor and conservative upgrades.

I'm not saying that Sony shouldn't innovate, but too much change in too short a time may be excessive (and may worry users). Nikon may be on the other side of the 'optimum' innovation vs. conservative balance (if there is an optimum). But Nikon users are not worried that F-mount is going away...

If the camera business is going to survive they must innovate with the times and provide exciting and compelling new products.

I think Sony could have made A-mount a greater success if they had been willing to invest enough in it. But it appears they thought that a new camera body was enough to make Canikon users abandon their systems. Sony needed to make the A-mount system better than the Canon and Nikon systems to have a hope of gaining market share. That they didn't realize that is a concern. We'll see if they have learned their lesson with FF E-mount--although here they have no other system to compete with (for now), so perhaps they can afford to do as they please...

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UnderDriven
UnderDriven Senior Member • Posts: 1,089
Re: Stop reading the doom and gloom posts?

Good points! I forgot some of those when I made my reply...

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“The world is going to pieces and people like Adams and Weston are photographing rocks!” --Henri Cartier-Bresson

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twenty200
twenty200 Contributing Member • Posts: 685
Re: Will my NEX go the same way as my R1?

NEX isn't gone.  The name NEX is gone.  The fact that Sony made the A7 using the same mount seems to suggest to me that they're committed to NEX, except they decided the Alpha name carries more weight than the NEX name.  So...  there will be future NEX cameras, but they won't be named NEX.  They'll be named Alpha.  Frankly, I think that's a stupid decision since it makes the mount situation confusing.  I think using a different name for each mount made more sense.  I'd have named the A7 something like a P7 instead.  P, as in, NEX Pro.  Or name it the F7, as in NEX Full Frame.  A7 sounds like a good name, as far as branding goes, but it's going to lead to consumer confusion since there are now going to be FOUR different kinds of Alpha lens types: E crop, E full, A crop and A full...  except some A cameras use E lenses.  I love Sony cameras, but sheeeeeeeeeeeesh, that's a bad naming system.

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Olympus E-M1 Olympus PEN-F Panasonic Lumix G Fisheye 8mm F3.5 Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 25mm F1.8 +4 more
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