Win8 vs Win7

Started Jun 10, 2013 | Discussions
theswede
theswede Veteran Member • Posts: 4,006
Re: stick with Win 7 if possible...
3

The desktop is very similar in looks and functionality as 7. As for the metro apps and the new Start screen, it's very easy to get rid of a Metro app (see below for how).

The start screen is a Metro app. I will appreciate the information on how to get rid of it.

The differences are very In Your Face and crippling for engineering and science users. I normally have at least dozens of programs to access industrial systems and subsystems installed, with confusing names. In the start menu they're grouped by manufacturer name and then by task to use them for - dead easy to find what I need.

I'm in IT and I don't find it crippling at all.

And I'm an engineer juggling dozens of manufacturers, each with multiple programs to connect to different pieces of hardware. Having those on a slab of a start screen is completely useless.

Not an annoyance.

Not a bother.

Not a bit impractical.

Completely useless.

There is no way to use Windows 8 for the tasks I do every day.

The desktop works just the same. Majority of my apps are not Metro based and work in the desktop. I imagine most of the engineering and science apps are still desktop applications as well and will work no differently than they have in the past. Multiple applications open? No big deal, works just as it did in 7.

And how do you propose I find them on that start screen?

You do know that the Start Screen can be organized and grouped to your liking, right?

So I need to sit down and manually recreate the groups which the installer would do for me on Windows 7? Tell me, how do you propose I find out which software does what, so I can create the hierarchy manually? In the start menu they're already grouped by manufacturer and function so I can easily locate what I need.

Or if you know the name of them, you can quickly find it by typing a few letters on your keyboard and select it via the quick search function.

I have no idea what they're named.

You don't even have to launch a program to search, just start typing.

You mean just like in Windows 7? Wow!

You can also pin them to the task bar or create shortcuts on your desktop just like you probably were in Windows 7.

I absolutely was not. We're talking at least dozens of applications, some of which I use every week, some I use every few months, and none of which I really enjoy being reminded of exist when I don't need them for the moment.

The hierarchy of the start menu is perfect for engineering and science professional use. The amount of applications required is staggering. It's clear you (and most everyone) can't even comprehend the magnitude of this problem.

And neither can Microsoft.

That works exactly the same.

Good for a browser and Outlook. Not so good for engineering software.

It seems like your biggest beef resorts around finding and launching the application and not when it comes to actually using it. How much time do you spend launching an application? A few seconds, maybe? A little organization will make it easier for you to find things or pin the ones you frequently used, problem solved.

And that organization comes for free in Windows 7. Why should I need to manually recreate it in Windows 8? Isn't that a problem I have a computer to solve for me?

In Windows 8 they're tiled up in the start screen with no organization and no way to tell what is for what, or even from what company.

Completely useless.

As mentioned above, easy enough to find. The Start screen can be grouped and organized to your liking, and don't forget your search options too.

Grouping and organizing is a waste of my time, not to mention I have no idea what the software does when it's just sitting in a pile on the start screen. I will have to dig through documents to figure out how to group it up.

Completely worthless.

And search is even more worthless as I have no clue what the software is named. Usually it's something like WizIndraEngineering.exe or some such. Or it may be named in German or Italian.

Turned off by who? You? The user who doesn't know what they are doing? Or those wishing to run Linux distros that doesn't have a KEK?

In the computers we have purchased from Dell recently it's been about 50/50.

Ummm.....it is an OS feature, it is built in to the OS and cannot be removed. You don't open a separate program to access or use, it is integrated into the functionality of the OS.

It's a separate program launched from Explorer. If you don't believe me, try to run copy from the command line and then pause copying. There is no change at all in the underlying OS file handling functionality.

That said, it's a very good choice by Microsoft to finally include it.

The Metro interface is your Start screen and only occupies one of the monitors, leaving the others in desktop mode.

Which is a wasted monitor.

As for visual cues, how much hand holding does one need to figure out how to use it? The Apple iOS and even Android don't have much in the way of visual cues, yet I don't hear people complaining about them for the lack of.

iOS and Android have visual cues for everything which is not natural sliding motions. Windows 8 does not. Hot corners are without cue. Sliding from the top down to list running applications has no cue. Closing a Metro app has no cue. Getting rid of a Metro app has no cue.

How is handling the Metro apps confusing? They take up a full screen.

That is exactly how they are confusing.

To leave them you hit the Windows Key.

Provided you have one. My keyboard doesn't. I have no use for one.

Meanwhile they stay resident in the background (much like how Apple OS X does). If you wish to close the app, move you mouse to the top left corner of the screen to bring up your active apps and close them. Easy.

Easy, but non-obvious, and adds unnecessary cognitive load. I have no desire to memorize arcane hot corners and keys to push to get out of applications I don't even want in the first place.

I will say that Microsoft could have done more to show these new methods to the end user. Remember the welcome tutorial that would pop up in the notification area on every fresh install of Windows XP? I remember finding that so annoying, but it was useful to the first timers out there.

I know of no-one it was useful for. People learn by following visual cues or skeumorphic expectations. Not by memorizing non-obvious spots or gestures.

Task Manager received more than just a cosmetic change. If you look closer, you will see it provides loads more of useful information compared to the Task Manager in 7. It's not just another pretty face.

Which is good, but hardly anything most people get much out of.

Which is pretty much immaterial to anyone actually relying on virtual machines (like I do a lot) as they need to have dedicated VM software anyway.

How so?

Seamless mode. Dynamic resizing of guest desktops (and not just for MS OS'es). Image management. It's good that it's included (the one in Windows 7 is a joke) but it's still very bare bones.

Jesper

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Midwest Forum Pro • Posts: 17,867
Re: Win8 vs Win7
2

dradam wrote:

Midwest wrote:

gs85739az wrote:

Windows 8 will benefit those that use touch screens, mainly tablets/laptops, reaching across ALL DAY to a touch screen on a desktop will prove tiresome!

Absolutely agree. The idea that someone wants to use a keyboard, a mouse, AND touch their screen all the time is complete idiocy. Maybe a couple of foot pedals to replace the shift key and space bar will be next.

Personally, I hate having a screen full of fingerprints. On my iPad? Sure, that's the way it works, that's the nature of it. ADDING that situation on purpose where it doesn't exist already and is not needed - just to make a desktop PC act like a tablet - is just dumb.

I've been running Windows 8 for months, and have yet to feel the need to reach across my desk and touch my screen. It is completely, and totally usable with just keyboard and mouse.

Of course the whole idea behind Win 8 is to have a touch screen and then to do things by touching it. You are only using a keyboard and mouse. Is Windows 8 any better or easier to use that way than Win 7 was? I don't feel like changing the way I work with my PC to accommodate some half-baked solution to an issue I didn't have in the first place, or to work like an OS that I do not have nor want on my tablet or phone.

MS should have offered the ability to switch the UI entirely from Win 7 to Win 8 style back and forth on the PC - maybe sometimes Win 8 could be better for some things - giving the user the option to use what works best for the task at hand.

Glen Barrington
Glen Barrington Forum Pro • Posts: 19,508
YOur response explains perfectly why . . .
4

Win 8 defenders are, by and large, dilettantes who do no work of economic value on their Win 8 devices.  They are happy to  put up with the 'eccentricities' if it results in a "cool" PC experience.

Good post.

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Midwest Forum Pro • Posts: 17,867
Re: Win8 vs Win7
1

Scott Eaton wrote:
For a general desktop I stick to Win7 because Metro is annoying and *cannot* be disabled via 3rd party addons. Getting sick of hearing that.

Just what I would want, having to resort to 3rd party add-ons to get me back to where I was before my OS got 'improved'. Kind of like when people try to explain to me how an EVF's deficiencies can be worked around to be 'almost as good as' what I already have, when I am quite satisfied with my current situation.

(I do not want to get into a discussion of viewfinders here.)

If it ain't broke I don't need it fixed!

Midwest Forum Pro • Posts: 17,867
Haters?
1

dradam wrote:

1w12q312qw1 wrote:

Archer66 wrote:

Jim Cockfield wrote:

Win 7 = pretty good desktop OS

Win 8 = very bad desktop OS

Typical BS FUD from Jim Cockfield.

For desktop user Win 8 is the same as Win 7 with some improvements:

- Secure booting ( no more rootkits )

- Better file copying with enchanced dialog, you can even pause it

- Better multimonitor support

- Better taskmanager

- Better virtual machine ( Hyper V vs Virtual PC )

- Better printing ( no need to install printer drivers )

You W8 defenders sound exactly like the Microsoft sales team. Everything you list above has no bearing on my Windows7 experience speaking as an avid digital photographer. If I were shopping 8 versus staying 7 and I read your list, I'd yawn and laugh and stay with 7. Honestly, isn't that the crux of MS' problem? It just sounds like you and a few others are trying to sell the Edsel and the marketplace does NOT like the "look" of it, no matter what's under the hood.

And so many of you haters sound like there's some big man who comes to your house and makes you upgrade. The things listed above ARE improvements over 7. If you don't find them compelling enough to upgrade there is one very SIMPLE solution, just don't.

Why is someone who doesn't like something called a 'hater'? I think that's a little over the top.

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photosen Veteran Member • Posts: 5,951
Bought today, more time for updates...
1

Aka fixing the crap that should have been fixed in the first place...

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walkaround Senior Member • Posts: 2,551
Re: Win8 vs Win7
2

raymb wrote:

Not withstanding the much maligned metro interface on Win8, which can be replaced with third

party software. Are there any benefits in Win8 as an operating system that would make the switch worthwhile?.

Many thanks in advance

Ray

People who have used it or 5 minutes in a Best Buy will tell you that it's "optimized for touchscreens", "removed the Start menu", and "dumbs down Windows", but in reality all of those statements are false.

- The "Metro" start screen is an improved version of the old Start Menu. It is fully customizable, and spending a good 15 minutes ordering it the way you need it really pays off in the experience.

- In no way does navigating or doing anything in Win8 require a touchscreen. In fact, I think I'm doing more keyboard shortcuts than ever before. From the Start screen just start typing part of any application name or function and bam! the choices are searched out and given to you.

- Antivirus protection is baked into the OS.

- IE10 is very fast, and stable.

- Win8 is efficient and backwards compatible with old hardware. I have it running quite happily on a 2009 netbook with 1GB of ram, and a 1.66 GHz processor. Try running Win7 on a machine like that.

There's so much more... give it an honest try. It's an improvement in every way, I think.

Midwest Forum Pro • Posts: 17,867
Re: stick with Win 7 if possible...
2

Archer66 wrote:

theswede wrote:

Archer66 wrote:

For desktop user Win 8 is the same as Win 7 with some improvements:

It's not even remotely the same. There is no hierarchical organization of programs accessed from the start system. There is no obvious way to get rid of a Metro app which takes over the screen. There isn't even any point to Metro on a desktop system.

The differences are very In Your Face and crippling for engineering and science users. I normally have at least dozens of programs to access industrial systems and subsystems installed, with confusing names. In the start menu they're grouped by manufacturer name and then by task to use them for - dead easy to find what I need.

This was about desktop and not about Modern UI. Just pin your most used programs to taskbar or create a shortcut on your desktop just like in Win 7.

I bet most power users do not even use Win 7 start menu, there is no need for it.

I believe I more than qualify as a 'power user' and I use the start menu constantly. I am a systems analyst and have literally dozens of programs that I need to access in supporting my numerous systems, some more often than others but many every single day. I do not want to try and pick them out of a row of tiny icons in the taskbar.That is fine for opening Outlook and IE and Firefox and a couple others, but I use the start menu all day - it leads me to my programs and to various functions on my PC, which I know I can find easily that way.

Why should I accept a less convenient, more difficult way of doing my job so the easily amused can enjoy a gimmicky desktop that's like a tablet? Why should I accept workarounds that leave me behind where I was before things were 'improved'?

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VirtualMirage
VirtualMirage Veteran Member • Posts: 3,956
Re: stick with Win 7 if possible...
1

theswede wrote:

And how do you propose I find them on that start screen?

Windows Key + C, click on search. Or Windows key to get to the Start Screen, move mouse to right to bring up Charms, and select search. You will see this:

With exception to it being left to right instead of top to bottom, it is in the same hierarchy you would see in 7. If the application installation creates a Start folder, it will be under that "group" name, just like 7. The difference is that with 7 you have to view into those folders via highlighting or clicking and here it is already expanded.

The items on the far left were usually thrown at the bottom of All Programs in 7, here it is in the front since the installation programs didn't create Start folders for them.

Is that too hard? See, it isn't lost. The hierarchy is still there.

So I need to sit down and manually recreate the groups which the installer would do for me on Windows 7? Tell me, how do you propose I find out which software does what, so I can create the hierarchy manually? In the start menu they're already grouped by manufacturer and function so I can easily locate what I need.

You can and be more organized, or you can do what I showed you above and use the older layout Microsoft used. You just have more options now. While you prefer to organize by manufacturer, I prefer to organize by what they do.

I have no idea what they're named.

Sounds like then you have a problem. If you don't know what they are named, then how do you know what you are looking for.

You mean just like in Windows 7? Wow!

Wow! Sarcasm, there's a feature I have never seen before.

I absolutely was not. We're talking at least dozens of applications, some of which I use every week, some I use every few months, and none of which I really enjoy being reminded of exist when I don't need them for the moment.

The hierarchy of the start menu is perfect for engineering and science professional use. The amount of applications required is staggering. It's clear you (and most everyone) can't even comprehend the magnitude of this problem.

And neither can Microsoft.

Perfect maybe for you, but not for everybody. Again, see above on how to go back to the older hierarchy setup.

Good for a browser and Outlook. Not so good for engineering software.

Huh? So are you assuming that your apps will be full screen only in Windows 8?

And that organization comes for free in Windows 7. Why should I need to manually recreate it in Windows 8? Isn't that a problem I have a computer to solve for me?

You don't have to manually create it, you just didn't know where to look (providing you have actually used Windows 8). Manually creating your groups makes it exactly the way you see fit, not resorting to something that was forced upon you in previous iterations of the Windows OS.

Grouping and organizing is a waste of my time, not to mention I have no idea what the software does when it's just sitting in a pile on the start screen. I will have to dig through documents to figure out how to group it up.

Completely worthless.

So I take it your book shelves organize themselves too as well as everything in your house?  Or do you not have time for that either?

By dragging tiles around you can group them into columns.  Spacing it out a little further apart you will see a vertical line appear, this shows that it will create a new group.

In the bottom right hand corner of the screen there is a minus sign (-), click on that.  It will zoom the start screen out.  From here you can move whole groups of tiles.  If you wish to give your groups a name, right click the group and select the Name Group option.

And search is even more worthless as I have no clue what the software is named. Usually it's something like WizIndraEngineering.exe or some such. Or it may be named in German or Italian.

So the applications don't have names?  They only have their executable filename to go by?

In the computers we have purchased from Dell recently it's been about 50/50.

Sounds like a quality control issue, but easy enough to turn on.  That's not Microsoft's fault, nor is it Windows 8's.

Which is a wasted monitor.

How so? It doesn't stay like that all the time, only when you are in the Start screen.  Once you click on the desktop screen or run a desktop application both monitors return to desktop mode.  So both of my monitors are fully utilized just like they were in 7.

iOS and Android have visual cues for everything which is not natural sliding motions. Windows 8 does not. Hot corners are without cue. Sliding from the top down to list running applications has no cue. Closing a Metro app has no cue. Getting rid of a Metro app has no cue.

Nope.  How does someone know that swiping down on iOS brings up the notification bar or when two or when a hold hand is used you can switch between apps, etc.?  Those aren't natural ideas, but ones that people had to learn or stumble upon.

iOS and Android are just as confounding to close apps on.  iOS you have to double tap the home button then press and hold an app icon in the bottom.  Android you have to go into the menus a few layers deep to kill anything.  Windows keeps it resident in the background and will close it automatically if not used and the memory needs to be freed up.

That is exactly how they are confusing.

Really?!?  You do realize it is only the Metro apps that do this, not everything.  And those apps are tailored to work fine in full screen.

Provided you have one. My keyboard doesn't. I have no use for one.

I guess your SOL then.  Again, that's your problem that shouldn't be extended upon others.  Every new Windows PC out there has a Windows Key and they have had Windows Keys on keyboards since the early 90's.  Even Mac keyboards have an Apple key, which can also be used in Windows as a Windows Key.

Easy, but non-obvious, and adds unnecessary cognitive load. I have no desire to memorize arcane hot corners and keys to push to get out of applications I don't even want in the first place.

I will say that Microsoft could have done more to show these new methods to the end user. Remember the welcome tutorial that would pop up in the notification area on every fresh install of Windows XP? I remember finding that so annoying, but it was useful to the first timers out there.

I know of no-one it was useful for. People learn by following visual cues or skeumorphic expectations. Not by memorizing non-obvious spots or gesture.

And yet you think that the older Windows were this natural?  Really?  Try again, it was more likely due to years of using it that you became familiar with where everything is at and how it functions and not because it had visual cues or skeumorphic expectations.  The older Windows were NOT that obvious on how to get the most out of them.

Which is good, but hardly anything most people get much out of.

I beg to differ.  I have found it extremely useful.  In the IT world I have found lots of great use from it that the older Task Managers couldn't provide.  I wish my 2008 R2 servers at work had such a detailed manager for taking a quick peak to diagnose something.  But since it doesn't, I have to revert to Perfmon or another monitoring utility.  I am surprised as an engineer you haven't found the same usefulness from it.  Then again, you might not be that kind of engineer.

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Midwest Forum Pro • Posts: 17,867
Re: Win8 vs Win7
1

absentaneous wrote:

raymb wrote:

Thanks for your reply. I did not intend to start a war, But It seems to create strong feelings one way or the other.

I think I will work on the basis that "if its not broke don,t fix it" and stay with Win7.

thanks again for all the replies

Cheers Ray

I think that makes sense. also, I need to add that I switched to win8 using the discount microsoft was offering when win8 was released. that made the upgrade quite cheap so that was basically the main reason I got win8. if I had to pay the full price I'd probably stay with win7.

I would pay extra to get a new PC with Win 7 on it. Right now they are busy trying to push '8 and fortunately if you look around you can still buy or order a new machine with Windows 7. My mom in law needed a new PC and I helped her pick out a nice i5 CPU desktop machine with Win 7 on it.

Josh152 Senior Member • Posts: 2,018
Re: stick with Win 7 if possible...
1

Midwest wrote:

Archer66 wrote:

theswede wrote:

Archer66 wrote:

For desktop user Win 8 is the same as Win 7 with some improvements:

It's not even remotely the same. There is no hierarchical organization of programs accessed from the start system. There is no obvious way to get rid of a Metro app which takes over the screen. There isn't even any point to Metro on a desktop system.

The differences are very In Your Face and crippling for engineering and science users. I normally have at least dozens of programs to access industrial systems and subsystems installed, with confusing names. In the start menu they're grouped by manufacturer name and then by task to use them for - dead easy to find what I need.

This was about desktop and not about Modern UI. Just pin your most used programs to taskbar or create a shortcut on your desktop just like in Win 7.

I bet most power users do not even use Win 7 start menu, there is no need for it.

Why should I accept a less convenient, more difficult way of doing my job so the easily amused can enjoy a gimmicky desktop that's like a tablet? Why should I accept workarounds that leave me behind where I was before things were 'improved'?

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This I think is the core differnce between people defending Win 8 and people who don't like it.  It all depends on what you use the computer for, how inconvenienced you are by the new UI, and how willing you are to put up with said  inconveniences and work arounds for them to get the eye candy/cool factor of the new UI.

Ho72
Ho72 Senior Member • Posts: 1,807
Pass the popcorn...
1

I can't decide whether this thread is a tragedy or a comedy.

Midwest Forum Pro • Posts: 17,867
Re: stick with Win 7 if possible...
2

VirtualMirage wrote:

theswede wrote:

And how do you propose I find them on that start screen?

Windows Key + C, click on search. Or Windows key to get to the Start Screen, move mouse to right to bring up Charms, and select search. You will see this:

With exception to it being left to right instead of top to bottom, it is in the same hierarchy you would see in 7. If the application installation creates a Start folder, it will be under that "group" name, just like 7. The difference is that with 7 you have to view into those folders via highlighting or clicking and here it is already expanded.

The items on the far left were usually thrown at the bottom of All Programs in 7, here it is in the front since the installation programs didn't create Start folders for them.

Is that too hard? See, it isn't lost. The hierarchy is still there.

Jumping in here....

Having everything I use 'expanded' on the desktop would create a much bigger bunch of applications than you have there. I don't want them all expanded all the time.

I use a PC for all my applications, not a tablet.

So I need to sit down and manually recreate the groups which the installer would do for me on Windows 7? Tell me, how do you propose I find out which software does what, so I can create the hierarchy manually? In the start menu they're already grouped by manufacturer and function so I can easily locate what I need.

You can and be more organized, or you can do what I showed you above and use the older layout Microsoft used. You just have more options now. While you prefer to organize by manufacturer, I prefer to organize by what they do.

I have no idea what they're named.

Sounds like then you have a problem. If you don't know what they are named, then how do you know what you are looking for.

Speaking for myself, since they are within groups which I know what they are, I can easily spot them when I expand the group. Many business and IT and other applications don't have 'catchy' names that we can memorize. I guess you're not in that situation. Some of us are though.

By dragging tiles around you can group them into columns. Spacing it out a little further apart you will see a vertical line appear, this shows that it will create a new group.

In the bottom right hand corner of the screen there is a minus sign (-), click on that. It will zoom the start screen out. From here you can move whole groups of tiles. If you wish to give your groups a name, right click the group and select the Name Group option.

And in the end after doing all of this organization, how is the end result better? Or is it 'about as good, only different' and no real benefit?

My computer and its OS are supposed to serve ME, not the other way around.

drj3 Veteran Member • Posts: 7,663
Re: stick with Win 7 if possible...
1

- Better taskmanager

The task manager is better looking than before, but otherwise not that different. It does integrate other parts of the control panel. Whether that is better or worse is more a matter of taste. Seeing as I come from the "do one job and do it well" camp I'm still undecided.

I find task manager far better than any previous version of Window.  For the first time you can easily and quickly kill a program that is not responding.  In addition it gives a very good real time CPU usage percent for active programs.

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greyowl750
greyowl750 Regular Member • Posts: 120
Linux is an option
1

No viruses or spyware for 3 yrs and counting..and yes you can run most windows software on it as well, using the Wine for windows program...look into it. I did, and im glad.

PS: most versions of Linux is free and 96% of the servers that supply us all with this thing called the internet use it, NOT WINDOWS.

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Patco Forum Pro • Posts: 13,573
Re: Linux is an option
2

greyowl750 wrote:

No viruses or spyware for 3 yrs and counting..and yes you can run most windows software on it as well, using the Wine for windows program...look into it. I did, and im glad.

PS: most versions of Linux is free and 96% of the servers that supply us all with this thing called the internet use it, NOT WINDOWS.

Do you have a source for that statistic? A recent W3Techs survey of web server OS has all Unix & Unix-like (not just Linux) at 64.7%, and Windows at 35.3%.  See "Servers" about half way down:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_share_of_operating_systems#Servers

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Glen Barrington
Glen Barrington Forum Pro • Posts: 19,508
Re: stick with Win 7 if possible...
1

Exactly! I see the payoff for Microsoft, but where is the payoff for ME?

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Glen Barrington
Glen Barrington Forum Pro • Posts: 19,508
Re: stick with Win 7 if possible...
2

drj3 wrote:

- Better taskmanager

The task manager is better looking than before, but otherwise not that different. It does integrate other parts of the control panel. Whether that is better or worse is more a matter of taste. Seeing as I come from the "do one job and do it well" camp I'm still undecided.

I find task manager far better than any previous version of Window. For the first time you can easily and quickly kill a program that is not responding. In addition it gives a very good real time CPU usage percent for active programs.

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drj3

Better than Win7?   Heck, better than Vista even?  I've used all three, and I see no real benefit of one over the other.  I'm willing to listen politely as you explain HOW it's better though.

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dradam Senior Member • Posts: 2,818
Re: Haters?
1

Midwest wrote:

dradam wrote:

1w12q312qw1 wrote:

Archer66 wrote:

Jim Cockfield wrote:

Win 7 = pretty good desktop OS

Win 8 = very bad desktop OS

Typical BS FUD from Jim Cockfield.

For desktop user Win 8 is the same as Win 7 with some improvements:

- Secure booting ( no more rootkits )

- Better file copying with enchanced dialog, you can even pause it

- Better multimonitor support

- Better taskmanager

- Better virtual machine ( Hyper V vs Virtual PC )

- Better printing ( no need to install printer drivers )

You W8 defenders sound exactly like the Microsoft sales team. Everything you list above has no bearing on my Windows7 experience speaking as an avid digital photographer. If I were shopping 8 versus staying 7 and I read your list, I'd yawn and laugh and stay with 7. Honestly, isn't that the crux of MS' problem? It just sounds like you and a few others are trying to sell the Edsel and the marketplace does NOT like the "look" of it, no matter what's under the hood.

And so many of you haters sound like there's some big man who comes to your house and makes you upgrade. The things listed above ARE improvements over 7. If you don't find them compelling enough to upgrade there is one very SIMPLE solution, just don't.

Why is someone who doesn't like something called a 'hater'? I think that's a little over the top

"Hater" as opposed to "defender".  It's an antonym.

dradam Senior Member • Posts: 2,818
Re: Win8 vs Win7
1

Midwest wrote:

dradam wrote:

Midwest wrote:

gs85739az wrote:

Windows 8 will benefit those that use touch screens, mainly tablets/laptops, reaching across ALL DAY to a touch screen on a desktop will prove tiresome!

Absolutely agree. The idea that someone wants to use a keyboard, a mouse, AND touch their screen all the time is complete idiocy. Maybe a couple of foot pedals to replace the shift key and space bar will be next.

Personally, I hate having a screen full of fingerprints. On my iPad? Sure, that's the way it works, that's the nature of it. ADDING that situation on purpose where it doesn't exist already and is not needed - just to make a desktop PC act like a tablet - is just dumb.

I've been running Windows 8 for months, and have yet to feel the need to reach across my desk and touch my screen. It is completely, and totally usable with just keyboard and mouse.

Of course the whole idea behind Win 8 is to have a touch screen and then to do things by touching it.

The whole "idea" behind Win 8 is to better accommodate a variety of monitor sizes and input methods.  Touch is one of those options, but certainly not the only one.

You are only using a keyboard and mouse. Is Windows 8 any better or easier to use that way than Win 7 was?

In some ways, yes, in others, no, in most ways, they are exactly the same.

I don't feel like changing the way I work with my PC to accommodate some half-baked solution to an issue I didn't have in the first place, or to work like an OS that I do not have nor want on my tablet or phone.

MS should have offered the ability to switch the UI entirely from Win 7 to Win 8 style back and forth on the PC - maybe sometimes Win 8 could be better for some things - giving the user the option to use what works best for the task at hand.

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