Is everyone here a professional now

Started Jun 3, 2013 | Discussions
kelpdiver Veteran Member • Posts: 3,660
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

brianj wrote:

WTarcher77 wrote:

I loved shooting with my P&S camera.  I HATED that i missed so many shots.

This example is pretty much what made me decide to "shelf" my P&S.  We were fishing in a remote lake in Canada, as we came out of a river inlet we came across a cow Moose & her triplets in the water.  I tried to capture the event on my camera.  The lag was so bad, that as the boat was coming up with the wave....  the image in the viewfinder was going down.  I never did get a usable image....  and for that matter missed seeing the whole event.

I had the opposite experience when I was in Egypt many years ago, we were carrying our SLR with big zoom lens in a small backpack which my wife was carrying at the time while we rode on donkeys to the Valley of the Kings.  Along the way my donkey's saddle became loose and I slipped to one side and the donkey took off and I was hopping down the road on one leg with my other leg up on the donkey.

Of course my wife couldn't get the brick out in time and we ended up with not a single photo of the event.  We swore that we would never carry cameras like that again, and have had P&S each on our belts since then and better for it.

and thus suffer WTarcher's fate?

The real question is why would you lug an SLR and a big zoom lens on a trek to the Valley of the Kings and have the camera so inaccessible?  That problem is easily solve with a binocular harness.

Rexgig0 Veteran Member • Posts: 6,050
Re: The more serious I am about something, the more fun it is
1

FrankParis wrote:

Since when is being serious about something taking the fun out of it? What a pathetic point of view! Shows a serious misunderstanding about what the joy of life is all about.

I agree with this! Well-said!

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(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 13,144
Re: The more serious I am about something, the more fun it is

Rexgig0 wrote:

FrankParis wrote:

Since when is being serious about something taking the fun out of it? What a pathetic point of view! Shows a serious misunderstanding about what the joy of life is all about.

I agree with this! Well-said!

Absolutely bang on!  The OP is just bitter at SLR users and had to vent/rant.  None of his "argument" makes any sense from a logical point of view.

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9 years of Fujifilm camera usage, ended by rampant fanboyism.

(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 13,144
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

brianj wrote:

WTarcher77 wrote:

I loved shooting with my P&S camera.  I HATED that i missed so many shots.

This example is pretty much what made me decide to "shelf" my P&S.  We were fishing in a remote lake in Canada, as we came out of a river inlet we came across a cow Moose & her triplets in the water.  I tried to capture the event on my camera.  The lag was so bad, that as the boat was coming up with the wave....  the image in the viewfinder was going down.  I never did get a usable image....  and for that matter missed seeing the whole event.

With my D7000 I could have captured 75 images, all spot on, and who knows National Geographic worthy...?

Ever seen a Cow moose with triplets...?   Me either.....  excpet for the 1/10th of a second before I grabbed my P&S camera  

I had the opposite experience when I was in Egypt many years ago, we were carrying our SLR with big zoom lens in a small backpack which my wife was carrying at the time while we rode on donkeys to the Valley of the Kings.  Along the way my donkey's saddle became loose and I slipped to one side and the donkey took off and I was hopping down the road on one leg with my other leg up on the donkey.

Of course my wife couldn't get the brick out in time and we ended up with not a single photo of the event.  We swore that we would never carry cameras like that again, and have had P&S each on our belts since then and better for it.

Brian

If you are unable/unwilling to take care of your gear the way the rest of us do, then it is best that you stick to pocket cameras.

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9 years of Fujifilm camera usage, ended by rampant fanboyism.

rosiesphoto Regular Member • Posts: 200
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

brianj wrote:

When this site began it seemed to be teaming with amatuer and hobbyist photographer who revelled in getting more out of their new 2mp P&S digital cameras, it was really exciting days.

Now when I am reading threads people talk about carrying a P&S for unexpected things like someone runs into their car, but here's the interesting part, they say 'but when I am on a serious shoot' I take out the DSLR.

I take photos all the time and when I go on holidays I take a lot more, I love taking photos, but there is nothing serious about it, its just to record my family's life and have fun.

What is this serious photography that requires a DSLR, is it paid work, or something that their life depends on, will they lose face?

Can anyone please explain what has happened to people these days that everything has become so serious, where is the fun gone?  Is it only over on the Connect site?

Brian

You’re missing the point. Photography is the art of taking pictures, not the gear. If you consider yourself a "photographer" than you are continuously learning and challenging yourself to produce the best with the equipment you have. Personally when I pick up my P&S or DSLR my mindset changes, I expect the best out of myself.

And of course at times taking photos of the kids running around you are reacting and there is no time to think. When on Holiday you are serious in that you pose the family in the correct background and lighting. How many times have you seen people taking pictures and you say to yourself I would do this or that. Is this a sign that you take photography seriously.

The serious shoot for me as an "Avid photography hobbyist" is applying all the techniques I learned to find different compositions and using my DSLR to its maximum capabilities.

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Mark B. Forum Pro • Posts: 25,572
Re: I'm very professional, just not in photography...

sean lancaster wrote:

Mark B. wrote:

brianj wrote:

newmikey wrote:

But by and large, I agree with you. All this professional lingo like going on "a shoot", looking down on "snapshots" as if they smell bad and giving total noobs looking for their first DSLR the advice that nothing less than a FF Canon/Nikon will do.

I am very serious about photography but in the end I am most definitely "just an amateur".

The over the top advice is something that knocks my socks off, some novice will ask a simple question, and the answer is invariably that you need to go out and buy the best that money can buy then you must use raw to process your images even though the novice has never heard of these things.  In the end all the person wanted to do was take a picture of his dog.

These gross genralizations are part of the problem.  I don't see anyone recommending a DSLR and high-end lenses to take pictures of a dog, no more than anyone is offering their organs for sale or taking a mortgage out to pay for equipment.

I think the strawman generalizations are more than just "part of the problem."

I was trying to be nice

ABA DABA Veteran Member • Posts: 3,088
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

brianj wrote:

When this site began it seemed to be teaming with amatuer and hobbyist photographer who revelled in getting more out of their new 2mp P&S digital cameras, it was really exciting days.

hat is this serious photography that requires a DSLR, is it paid work, or something that their life depends on, will they lose face?

Serious is they can now use the "P" button for professional or onsome cams "A"

Can anyone please explain what has happened to people these days that everything has become so serious, where is the fun gone?  Is it only over on the Connect site?

Brian

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ABA DABA

Rafael CG Regular Member • Posts: 102
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

brianj wrote:

When this site began it seemed to be teaming with amatuer and hobbyist photographer who revelled in getting more out of their new 2mp P&S digital cameras, it was really exciting days.

Now when I am reading threads people talk about carrying a P&S for unexpected things like someone runs into their car, but here's the interesting part, they say 'but when I am on a serious shoot' I take out the DSLR.

I take photos all the time and when I go on holidays I take a lot more, I love taking photos, but there is nothing serious about it, its just to record my family's life and have fun.

What is this serious photography that requires a DSLR, is it paid work, or something that their life depends on, will they lose face?

Can anyone please explain what has happened to people these days that everything has become so serious, where is the fun gone?  Is it only over on the Connect site?

Brian

Quality

My wife and daughter uses P&S and I hate the quality, serious or not i want high quality images, DSLR gives me that

Chad Gladstone Senior Member • Posts: 2,608
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

brianj wrote:

Chad Gladstone wrote:

brianj wrote:

When this site began it seemed to be teaming with amatuer and hobbyist photographer who revelled in getting more out of their new 2mp P&S digital cameras, it was really exciting days.

Now when I am reading threads people talk about carrying a P&S for unexpected things like someone runs into their car, but here's the interesting part, they say 'but when I am on a serious shoot' I take out the DSLR.

I take photos all the time and when I go on holidays I take a lot more, I love taking photos, but there is nothing serious about it, its just to record my family's life and have fun.

What is this serious photography that requires a DSLR, is it paid work, or something that their life depends on, will they lose face?

Can anyone please explain what has happened to people these days that everything has become so serious, where is the fun gone?  Is it only over on the Connect site?

Brian

Did not read the responses but I have been shooting DSLR since the original Canon Rebel days and have substantial investment in equipment now.  I often shoot for others, but decline compensation on principle.  I have observed a stark decline in pro photography gear in public, even in places where only a DSLR is sufficiently capable of capturing the image, irrespective of the shooter's relative skill.  At dance recitals or sporting events there are often no other photography enthusiasts who are documenting the event with anything other than a cell phone.  My observations may be spurious, but I cannot help but contend that people are becoming content with mediocrity and further, that there are few (as a percentage of the populations) that remain committed to remain on the bleeding edge of technological improvements and thus, those who continue to post here, are fast becoming a discrete and insular minority.  Whether there needs to be further compartmentalization beyond enthusiast and professional, is more a measure of compensation, rather than talent.  There is no "fun" in photography.  Capturing an event through the perspective of a tiny viewfinder is a pursuit that benefits only those, dwindling few, who appreciate the effort, and understand how monumental an achievement it is.

I pity those who are attempting to make a profession out of it, as it is a long, solitary road, that, while more and more attempt, fewer can and will succeed at.  The democratization of the modern digital camera appears only to be diluting the pool of fine images and requires, one, by necessity, to wade through the chaff for wheat.  It seems anyone with a few hundred dollars to spend can incorporate, print business cards, and fancy themselves a professional and subject the public to their suspect abilities.  Few are born with it, the rest of us spend a lifetime, chasing after and trying to capture it.

"There is no "fun" in photography."

A wise man once said, 'don't turn your hobby into your work, as you will end up hating it'.

Brian

I seriously doubt that that "wise man" was a successful photographer.  I have noting against the hobby as a form of diversion, but achieving a combination of light, color, precision timing, framing, whilst balancing barely enough depth of field, shutterspeeds verging on disaster and iso as low as is humanly possible all while viewing an event through a miniscule viewfinder is a work of self deprecation, irrespective of how much enjoyment one is provided by the undertaking or mastery of the subject matter.  Sometimes, it is nice to just sit back and be a spectator.  The problem is that few seem inclined to take up the mantle, and fewer still have the equipment or wherewithal to make the endeavor a worthwhile undertaking.

The loss of the profession of the "professional photographer,"  as an occupation unto itself, will only be missed by the remaining few that appreciate the effort.  With this generation, the masses appear satisfied with convenience over quality and do not see the relative value in it pursuing what is possible to achieve or on the other hand, willing to compensate another for a skill set that they don't even know that the lack (except perhaps, for the obligatory "cut rate" wedding photographer which I have heretofore remarked upon).  This is shameful when the equipment is finally becoming mature and remarkably more capable than just a few short generations ago.  Perhaps one day, it will even be "fun".  For now, at least, it is hard work.  Made more challenging by a horizontally integrated field composed primarily with point and shoot aficionados (not that there is anything wrong with that - but there is a substantial lag between the consumer products potential and the specialty of precision instrument in capable hands).  I, for one, am increasingly appearing out of place at events with my huge DLSR, giant lenses and tripod when the arena is speckled with row after row of iphones and androids devices with none of the other spectators being the wiser.  Why would they be when they are sharing them via facebook or instagram, anyway?

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Chad Gladstone

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(unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 3,860
Maybe its...

brianj wrote:

When this site began it seemed to be teaming with amatuer and hobbyist photographer who revelled in getting more out of their new 2mp P&S digital cameras, it was really exciting days.

Now when I am reading threads people talk about carrying a P&S for unexpected things like someone runs into their car, but here's the interesting part, they say 'but when I am on a serious shoot' I take out the DSLR.

I take photos all the time and when I go on holidays I take a lot more, I love taking photos, but there is nothing serious about it, its just to record my family's life and have fun.

What is this serious photography that requires a DSLR, is it paid work, or something that their life depends on, will they lose face?

Can anyone please explain what has happened to people these days that everything has become so serious, where is the fun gone?  Is it only over on the Connect site?

Brian

...folks never endured the early days of digi-cams (still have my Agfa 1680 1.3MP cam) and people just don't know how to use todays powerful and incredible DSLR's properly. ...or maybe too many don't care about taking good pictures and just want convenience "snap shots" to capture their vacations????. Love my 7D and grip.

Ubilam.

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"Hey, don't blame me."

Najinsky Veteran Member • Posts: 5,739
Here's a novel idea.

Why don't people talk about themselves?

I start reading the replies, and many are full of people making assumptions (sometimes disparaging) about others.

I can make assumptions about others too, if that's what I want. But I'm much more interested in hearing your own stories.

Here's mine.

SLR in my early 20s. Abandoned it when I split with my girlfriend (my main subject).

Then used regular tourist film cameras, 110 or APS until digital came along. Vacations and Events.

The Fujifilm MX2700 got good reviews in computer magazines and I bought one but wasn't impressed with the images on computer (but they looked okay printed). Still vacations and events.

Seeking better IQ I got a Nikon 5700 bridge camera. This reignited my interest in photography and I began photography as a hobby again. This essentially means not just having a camera for vacations and events like everyone does, but going out with the camera at weekends and evening with the intention of finding things to photograph.

The 5700 lens broke so I made the decision to move to a DSLR and bought a Canon 20D. Then I discovered the difference between a kit lens and a nice lens and started becoming a glass junky and went full frame with a 5D.

During this time, I'd taken a lot of images and got a reputation among my friends as being a bit of a photographer, and people were wanting me to cover events for them. People also were asking for me to produce prints for them to hang on there wall.

This switched me on to the idea that some of my images had commercial value. The vast majority didn't, but some did. Some images that I thought might have value, when submitted to online sites for sale were rejected due to IQ issues. Noise, dust, critical focus/sharpness.

I don't go out and seek to make commercial images, I shoot for primarily for fun and to practice and learn techniques, but now having an awareness that some of the images I produce have commercial value, I try to make sure I obtain images that have high technical IQ (good sharpness, low noise, clean) in case I decided to sell them through a channel that will QA the images.

When I go somewhere, say to the local market square for lunch, I always take my camera (currently an OM-D) with a single good quality lens so that I can capture images with good IQ. I also take a compact (currently an RX100) to fill a different FL than the lens on the OM-D. My expectation is that I wont get any commercial images with the RX100 (not impossible, just much less likely), but they will be plenty good enough for my albums, slideshows and wall prints. This a would call casual shooting.

But sometimes I go out specifically to find photo opportunities, and here I think there is a higher chance of producing an image with some commercial value, so for these I take a selection of good lenses to cover a range of focal lengths and perhaps even some lighting gear. This I would call serious shooting.

The difference is in the focus. In the first instance, I was going to eat lunch, and just took my camera along. In the second, I'm going to take photos, but might still stop for lunch.

-Najinsky

OP brianj Forum Pro • Posts: 14,657
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

Chad Gladstone wrote:

brianj wrote:

Chad Gladstone wrote:

brianj wrote:

When this site began it seemed to be teaming with amatuer and hobbyist photographer who revelled in getting more out of their new 2mp P&S digital cameras, it was really exciting days.

Now when I am reading threads people talk about carrying a P&S for unexpected things like someone runs into their car, but here's the interesting part, they say 'but when I am on a serious shoot' I take out the DSLR.

I take photos all the time and when I go on holidays I take a lot more, I love taking photos, but there is nothing serious about it, its just to record my family's life and have fun.

What is this serious photography that requires a DSLR, is it paid work, or something that their life depends on, will they lose face?

Can anyone please explain what has happened to people these days that everything has become so serious, where is the fun gone?  Is it only over on the Connect site?

Brian

Did not read the responses but I have been shooting DSLR since the original Canon Rebel days and have substantial investment in equipment now.  I often shoot for others, but decline compensation on principle.  I have observed a stark decline in pro photography gear in public, even in places where only a DSLR is sufficiently capable of capturing the image, irrespective of the shooter's relative skill.  At dance recitals or sporting events there are often no other photography enthusiasts who are documenting the event with anything other than a cell phone.  My observations may be spurious, but I cannot help but contend that people are becoming content with mediocrity and further, that there are few (as a percentage of the populations) that remain committed to remain on the bleeding edge of technological improvements and thus, those who continue to post here, are fast becoming a discrete and insular minority.  Whether there needs to be further compartmentalization beyond enthusiast and professional, is more a measure of compensation, rather than talent.  There is no "fun" in photography.  Capturing an event through the perspective of a tiny viewfinder is a pursuit that benefits only those, dwindling few, who appreciate the effort, and understand how monumental an achievement it is.

I pity those who are attempting to make a profession out of it, as it is a long, solitary road, that, while more and more attempt, fewer can and will succeed at.  The democratization of the modern digital camera appears only to be diluting the pool of fine images and requires, one, by necessity, to wade through the chaff for wheat.  It seems anyone with a few hundred dollars to spend can incorporate, print business cards, and fancy themselves a professional and subject the public to their suspect abilities.  Few are born with it, the rest of us spend a lifetime, chasing after and trying to capture it.

"There is no "fun" in photography."

A wise man once said, 'don't turn your hobby into your work, as you will end up hating it'.

Brian

I seriously doubt that that "wise man" was a successful photographer.  I have noting against the hobby as a form of diversion, but achieving a combination of light, color, precision timing, framing, whilst balancing barely enough depth of field, shutterspeeds verging on disaster and iso as low as is humanly possible all while viewing an event through a miniscule viewfinder is a work of self deprecation, irrespective of how much enjoyment one is provided by the undertaking or mastery of the subject matter.  Sometimes, it is nice to just sit back and be a spectator.  The problem is that few seem inclined to take up the mantle, and fewer still have the equipment or wherewithal to make the endeavor a worthwhile undertaking.

Some climb Mt Everest while others stroll in the park and smell the roses.

The loss of the profession of the "professional photographer,"  as an occupation unto itself, will only be missed by the remaining few that appreciate the effort.  With this generation, the masses appear satisfied with convenience over quality and do not see the relative value in it pursuing what is possible to achieve or on the other hand, willing to compensate another for a skill set that they don't even know that the lack (except perhaps, for the obligatory "cut rate" wedding photographer which I have heretofore remarked upon).  This is shameful when the equipment is finally becoming mature and remarkably more capable than just a few short generations ago.  Perhaps one day, it will even be "fun".  For now, at least, it is hard work.  Made more challenging by a horizontally integrated field composed primarily with point and shoot aficionados (not that there is anything wrong with that - but there is a substantial lag between the consumer products potential and the specialty of precision instrument in capable hands).  I, for one, am increasingly appearing out of place at events with my huge DLSR, giant lenses and tripod when the arena is speckled with row after row of iphones and androids devices with none of the other spectators being the wiser.  Why would they be when they are sharing them via facebook or instagram, anyway?

I understand your feeling of loss, anyone who is over 50 is probably feeling similair, its not only photography that has been dumbed down or disappeared completely, but that is the way it is, none of us can stop it.

Brian

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OP brianj Forum Pro • Posts: 14,657
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

rattymouse wrote:

brianj wrote:

WTarcher77 wrote:

I loved shooting with my P&S camera.  I HATED that i missed so many shots.

This example is pretty much what made me decide to "shelf" my P&S.  We were fishing in a remote lake in Canada, as we came out of a river inlet we came across a cow Moose & her triplets in the water.  I tried to capture the event on my camera.  The lag was so bad, that as the boat was coming up with the wave....  the image in the viewfinder was going down.  I never did get a usable image....  and for that matter missed seeing the whole event.

With my D7000 I could have captured 75 images, all spot on, and who knows National Geographic worthy...?

Ever seen a Cow moose with triplets...?   Me either.....  excpet for the 1/10th of a second before I grabbed my P&S camera  

I had the opposite experience when I was in Egypt many years ago, we were carrying our SLR with big zoom lens in a small backpack which my wife was carrying at the time while we rode on donkeys to the Valley of the Kings.  Along the way my donkey's saddle became loose and I slipped to one side and the donkey took off and I was hopping down the road on one leg with my other leg up on the donkey.

Of course my wife couldn't get the brick out in time and we ended up with not a single photo of the event.  We swore that we would never carry cameras like that again, and have had P&S each on our belts since then and better for it.

Brian

If you are unable/unwilling to take care of your gear the way the rest of us do, then it is best that you stick to pocket cameras.

I agree.

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OP brianj Forum Pro • Posts: 14,657
Re: The more serious I am about something, the more fun it is

rattymouse wrote:

Rexgig0 wrote:

FrankParis wrote:

Since when is being serious about something taking the fun out of it? What a pathetic point of view! Shows a serious misunderstanding about what the joy of life is all about.

I agree with this! Well-said!

Absolutely bang on!  The OP is just bitter at SLR users and had to vent/rant.  None of his "argument" makes any sense from a logical point of view.

Why are you all worrying about it then?

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Canon PowerShot ELPH 330 HS
(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 13,144
Re: The more serious I am about something, the more fun it is

brianj wrote:

rattymouse wrote:

Rexgig0 wrote:

FrankParis wrote:

Since when is being serious about something taking the fun out of it? What a pathetic point of view! Shows a serious misunderstanding about what the joy of life is all about.

I agree with this! Well-said!

Absolutely bang on!  The OP is just bitter at SLR users and had to vent/rant.  None of his "argument" makes any sense from a logical point of view.

Why are you all worrying about it then?

You lack comprehension.  We are commenting on YOU worrying about others and the gear they use. .

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9 years of Fujifilm camera usage, ended by rampant fanboyism.

OP brianj Forum Pro • Posts: 14,657
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

rosiesphoto wrote:

brianj wrote:

When this site began it seemed to be teaming with amatuer and hobbyist photographer who revelled in getting more out of their new 2mp P&S digital cameras, it was really exciting days.

Now when I am reading threads people talk about carrying a P&S for unexpected things like someone runs into their car, but here's the interesting part, they say 'but when I am on a serious shoot' I take out the DSLR.

I take photos all the time and when I go on holidays I take a lot more, I love taking photos, but there is nothing serious about it, its just to record my family's life and have fun.

What is this serious photography that requires a DSLR, is it paid work, or something that their life depends on, will they lose face?

Can anyone please explain what has happened to people these days that everything has become so serious, where is the fun gone?  Is it only over on the Connect site?

Brian

You’re missing the point. Photography is the art of taking pictures, not the gear. If you consider yourself a "photographer" than you are continuously learning and challenging yourself to produce the best with the equipment you have. Personally when I pick up my P&S or DSLR my mindset changes, I expect the best out of myself.

And of course at times taking photos of the kids running around you are reacting and there is no time to think. When on Holiday you are serious in that you pose the family in the correct background and lighting. How many times have you seen people taking pictures and you say to yourself I would do this or that. Is this a sign that you take photography seriously.

The serious shoot for me as an "Avid photography hobbyist" is applying all the techniques I learned to find different compositions and using my DSLR to its maximum capabilities.

I agree, and that is what I also do, its just that I carry a smaller camera.  But I don't make a big point of it and say I only pick up my P&S when I am on a serious outting.

The point of the OP is that we don't need DSLR owners shoving it in our face all the time how their camera is the only one that can be used if you are a real photographer or going to do some real shooting.

Brian

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OP brianj Forum Pro • Posts: 14,657
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

Rafael CG wrote:

brianj wrote:

When this site began it seemed to be teaming with amatuer and hobbyist photographer who revelled in getting more out of their new 2mp P&S digital cameras, it was really exciting days.

Now when I am reading threads people talk about carrying a P&S for unexpected things like someone runs into their car, but here's the interesting part, they say 'but when I am on a serious shoot' I take out the DSLR.

I take photos all the time and when I go on holidays I take a lot more, I love taking photos, but there is nothing serious about it, its just to record my family's life and have fun.

What is this serious photography that requires a DSLR, is it paid work, or something that their life depends on, will they lose face?

Can anyone please explain what has happened to people these days that everything has become so serious, where is the fun gone?  Is it only over on the Connect site?

Brian

Quality

My wife and daughter uses P&S and I hate the quality, serious or not i want high quality images, DSLR gives me that

Are they doing something wrong?

 brianj's gear list:brianj's gear list
Canon PowerShot ELPH 330 HS
OP brianj Forum Pro • Posts: 14,657
Re: Here's a novel idea.

Najinsky wrote:

Why don't people talk about themselves?

I start reading the replies, and many are full of people making assumptions (sometimes disparaging) about others.

I can make assumptions about others too, if that's what I want. But I'm much more interested in hearing your own stories.

Here's mine.

SLR in my early 20s. Abandoned it when I split with my girlfriend (my main subject).

Then used regular tourist film cameras, 110 or APS until digital came along. Vacations and Events.

The Fujifilm MX2700 got good reviews in computer magazines and I bought one but wasn't impressed with the images on computer (but they looked okay printed). Still vacations and events.

Seeking better IQ I got a Nikon 5700 bridge camera. This reignited my interest in photography and I began photography as a hobby again. This essentially means not just having a camera for vacations and events like everyone does, but going out with the camera at weekends and evening with the intention of finding things to photograph.

The 5700 lens broke so I made the decision to move to a DSLR and bought a Canon 20D. Then I discovered the difference between a kit lens and a nice lens and started becoming a glass junky and went full frame with a 5D.

During this time, I'd taken a lot of images and got a reputation among my friends as being a bit of a photographer, and people were wanting me to cover events for them. People also were asking for me to produce prints for them to hang on there wall.

This switched me on to the idea that some of my images had commercial value. The vast majority didn't, but some did. Some images that I thought might have value, when submitted to online sites for sale were rejected due to IQ issues. Noise, dust, critical focus/sharpness.

I don't go out and seek to make commercial images, I shoot for primarily for fun and to practice and learn techniques, but now having an awareness that some of the images I produce have commercial value, I try to make sure I obtain images that have high technical IQ (good sharpness, low noise, clean) in case I decided to sell them through a channel that will QA the images.

When I go somewhere, say to the local market square for lunch, I always take my camera (currently an OM-D) with a single good quality lens so that I can capture images with good IQ. I also take a compact (currently an RX100) to fill a different FL than the lens on the OM-D. My expectation is that I wont get any commercial images with the RX100 (not impossible, just much less likely), but they will be plenty good enough for my albums, slideshows and wall prints. This a would call casual shooting.

But sometimes I go out specifically to find photo opportunities, and here I think there is a higher chance of producing an image with some commercial value, so for these I take a selection of good lenses to cover a range of focal lengths and perhaps even some lighting gear. This I would call serious shooting.

The difference is in the focus. In the first instance, I was going to eat lunch, and just took my camera along. In the second, I'm going to take photos, but might still stop for lunch.

-Najinsky

Thanks for the story, and I would have to say that when I am not on a international tour then all my photography is the first instance you gave.

Brian

 brianj's gear list:brianj's gear list
Canon PowerShot ELPH 330 HS
(unknown member) Forum Pro • Posts: 13,144
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

"‘Although we enjoy the compact market, it's fantastic for Fuji to get back to "real" photography (with the X Cameras).'"

Adrian Clarke, VP for Fujifilm Europe.

-- hide signature --

9 years of Fujifilm camera usage, ended by rampant fanboyism.

OP brianj Forum Pro • Posts: 14,657
Re: Is everyone here a professional now

rattymouse wrote:

"‘Although we enjoy the compact market, it's fantastic for Fuji to get back to "real" photography (with the X Cameras).'"

Adrian Clarke, VP for Fujifilm Europe.

Good to hear, but I won't be buying any of them, I cannot justify those prices, the last one I bought was $AU200 and it will last two years, that averages out to $AU2 / week.

Brian

 brianj's gear list:brianj's gear list
Canon PowerShot ELPH 330 HS
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