**weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

Started May 19, 2013 | Discussions
sam7028 Regular Member • Posts: 181
Re: **weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

Both are hand-held JPG, no PP except cropping.  A77+70-400G.  Amazing combo!

About 400' away, at the top of a tall tree. In-camera 2.0x tele

Downsizing by DPR slightly blurs the quality (at least on my screen).  The hairs/feathers are crisp-sharp in the originals.  My favorite glass.

What more could I ask for!

dennismullen
dennismullen Veteran Member • Posts: 9,019
Re: Florida - BIFs and swamp waders

Hi Justin,

A nice set of wildlife pictures.
I sure envy your target rich environment.

Cheers,

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"Those who would sacrifice liberty for safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Ben Franklin.
You can see larger versions of my pictures at www.dennismullen.com.

Sam_Oslo
Sam_Oslo Veteran Member • Posts: 3,055
Re: **weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

Good job with cuuuuuuuut ducklings  , Sony 70-400mm  is a doing a great job too, again. But is that  ISO 2000 right out of A77, or a mismatch?

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(unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 6,192
Re: **weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

Rather mundane and unexotic I am afraid but a very tame young blackbird preening itself in the garden. This is with a Tamron 70-300. Should have upped the ISO and tightened the aperture probably. Please view the out of focus bits as artistic bokeh.

Edit: If you look at his eye with the loupe you can see the reflection of the sun in a cloudy sky. The sort of details these cameras record is amazing.

Gene Tenold wrote:

It's time to post your wildlife images.

All wildlife not contained or restricted (NO pets or zoo animals please).

All systems are welcome. When not Sony, please indicate the equipment.

When posting your own images, please reply to this first post in the thread;  otherwise, thread viewers will likely overlook your contribution.

Gene.

sam7028 Regular Member • Posts: 181
Re: **weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

iso 2000 is correct.

TheVoid Senior Member • Posts: 1,721
A couple more--identification help?

I think this is a common tern or caspian tern? Shot outside my office building in Salt Lake City this morning, with Sony 70-300G. OOC JPegs with some quick cropping and downsizing.

And some more baby ducks:

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Jeremy

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Atgard
Atgard Regular Member • Posts: 432
Re: **weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

Greynerd wrote:

Edit: If you look at his eye with the loupe you can see the reflection of the sun in a cloudy sky. The sort of details these cameras record is amazing.

That is pretty darn cool!

 Atgard's gear list:Atgard's gear list
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Paige Wood Forum Member • Posts: 72
Re: Safari advice

Hi Scott,

I live in SA, and also have a Field Guide qualification ( not my job now) but I did run an open vehicle in Kruger National park for 2 years, and have generally visted there at least twice per year ( for +40 yrs), and many other Parks, so I hope I can help.

If you are going to KNP or surrounds between May and October/ November, that is the dry season, so the bush is very much thinner and you can see a lot further. Rains normally start Oct/ Nov ( They can be very hot months as the humidity builds ) and then the bush looks lovely. The spread of game also changes - in winter there is a lot more game around water holes, in summer the pools are more spread, so is the game.

Once again the general rule in Africa for lenses is the longer the better, BUT, the practicality factor is very important. I have had Canons, Nikons, and at the moment a Sony A700, and I believe the best lens I have ever taken with me is the Sony 70-400G. I borrowed one from Sony and I never took it off the camera, and I was blown away by the quaality. It was also very manageable. I have had 300 2.8's and other big lenses, and the 70400G just did everything so well, I don't miss the others, except very rarely with very bad light. Generally the light is very good and you shouldn't have a hassle.

One thing to bear in mind that if you are going on an open vehicle in a group, you may have 10 on a vehicle - 3 x3 seats and one in the front ( if you are lucky less - PUSH for less ). This makes practicality very important. I found even 2 bodies if they are not well packed can be a space problem, and I did once see one of them take flight in an emergency stop. You need to be on one of the sides of the vehicle ( the middle is no good for photos ) and you need to chat to the driver beforehand and tell him you are a serious phtog, and he needs to trun off the engine when you see something good - they are often not sensitive to the vibration. You should also expect a lot of excited movement from passengers, so always tell them when you are ready - otherwise blurred shots.

I don't belive the hassle of a tripod in KNP or similar is worth it - the bean bag rules there - either in vehicles or in the bird hides. For me personally I now only take 2 lenses - a wide to moderate zoom eg in Sony 24 -70 or 16 - 80, and then the long zoom - for me 70400G. I don't know what your equiv would be in micro 4/3, but I guess something like 12 - 50 and 75-300, and ? a macro if you like that. Just remeber the dust can be very bad - you do NOT want to be changing lenses on an open vehicle if you don't have to.

If you are going to the Kalahari, then the dust is worse ( by far ) dust proof everything, and a longer lens really useful - and only then maybe a tripod.

Hope this is helpful. If you have any further queries, I'll do my best to help,

Cheers,

Tony

padavid Senior Member • Posts: 1,001
Re: **weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

On your mark...get set...                                                                  D40/18-70

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dave

(unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 6,192
Re: A couple more--identification help?

Nice pictures. With the black bill tip and red legs I would go with Common Tern.

padavid Senior Member • Posts: 1,001
Re: **weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

Nikon D5200/AF-S 300 f.4

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dave

tjensen Forum Member • Posts: 81
Re: **weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

Got him!

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NZ Scott
NZ Scott Veteran Member • Posts: 4,790
Re: Safari advice

Paige Wood wrote:

Hey Tony,

I really appreciate your detailed response. Thanks a lot. Much of it confirms some things I already suspected, such as the generally good quantity of light and the issue with dust. My camera and lens are not dustproof, so I might wrap them in a plastic bag or something to mitigate that problem.

I'm glad to hear that you've been getting good results with the 70-400, which is f5.6 at the long end. My 75-300 is only f6.7 at the long end, and I've been a bit worried about that.

Thanks again.

S

Hi Scott,

I live in SA, and also have a Field Guide qualification ( not my job now) but I did run an open vehicle in Kruger National park for 2 years, and have generally visted there at least twice per year ( for +40 yrs), and many other Parks, so I hope I can help.

If you are going to KNP or surrounds between May and October/ November, that is the dry season, so the bush is very much thinner and you can see a lot further. Rains normally start Oct/ Nov ( They can be very hot months as the humidity builds ) and then the bush looks lovely. The spread of game also changes - in winter there is a lot more game around water holes, in summer the pools are more spread, so is the game.

Once again the general rule in Africa for lenses is the longer the better, BUT, the practicality factor is very important. I have had Canons, Nikons, and at the moment a Sony A700, and I believe the best lens I have ever taken with me is the Sony 70-400G. I borrowed one from Sony and I never took it off the camera, and I was blown away by the quaality. It was also very manageable. I have had 300 2.8's and other big lenses, and the 70400G just did everything so well, I don't miss the others, except very rarely with very bad light. Generally the light is very good and you shouldn't have a hassle.

One thing to bear in mind that if you are going on an open vehicle in a group, you may have 10 on a vehicle - 3 x3 seats and one in the front ( if you are lucky less - PUSH for less ). This makes practicality very important. I found even 2 bodies if they are not well packed can be a space problem, and I did once see one of them take flight in an emergency stop. You need to be on one of the sides of the vehicle ( the middle is no good for photos ) and you need to chat to the driver beforehand and tell him you are a serious phtog, and he needs to trun off the engine when you see something good - they are often not sensitive to the vibration. You should also expect a lot of excited movement from passengers, so always tell them when you are ready - otherwise blurred shots.

I don't belive the hassle of a tripod in KNP or similar is worth it - the bean bag rules there - either in vehicles or in the bird hides. For me personally I now only take 2 lenses - a wide to moderate zoom eg in Sony 24 -70 or 16 - 80, and then the long zoom - for me 70400G. I don't know what your equiv would be in micro 4/3, but I guess something like 12 - 50 and 75-300, and ? a macro if you like that. Just remeber the dust can be very bad - you do NOT want to be changing lenses on an open vehicle if you don't have to.

If you are going to the Kalahari, then the dust is worse ( by far ) dust proof everything, and a longer lens really useful - and only then maybe a tripod.

Hope this is helpful. If you have any further queries, I'll do my best to help,

Cheers,

Tony

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Amateur Sony Shooter Veteran Member • Posts: 5,433
Bald eagles - in Alaska!

Hi friends,

I am on Alaska cruise and today I am in the first port of call Ketchikan. I took a fishing & crab tour and there were lots of eagles in near range. I took near 200 shots (they were all keeper) here are just some of my shots.

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steelhead3 Veteran Member • Posts: 7,577
Re: **weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

Even though we have lots of BE in my area, you just have to love Alaska.

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Sony a77 II
Ed at Ridersite Forum Pro • Posts: 18,888
Re: Bald eagles - in Alaska!

That 1st one is dynamite!  Very cool angle from the top and the splash works wonders.

Nice shootin!

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Aranea Forum Member • Posts: 86
Re: **weekly wildlife 5/19-5/26**

This is my first posting of images under this title. All were taken with the big beer can. I'm very satisfied with the colors and clarity in these photos. I'm looking forward to hearing what you think.

Paige Wood Forum Member • Posts: 72
Re: Safari advice

Hi Scott,

Once again depending where you are going, the dust thing may not be a major issue. If you are in Kruger NP, all the main roads are tar, so the vehicle is not generating a lot of dust. The link roads are all dirt, and then there is quite a bit of dust. In KNP if I am in an open vehecle, I just cover my camera with a jacket or something like that travelling, and never had a hssle. It is changing lenses that I think is a problem, which is why I keep a medium/ long zoom on most of the time - or why a second body is great. In many places you will have animals in the road, and in fact far too close for even a 70 - I have been down to 30 quite often. But the birds are superb, so a long lens there for sure. Just a tip on the open vehicle. If it is full, try to sit in the first or second row. The third ( back ) row is out over the back axle, and acts a bit like a catapult, so if people move in the vehicle, the movement is exagerated. The view is best out the back, but not best  for pics.

If you are going to the Kalahari, then definitely plastic bags, change lenses inside a clean bag, and clean everything every night. The dust can be like talcum powder - watch the Top Gear Africa edition Edition!!.

If you do know where you are going and when, you can get hold of me, and I will try to tell you some of the best places and hides to get the best pics. If your time is limited, you need it all.

Cheers, and all the best.

Tony

NZ Scott
NZ Scott Veteran Member • Posts: 4,790
Re: Safari advice

Paige Wood wrote:

Hi Scott,

Once again depending where you are going, the dust thing may not be a major issue. If you are in Kruger NP, all the main roads are tar, so the vehicle is not generating a lot of dust. The link roads are all dirt, and then there is quite a bit of dust. In KNP if I am in an open vehecle, I just cover my camera with a jacket or something like that travelling, and never had a hssle. It is changing lenses that I think is a problem, which is why I keep a medium/ long zoom on most of the time - or why a second body is great. In many places you will have animals in the road, and in fact far too close for even a 70 - I have been down to 30 quite often. But the birds are superb, so a long lens there for sure. Just a tip on the open vehicle. If it is full, try to sit in the first or second row. The third ( back ) row is out over the back axle, and acts a bit like a catapult, so if people move in the vehicle, the movement is exagerated. The view is best out the back, but not best  for pics.

If you are going to the Kalahari, then definitely plastic bags, change lenses inside a clean bag, and clean everything every night. The dust can be like talcum powder - watch the Top Gear Africa edition Edition!!.

If you do know where you are going and when, you can get hold of me, and I will try to tell you some of the best places and hides to get the best pics. If your time is limited, you need it all.

Cheers, and all the best.

Tony

It's a 58 day trip though Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, Botswana, Namibia and South Africa, so it's difficult to summarise. We don't appear to be going to Kruger, however. Only the last 3-4 days of the safari are in South Africa. We're travelling with a tour group (Acacia Africa) the whole way, so I don't think there will be many opportunities of individual animal-spotting. We're finishing in Cape Town, and intend to stay with some friends there.

Thanks for the tips - they're helpful.

S

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Paige Wood Forum Member • Posts: 72
Re: Safari advice

Unbelieveable trip. I am seriously jealous. Hope you have a really great trip, and look forward to the pics. Take a WA for Cape Town

Cheers,

Tony

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