Cancelled my E-M1 order

Started Sep 26, 2013 | Discussions
boggis the cat Veteran Member • Posts: 6,324
Quoting out of context is misleading

Raist3d wrote:

Just when did you jump into 4/3rds? With the E-5? The E-3?

The E-510 twin lens kit, in preference to Pentax, Nikon and Canon (all APS-C) in that order.  Mainly for the better quality 'kit lenses', but also the build quality and feature set.

Size was not much of a consideration, but I do expect a certain amount of trade-off for smaller size.

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erichK Veteran Member • Posts: 5,675
Re: Charles, and I agree

Marty4650 wrote:

All those things Steve listed really are improvements.

But are they enough of an improvement to justify spending $1400 to replace a camera you recently paid $1000 for?

It just depends on you and your circumstance. If you want to use 4/3 PDAF lenses then that could be the best possible reason to spend the money.

Since I have a half dozen HG and two SHG and the Panaleica 25/ 1.4, the better focusing with those and the better grip and less fiddly buttons would be enough to justify the purchase.  The VF, IBIS and other improvements make it even better.

Nevertheless, I will wait until Christmas in hope of some kit pricing on the new zoom and the grip.

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erichK
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Roger Engelken
Roger Engelken Veteran Member • Posts: 5,053
Re: You should have just had them send it to me instead...

aja2 wrote:

silly man.

Unfortunately, you did not sit for an interview with an obscure internet publication.  

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Sergey_Green
Sergey_Green Forum Pro • Posts: 10,628
Not true ..

boggis the cat wrote:

You need to understand that the second part you emphasise goes with the first part: "... maximizes the image sensor performance to ensure outstanding image quality while also being smaller than 35 mm film SLR camera lens systems."

They all maximize image sensor performance, 35 or smaller, what is your point here?


Size size size. They lost the plot with the SHG and E-3.

No, they didn't. The SHG lenses are smaller than equivalent EFL lenses on 135 (much smaller) and also a stop faster.

From the trio, 14-35/2 is not smaller or lighter than say Nikon 24-70/2.8. And note, it is not 24-70/4, it is an f/2.8. Just like 14-35/2 is not an f/1.4 lens either, which it should have been to be equivalent.

Same goes for 35-100/2, it is bigger and heavier than again Nikon 70-200/2.8. Luckily there is an equivalent on the other side, 70-200/4, which turns out to be smaller, half the weight, half the price, and at least with the same or better output.

I did not miss 7-14/4 (from the three) as there is simply no equivalent f/8 FF lens for it. The f/2.8 is way beyond the f/8 comparison. And the difference in weight is not that great still.

This provides an option for people who want a system that can yield a different size to performance ratio -- an optimisation based on designing an entirely new system.

Notice how they are *NOT* doing F2.0 zoom lenses with m4/3rds.

The 'PRO' line so far has two constant f/2.8 lenses.

But they are *NOT* f/2.0 zoom lenses.

..

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- sergey

Marathonianbull
Marathonianbull Contributing Member • Posts: 579
Re: Cancelled my E-M1 order
3

Based on your interpretation of Mr. Terada's m4/3 logic, I have firmly decided to buy the whole glittering E-M1 / 12-40mm kit with the renewed hope of attracting loads of young, pretty girls. Thanks for the tips!

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rovingtim Veteran Member • Posts: 8,640
Indeed: Selective reading fail
1

boggis the cat wrote:

You need to understand that the second part you emphasise goes with the first part: "... maximizes the image sensor performance to ensure outstanding image quality while also being smaller than 35 mm film SLR camera lens systems."

Then why did Olympus say this to Darrell while talking about the EM1 ... which has better IQ than any previous 4/3rds camera?

Olympus says if you need absolute image quality or more megapixels then FF is better,

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52240637

You are doing a good imitation of someone reading what you want to read in order to have the reality you want to have.

By the way, greetings to Boggis' thumbs up brigade I'm sure you are all just as open minded as he is.

Sergey_Green
Sergey_Green Forum Pro • Posts: 10,628
Renewed hope ..

Marathonianbull wrote:

Based on your interpretation of Mr. Terada's m4/3 logic, I have firmly decided to buy the whole glittering E-M1 / 12-40mm kit with the renewed hope of attracting loads of young, pretty girls. Thanks for the tips!

You mean to say they will think you are one of them ? Not sure this is a good way of attracting.

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- sergey

aja2
aja2 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,657
Darn it...

Roger Engelken wrote:

aja2 wrote:

silly man.

Unfortunately, you did not sit for an interview with an obscure internet publication.

I just knewI was forgetting something! Guess I was too busy working out a deal for an E-30 to care.

sderdiarian Veteran Member • Posts: 4,229
Re: No, it never was

boggis the cat wrote:

sderdiarian wrote:

Macx wrote:

In the 500- and 400-series Olympus had a much easier sell in that here was a palpable advantage for the user from using a smaller sensor: A smaller camera. I think Olympus is right in thinking that the "full size" lenses and cameras was a disadvantage to them in the marketplace.

Yes, and they desperately need a full-featured body to play in this class now. With their range of small lenses, it could compete very well with the D5200, giving consumers a true choice that should go Olympus' way on convenience alone.

I don't expect any more DSLRs from Olympus.

That's what I was saying, or trying to, since apparently it didn't come across: Olympus has long needed a full-featured consumer grade mFT body, and now such a camera, if they produce it, will likely benefit from any of the features and improvements in the E-M1. That's SOP for Olympus.  And, yes, Olympus is done with DSLR's, no argument there.

What will happen, however, is that the E-M1 sensor will be 'inherited' by low-priced MicroFT bodies, so you could buy an E-PLx or E-PMx in future to use with any old SG lenses you have.

Yes, but that's not what many want.  Those in the D5200 price range (and formerly E-xxx price range) want a full-featured mFT body done the Olympus way (i.e., Olympus colors and not an oversized Panny body).

That's not saying that nobody wanted that size lenses and bodies for 4:3. That would be demonstrably false, but I think the direction Olympus is going with their micro four-thirds is the right one: You can go tiny, and you can go larger, and the E-M1 with grip is still a substantial camera even if it's still smaller than a lot of DSLRs. I definitely see it as a spiritual successor to the E-1 that I fell in love with. It lacks the OVF, but the EVF has its clear advantages too.

I see it more as the E-xxx on steroids that many of us were asking for back in the day of 4/3's. As others have pointed out, the E-M1 is almost identical to the E-620 in height, width and weight, but adds in weathersealing, a modern sensor, the E-510 grip for larger lenses and finally access to some great compact primes. In many ways a perfect camera provided you're willing to pay the premium (which I feel is $200 too high, but whatever).

It is way higher specified across the board. The only similarity is the size and weight, and even then the E-M1 has a more substantive grip.

What I was saying is a body of that size but with all current advancements, i.e., the "on steroids" and "perfect camera" statements.  This would of course now be an mFT.

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Sailin' Steve

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sderdiarian Veteran Member • Posts: 4,229
Re: Charles, and I agree

brianric wrote:

sderdiarian wrote:

Tough act to follow, and at $1400, well I'm just not going there (E-M1) at this time. I'll wait for either the E-M1 to become affordable or Olympus to come out with a less expensive body with many of the same features, which I think is inevitable given the competition.

For someone who does not have an E-M5, the E-M1 makes a compelling reason to acquire one over the E-M5.

Completely agree, for those like Charles and it appears yourself who have much invested in HG/SHG lenses, the E-M1 is a god send. And for those just entering mFT at the $1000+ range, the E-M1 also has appeal, although the GX7 would then catch my eye, as would soon to be increasingly discounted (my guess) E-M5's.

We'll see how the E-M1 does in the market at the price they've set for it.  It appears off to a strong start based on pre-orders, we'll see if this holds up.

And even if it doesn't, Olympus may be happy simply using it as their new flagship camera soon to be followed by a revamped E-M5 and a lower tier consumer grade full-featured body.  Those would make many people happy I think.

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Sailin' Steve

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Raist3d Forum Pro • Posts: 36,392
Selective? Straightforward reading fail on you
2

boggis the cat wrote:

Raist3d wrote:

Here, from the past, an official Olympus press release:

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2002/9/24/olydak43inch

"4/3-Inch Image Sensor Size

The Four Thirds System uses a 4/3-type CCD or other image sensor, and will facilitate the development of dedicated digital camera lens systems that maximizes the image sensor performance to ensure outstanding image quality while also being smaller than 35 mm film SLR camera lens systems."

(emphasis mine). This was one of the Unique Selling Propositions.

You need to understand that the second part you emphasise goes with the first part: "... maximizes the image sensor performance to ensure outstanding image quality while also being smaller than 35 mm film SLR camera lens systems."

I understand that. What you seem to fail to grasp is that it is indeed a valid USP. Yes it goes with the former, but it is PART of it.  It is RIGHT THERE.  I can't believe you are missing it from what seems to be a rather stubborn attitude to simply admit "I was wrong."

"Benefits

The major benefit of Four Thirds System is that it will allow the design of dedicated, high-performance digital camera lens systems that are more compact than their 35 mm film SLR camera lens counterparts. The impact of the more compact lens size will be especially marked on telephoto lenses"

(emphasis mine).

Again, look at the entire sentence.

I did and I do.  It is RIGHT THERE that it is talking about high performance *AND* size. Size is a *key part* of it.  It is *RIGHT THERE*.   The brick is hitting you in the face and you are still missing it.

Amazing.

This is a 2001 OLYMPUS (joint with Kodak) Press release announcing the 4/3rds system.

Size size size. They lost the plot with the SHG and E-3.

No, they didn't. The SHG lenses are smaller than equivalent EFL lenses on 135 (much smaller) and also a stop faster.

Not so.

This provides an option for people who want a system that can yield a different size to performance ratio -- an optimisation based on designing an entirely new system.

Not the SHG zooms.

Notice how they are *NOT* doing F2.0 zoom lenses with m4/3rds.

The 'PRO' line so far has two constant f/2.8 lenses. Smaller than equivalent EFL lenses for 135 and APS-C, and it appears that they will perform better as well.

Yes, but that's not what I said (in fact you mentioning they are smaller in m4/3rds proves my point about size being important) - I said they are NOT doing F2.0 zoom lenses with m4/3rds.  I don't know why you decided to argue it. You just repeated and re-asserted the fact they have not.

Olympus could always release a "TOP PRO" line later if they believe it is required (smaller and cheaper than SHG, given reliance on software correction and technical advances made in the interim), but in the meantime the existing f/2 SHG zooms can be used.

Actually what Olympus is saying so far is that the new Pro line "is it."

It is interesting that Sigma have started producing f/1.8 zooms for APS-C and Fufifilm are making fast zooms for their "X" system. Would you argue that this is a mistake?

What FuiFilm X system zoom is F2.8 or F2.0 constant? Oh, not a single one.  Sigma made a move that nobody else has done, and it has a limited zoom range. But this is not about Sigma or Fuji- they can bring whatever they want. It's about Olympus and what I said on their size as part of their unique selling proposition.  Don't confuse things, these are completely separate points.

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Raist3d Forum Pro • Posts: 36,392
I am not- but apparently you can't read

Here- where exactly am I quoting out of context?

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52241257

boggis the cat wrote:

Raist3d wrote:

Just when did you jump into 4/3rds? With the E-5? The E-3?

The E-510 twin lens kit, in preference to Pentax, Nikon and Canon (all APS-C) in that order. Mainly for the better quality 'kit lenses', but also the build quality and feature set.

Small wonder then you don't know what you are talking about. Look at what Olympus said when they announced 4/3rds.

Size was not much of a consideration, but I do expect a certain amount of trade-off for smaller size.

Yes, but that's irrelevant to the point. Look at what Olympus said when they announced 4/3rds.  Obviously you were late to the party and you don't seem to know what they talked about.

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light_bulb Contributing Member • Posts: 834
Re: Cancelled my E-M1 order
1

dahod wrote:

I got caught up in the hype around the E-M1 - what wasn't to like? - generally favourable reviews, new lenses on the horizon, ability to use my old 4/3 lenses, commitment to m4/3 by Olympus as its future etc etc. At last - Olympus breaks their silence and the world is good.

I read the interview with Mr. Terada (http://www.bestmirrorlesscamerareviews.com/2013/09/18/the-om-d-e-m1-new-pro-lenses-and-2014-an-interview-with-olympus-europe/) however, and it left me with a less than warm and fuzzy feeling. I could be reading it wrong and I apologize if I am but my take from it was

...

Thanks

Dave

Hi Dave,

Seems to be that you have difficulties in getting your facts right before placing and cancelling orders.

Have you had a look at the latest weather report to see how that might affect your decision?

Honestly, people are growing older on average not only in Japan but also in other parts of the world. Most photograhy enthusiasts are much less enthusiastic in schlepping a full load of full frame gear. While I currently use a Nikon D800 for the most of it, I pretty well know what I am talking about.

This was one of the reasons I kept all my FT lenses with the E-5: To have a full-fledged set of gear available that will not break my back.

The E-M1 seems to be a perfect solution for this:

- AF-issues with FT glas resolved in the way I expected it.

- Less weight than the E-5.

- On-eye-AF feature for low DOF-shots that you will not find with the competition (and I have used the D800 AFS 85 1.8 G and the E-M5 45 1.8 side by side to see the difference this makes).

- Fantastic IBIS system most of the competition does not offer that benefits all lenses regardless how old they are.

- No more difference in image quality at least compared to APS-C DSLR.

- etc.

The German magazine Fotomagazin just concluded giving it a "Super" verdict it hardly ever does for cameras.

So, what about your order?

windsprite
windsprite Senior Member • Posts: 2,484
Re: Cancelled my E-M1 order
1

GBC wrote:

I just get the feeling that he failed to verbalize his thinking as eloquently as he could have if speaking Japanese.

If you really understood how he felt, instead of reading into what he said over dinner in a second language and paraphrased for a blog, it would no longer be an excuse to cancel a preorder and post here about it.

As far as basing purchasing decisions on such an interview, that's a personal decision that I don't necessarily agree with, and I think there are things about the E-M1 and the system in general that will appeal to people other than young female Japanese.

That said, I've lived in Japan for more years than I care to admit, and I've been reading Olympus interviews in both languages for quite some time as well, and I can't imagine Mr. Terada would give an interview in English if he was afraid of goofing up their message entirely, and I don't think he said anything radically different in this interview from what Oly execs have been saying all along, as far as marketing to women. Google dpreview.com and "camera joshi ( = "camera girls").

Julie

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windsprite
windsprite Senior Member • Posts: 2,484
Re: Cancelled my E-M1 order

PC Wheeler wrote:

dahod wrote:

I read the interview with Mr. Terada (http://www.bestmirrorlesscamerareviews.com/2013/09/18/the-om-d-e-m1-new-pro-lenses-and-2014-an-interview-with-olympus-europe/) however, and it left me with a less than warm and fuzzy feeling. I could be reading it wrong and I apologize if I am but my take from it was

  1. 4/3 was a failure because it didn't result in measurably smaller camera/lens combinations - M4/3 will correct that.
  2. His target market is the "young generation with a focus on young females"
  3. He can't figure out how to attract European women buyers but he has a couple of thoughts.

Lower price might help! These days the younger generation, male and female, seems to have problems finding well-paying jobs. Maybe his target is young females with good inheritances

Unmarried Japanese women (and men) often live with their parents, even well into their thirties and forties, and they're not expected to contribute much to the household finances, which means they have a lot of disposable income.  This isn't the case with all young Japanese, of course, but it's much more common and accepted than in western countries.

Julie

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CharlesB58 Veteran Member • Posts: 8,460
Re: Charles, and I agree
1

sderdiarian wrote:

Marty4650 wrote:

If you want to use 4/3 PDAF lenses then that could be the best possible reason to spend the money. The better LCD screen, much better EVF, higher shutter speed, focus peaking, etc, are ALL nice to have, but not really necessary for many of us.

The real problem for Olympus in upgrading the EM5 is... the EM5 is still very near the top of it's class. Eventually, we will get something better, but it will have to be a lot better to get me to part with $1400. There are lenses I would rather buy instead!

-- hide signature --

Marty
Olympus E-30, Olympus E-PL2, Olympus OM-D, Sony SLT-A55

Yes, Olympus did too good of a job on the E-M5, likely due to their having a near-death experience at the time due to the scandal. They had to come out with a great camera, or I seriously think they would have been kaput, and the E-M5 pulled them out of that dive, both in terms of corporate image and sales.

Here it is 1 1/2 years later, and it's become something of a legend in mFT circles, the little camera that could. I've had mine for almost a year and I still absolutely love it, it's simply so far ahead of my E-620 and E-510 in IQ and features, two cameras I also loved dearly.

Tough act to follow, and at $1400, well I'm just not going there (E-M1) at this time. I'll wait for either the E-M1 to become affordable or Olympus to come out with a less expensive body with many of the same features, which I think is inevitable given the competition.

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Sailin' Steve

OM-2S, E-510, E-620, E-PM1, E-M5

The experience with the EM5 vs the EM1 is not dissimilar too what Nikon encountered with the D300. When it came out, that camera had such a compelling set of features and performance that a lot of people opted out of buying the flagship and went with what Nikon considered a "prosumer" camera. This has happened throughout the history of "System Cameras".  In the 70's, 80's and 90's, some pros opted for cameras such as the Canon A-1 or T90 over the Canon F1, with similar occurrences with Nikon.

What we witness on forums like this is people assume that Olympus overpriced a camera that they assume is a replacement for the EM5, or the camera every EM5 owner should feel compelled to upgrade to. That's not the case, and anyone who really thinks things through needs to consider a couple of things.

First, features and tech almost always "leapfrog" a given model tier. Why does the Canon 70D have features that some would feel make the 7D superfluous for the cost (or in Nikon it would be the D7100 vs the D300s). Or alternately, leaving off features and quality of build is another way of producing two cameras that seem almost equal in primary features (6D vs 5D3 or D600 vs D800).

That's why I say individual mileage may vary. For me, even if I owned the EM5, the EM1 is worth the money because of the focus with 4/3 lenses I would get a lot of use out of; focus peaking; improved IBIS; wifi capability; ergonomics. For some, those don't add up to an extra $400 USD. For me they do, as they will all contribute to a preferred working method over what the EM5 has to offer.

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CharlesB58 Veteran Member • Posts: 8,460
Re: Charles, and I agree

sderdiarian wrote:

brianric wrote:

sderdiarian wrote:

Tough act to follow, and at $1400, well I'm just not going there (E-M1) at this time. I'll wait for either the E-M1 to become affordable or Olympus to come out with a less expensive body with many of the same features, which I think is inevitable given the competition.

For someone who does not have an E-M5, the E-M1 makes a compelling reason to acquire one over the E-M5.

Completely agree, for those like Charles and it appears yourself who have much invested in HG/SHG lenses, the E-M1 is a god send. And for those just entering mFT at the $1000+ range, the E-M1 also has appeal, although the GX7 would then catch my eye, as would soon to be increasingly discounted (my guess) E-M5's.

We'll see how the E-M1 does in the market at the price they've set for it. It appears off to a strong start based on pre-orders, we'll see if this holds up.

And even if it doesn't, Olympus may be happy simply using it as their new flagship camera soon to be followed by a revamped E-M5 and a lower tier consumer grade full-featured body. Those would make many people happy I think.

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Sailin' Steve

It's also about timing. The EM5 has been out long enough to likely have recouped R&D and start up costs. Now it can be sold at a discount. Enter the EM1, priced higher with features that those who really, honestly can justify a pro camera, along with those who prefer certain features, might grind teeth at paying but as preorders show will do so anyway.

A win situation for the EM5 now: Olympus can afford to reduce the price a bit and then see how the presence of the EM1 affects sales. A few ways: the presence of a flagship OMD model will get some people thinking that the OMD line is now worth investing in because there are always those who are drawn to the siren song of "pro system". The lower price will tempt those who thought the $1000 mark for the EM5 was too high. Reducing the price of the EM5, together with the presence of the EM1, may induce people who are leaning toward lower end DSLRs to buy the EM5.

Sure, much of this is gamble and speculation on the part of Olympus, but that's the nature of the business. Look at how much Canon must have invested in the EOS-M, and what has happened to that camera in the US and European markets.

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babalu Regular Member • Posts: 325
Re: Yep-less than impressive interview

GBC wrote:

Of topic I know, but your Sig doesn't make sense.

I understand binary, and there are 4 possible outcomes with a 2 bit number.

00  =  00

01  =  01

10  =  02

11  =  03

so,  10 = 2, and the signature makes all the sense in the world.

brianric Veteran Member • Posts: 7,145
Re: Charles, and I agree

CharlesB58 wrote:

sderdiarian wrote:

Marty4650 wrote:

If you want to use 4/3 PDAF lenses then that could be the best possible reason to spend the money. The better LCD screen, much better EVF, higher shutter speed, focus peaking, etc, are ALL nice to have, but not really necessary for many of us.

The real problem for Olympus in upgrading the EM5 is... the EM5 is still very near the top of it's class. Eventually, we will get something better, but it will have to be a lot better to get me to part with $1400. There are lenses I would rather buy instead!

-- hide signature --

Marty
Olympus E-30, Olympus E-PL2, Olympus OM-D, Sony SLT-A55

Yes, Olympus did too good of a job on the E-M5, likely due to their having a near-death experience at the time due to the scandal. They had to come out with a great camera, or I seriously think they would have been kaput, and the E-M5 pulled them out of that dive, both in terms of corporate image and sales.

Here it is 1 1/2 years later, and it's become something of a legend in mFT circles, the little camera that could. I've had mine for almost a year and I still absolutely love it, it's simply so far ahead of my E-620 and E-510 in IQ and features, two cameras I also loved dearly.

Tough act to follow, and at $1400, well I'm just not going there (E-M1) at this time. I'll wait for either the E-M1 to become affordable or Olympus to come out with a less expensive body with many of the same features, which I think is inevitable given the competition.

-- hide signature --

Sailin' Steve

OM-2S, E-510, E-620, E-PM1, E-M5

The experience with the EM5 vs the EM1 is not dissimilar too what Nikon encountered with the D300. When it came out, that camera had such a compelling set of features and performance that a lot of people opted out of buying the flagship and went with what Nikon considered a "prosumer" camera. This has happened throughout the history of "System Cameras". In the 70's, 80's and 90's, some pros opted for cameras such as the Canon A-1 or T90 over the Canon F1, with similar occurrences with Nikon.

What we witness on forums like this is people assume that Olympus overpriced a camera that they assume is a replacement for the EM5, or the camera every EM5 owner should feel compelled to upgrade to. That's not the case, and anyone who really thinks things through needs to consider a couple of things.

First, features and tech almost always "leapfrog" a given model tier. Why does the Canon 70D have features that some would feel make the 7D superfluous for the cost (or in Nikon it would be the D7100 vs the D300s). Or alternately, leaving off features and quality of build is another way of producing two cameras that seem almost equal in primary features (6D vs 5D3 or D600 vs D800).

That's why I say individual mileage may vary. For me, even if I owned the EM5, the EM1 is worth the money because of the focus with 4/3 lenses I would get a lot of use out of; focus peaking; improved IBIS; wifi capability; ergonomics. For some, those don't add up to an extra $400 USD. For me they do, as they will all contribute to a preferred working method over what the EM5 has to offer.

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Nikon arrogance in not coming out with a timely replacement for the D300S could end up biting themselves in the ass. I see an exodus of Nikon users to Olympus If the M1 is capable of focusing in action shots and Nikon keeps delaying the replacement of the D300S. At the time of my switchover from Canon to Nikon I had four Canon DSLRs (30D, 5D, 1dMkIIN, 1DMkIII and 12 "L" series lenses. When Canon came out with the 5DMkII with the same crappy focusing system of the 5D I bought a D700. Three months later, having love the D700 I bought a second D700 and unloaded all my Canon equipment. Now I'm looking at a much lighter system that can handle action. If the M-1 can handle my needs, half my Nikon FF cameras along with a couple lenses will be gone.

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erichK Veteran Member • Posts: 5,675
Re: Cancelled my E-M1 order

light_bulb wrote:

dahod wrote:

I got caught up in the hype around the E-M1 - what wasn't to like? - generally favourable reviews, new lenses on the horizon, ability to use my old 4/3 lenses, commitment to m4/3 by Olympus as its future etc etc. At last - Olympus breaks their silence and the world is good.

I read the interview with Mr. Terada (http://www.bestmirrorlesscamerareviews.com/2013/09/18/the-om-d-e-m1-new-pro-lenses-and-2014-an-interview-with-olympus-europe/) however, and it left me with a less than warm and fuzzy feeling. I could be reading it wrong and I apologize if I am but my take from it was

...

Thanks

Dave

Hi Dave,

Seems to be that you have difficulties in getting your facts right before placing and cancelling orders.

Have you had a look at the latest weather report to see how that might affect your decision?

Honestly, people are growing older on average not only in Japan but also in other parts of the world. Most photograhy enthusiasts are much less enthusiastic in schlepping a full load of full frame gear. While I currently use a Nikon D800 for the most of it, I pretty well know what I am talking about.

This was one of the reasons I kept all my FT lenses with the E-5: To have a full-fledged set of gear available that will not break my back.

The E-M1 seems to be a perfect solution for this:

- AF-issues with FT glas resolved in the way I expected it.

- Less weight than the E-5.

- On-eye-AF feature for low DOF-shots that you will not find with the competition (and I have used the D800 AFS 85 1.8 G and the E-M5 45 1.8 side by side to see the difference this makes).

- Fantastic IBIS system most of the competition does not offer that benefits all lenses regardless how old they are.

- No more difference in image quality at least compared to APS-C DSLR.

- etc.

The German magazine Fotomagazin just concluded giving it a "Super" verdict it hardly ever does for cameras.

So, what about your order?

While the EM-1 is not perfect:

- needs a second capable-of-parallel/back-up card slot

- needs a larger/longer-lasting battery, at least for the grip

- needs focus-confirmation with non-electronically-linked lenses

etcetera...

It likely offers more, in a weatherproof, tough, small, but ergonomically-optimized (grip, button and dial spacing package), than many of us - especially those with many FT lenses- dared to hope for at a price that is higher than hoped, but lower than feared.

Whatever Terada may have said or thought of mispoken - and most of what he said was refreshingly candid - Olympus made some very sensible decisions with this camera. For example, had they chosen to produce the E-7 many wanted instead, how would those of us who love the 12/2 and 75 and 45 1.8 felt about not being able to use those terrific lenses, even if they'd used the E-1 style body so many of us crave.

In the real world, all cameras are a compromise.  At least all those I care to buy or carry out of a studio or a fixed shoot. The EM-1 seems to be the best such to date.

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erichK
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