Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

Started Apr 12, 2013 | Discussions
Fogsville Contributing Member • Posts: 577
Re: Any one has the sensor magnifier from Copper hill?

MTT wrote:

Is it worth buying?

Mark

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Why do you have to 'put your two cents in'.. but it's only a 'penny for your thoughts'? Where's that extra penny going to?
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You can get those pretty much anywhere for about $9.00.  I bought mine from CVS pharmacy several years ago and keep in my car for reading small print and stuff at night.  It's the same one that Copperhill sells. Get it here.

Edit: sorry, yes it does work well as a sensor magnifier.....

dwight3
dwight3 Senior Member • Posts: 2,498
Re: I have, a few times a year

PHXAZCRAIG wrote:

steven2874 wrote:

PHXAZCRAIG wrote:

Every so often I set down and clean all my cameras, and my wife.

How many Pecpads does it take to clean the wife?

Hmm.   Maybe not so many as other guys.  My wife is only 4' 11".

For the life of me, I can't figure out how I wrote that!   I think I meant 'lenses' and my wife came in and started to talk while I was typing.

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Craig
www.cjcphoto.net

Happens to me all the time.

I mean my wife starting to talk at me when I'm typing.

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scokill Veteran Member • Posts: 4,283
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

Mully410 wrote:

+ for Copperhill.  I tried Visible Dust swabs and solution and got streaks and it took 6-8 swabs to get my d7000 clean.  Very expensive.  Get a good lighted loupe because it's a pain remounting lens taking photos and looking at them...repeat.

After cleaning my d7k two or three times and my D4 twice, I can get it perfectly clean in 2 or three pec-pads.

Thanks to everyone for Copperhill advice.  I went to their site and very cost effective compared to packaged swabs.

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OP wint Regular Member • Posts: 369
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

scokill wrote:

Mully410 wrote:

+ for Copperhill.  I tried Visible Dust swabs and solution and got streaks and it took 6-8 swabs to get my d7000 clean.  Very expensive.  Get a good lighted loupe because it's a pain remounting lens taking photos and looking at them...repeat.

After cleaning my d7k two or three times and my D4 twice, I can get it perfectly clean in 2 or three pec-pads.

Thanks to everyone for Copperhill advice.  I went to their site and very cost effective compared to packaged swabs.

Which product of the list did you choose?

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kmdmd1 New Member • Posts: 23
Re: kmdmd1

MTT wrote:

So what size wand do you prefer for cleaning a FF sensor? One for the V1 series?

Mark

It has been an education for me with sensor cleaning which started with lubricant on the sensor. First got the sensor loupe and rocket blower and tried all the visible dust solvents and swabs to no avail. Then went to eclipse with sensor swabs. It took a box of swabs and almost got it clean. Then purchased the Copper Hill products and got several different sized sensor wands including the small one for the V1 series and the various sized pec pads. The owner was incredibly helpful on the phone. I found the sensor wand and pec pads and eclipse to be easy and effective. Using a smaller sized wand helped avoid hitting the sides and made it easier getting into the corners and targeting the heavily coated areas of the oil laden sensor. Since that first painful introduction into sensor cleaning I have easily been using the copper hill products which I highly recommend. I want to thank other forum posters (I believe one was Robin Cassidy) who introduced me to copper hill and who helped guide me through the process.

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Full time auto tech, part time photographer. Mark Thompson/MTT
Louisville, KY. USA
Why do you have to 'put your two cents in'.. but it's only a 'penny for your thoughts'? Where's that extra penny going to?
http://markthompsonphotos.com

Funny to see this question right now as I just sat down from cleaning my D800 so the timing is great. Somehow in the pat 6 weeks since I last cleaned, I got another oil spot and a few dust or pollen specks on the sensor. Tonight, I used the 14 mm wand for the first 2 passes, each time with a new pec pad. I chose the smaller wand as it was easier for me to focus on the oil spot which is harder to remove. I then did a final pass with the 18 mm to get rid of any remaining dust and a few lint particles from the first 2 passes.

I use the 8 mm wand for the Nikon 1 V1. This small wand also is good for getting into corners on the FF sensor.

The wands and a set of pec pads for each were relatively inexpensive and it has been well worth the cost for the ease and success with which I have been able to do my own sensor cleaning.

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backupgeek
backupgeek Regular Member • Posts: 126
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

I wet cleaned my D600 myself at around 4000 shots and I really haven't had a dust problem since.   This was after a Nikon cleaning around 2500.  Very glad I cleaned it myself.

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MTT Veteran Member • Posts: 4,954
Re: thanks

To bad you can't buy an assortment of wands in one pack. I was thinking about just buying the strips to put on the end of the wand and not the pec pads since I don't have to fold or cut them to fit. Copper Hill recommends buying the smaller wands until you get used to cleaning the sensor and then buy the right size for your camera. What I'm afraid of when using a wand that don't completely cover the senior is streaks. How do you clean left to right or right to left? I would think you would start on the opposite side of the oil slick so you can wipe the oil towards the edge of the sensor and not towards the middle?

Mark

kmdmd1 wrote:

MTT wrote:

So what size wand do you prefer for cleaning a FF sensor? One for the V1 series?

Mark

It has been an education for me with sensor cleaning which started with lubricant on the sensor. First got the sensor loupe and rocket blower and tried all the visible dust solvents and swabs to no avail. Then went to eclipse with sensor swabs. It took a box of swabs and almost got it clean. Then purchased the Copper Hill products and got several different sized sensor wands including the small one for the V1 series and the various sized pec pads. The owner was incredibly helpful on the phone. I found the sensor wand and pec pads and eclipse to be easy and effective. Using a smaller sized wand helped avoid hitting the sides and made it easier getting into the corners and targeting the heavily coated areas of the oil laden sensor. Since that first painful introduction into sensor cleaning I have easily been using the copper hill products which I highly recommend. I want to thank other forum posters (I believe one was Robin Cassidy) who introduced me to copper hill and who helped guide me through the process.

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This is me Post Processing. If only I can get it right the first time!
Full time auto tech, part time photographer. Mark Thompson/MTT
Louisville, KY. USA
Why do you have to 'put your two cents in'.. but it's only a 'penny for your thoughts'? Where's that extra penny going to?
http://markthompsonphotos.com

Funny to see this question right now as I just sat down from cleaning my D800 so the timing is great. Somehow in the pat 6 weeks since I last cleaned, I got another oil spot and a few dust or pollen specks on the sensor. Tonight, I used the 14 mm wand for the first 2 passes, each time with a new pec pad. I chose the smaller wand as it was easier for me to focus on the oil spot which is harder to remove. I then did a final pass with the 18 mm to get rid of any remaining dust and a few lint particles from the first 2 passes.

I use the 8 mm wand for the Nikon 1 V1. This small wand also is good for getting into corners on the FF sensor.

The wands and a set of pec pads for each were relatively inexpensive and it has been well worth the cost for the ease and success with which I have been able to do my own sensor cleaning.

-- hide signature --

http://mtt.smugmug.com/photos/245519815-O.gif
This is me Post Processing. If only I can get it right the first time!
Full time auto tech, part time photographer. Mark Thompson/MTT
Louisville, KY. USA
Why do you have to 'put your two cents in'.. but it's only a 'penny for your thoughts'? Where's that extra penny going to?
http://markthompsonphotos.com

wireless
wireless Contributing Member • Posts: 503
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

Like the others said, try Copperhill.  It takes a little practice.  First time I used about 7 swabs I think.

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Ernie Misner
Ernie Misner Veteran Member • Posts: 3,465
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

First passes can be left to right, then up and down.    The copper hill directions show several ways to do it.   Streaks don't seem to be a problem with slightly small swabs.  The oil is soaked up and eveporated to smithereens but it will take a few passes for sure.   The only problem I had was a few material fragments remaining on the sensor.   A blast of air from the can removed those fine.   (sit the can flat on the table, no shaking, etc., then position the camera so as to meet the blast of air as the can sits flat on the table.... flat, flat, so no liquid exits the can, just air.)

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OP wint Regular Member • Posts: 369
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

Whick one to buy: The QuickStraps or the PecPads?

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1w12q312qw1 Contributing Member • Posts: 732
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

wint wrote:

Whick one to buy: The QuickStraps or the PecPads?

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If my language it is not clear, excuse me, the English is just my third language.

It's no contest as far as I'm concerned, Quikstrips are incredibly easy to use. You don't have to fold them like Pecpads which really bunch up around the swipe.

No need to apologize, this is an international meeting place. I wish I could speak 3 languages, heck, I have enough trouble with English.

Stan

jabber54 Forum Member • Posts: 88
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

kmdmd1 wrote:

It has been an education for me with sensor cleaning which started with lubricant on the sensor. First got the sensor loupe and rocket blower and tried all the visible dust solvents and swabs to no avail. Then went to eclipse with sensor swabs. It took a box of swabs and almost got it clean. Then purchased the Copper Hill products and got several different sized sensor wands including the small one for the V1 series and the various sized pec pads. The owner was incredibly helpful on the phone. I found the sensor wand and pec pads and eclipse to be easy and effective. Using a smaller sized wand helped avoid hitting the sides and made it easier getting into the corners and targeting the heavily coated areas of the oil laden sensor. Since that first painful introduction into sensor cleaning I have easily been using the copper hill products which I highly recommend. I want to thank other forum posters (I believe one was Robin Cassidy) who introduced me to copper hill and who helped guide me through the process.

I am contemplating purchasing a D600 but I am a little apprehensive about wet sensor cleaning which I have never done before.  How much pressure do you need to apply to the wand when you run it across the sensor?

1w12q312qw1 Contributing Member • Posts: 732
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

jabber54 wrote:

kmdmd1 wrote:

It has been an education for me with sensor cleaning which started with lubricant on the sensor. First got the sensor loupe and rocket blower and tried all the visible dust solvents and swabs to no avail. Then went to eclipse with sensor swabs. It took a box of swabs and almost got it clean. Then purchased the Copper Hill products and got several different sized sensor wands including the small one for the V1 series and the various sized pec pads. The owner was incredibly helpful on the phone. I found the sensor wand and pec pads and eclipse to be easy and effective. Using a smaller sized wand helped avoid hitting the sides and made it easier getting into the corners and targeting the heavily coated areas of the oil laden sensor. Since that first painful introduction into sensor cleaning I have easily been using the copper hill products which I highly recommend. I want to thank other forum posters (I believe one was Robin Cassidy) who introduced me to copper hill and who helped guide me through the process.

I am contemplating purchasing a D600 but I am a little apprehensive about wet sensor cleaning which I have never done before.  How much pressure do you need to apply to the wand when you run it across the sensor?

About like writing with a pen or pencil. When I first started swabbing I didn't use enough pressure, I guess I was a little timid. But from what I understand, these AA filters are pretty tough and can tolerate more force than I would consider using.

Stan

Lobo93065 Regular Member • Posts: 162
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

I'm concerned about Pec Pads and the manufacturer's statement not to use them for sensor cleaning. Also, CopperHill says quickstrips are Pec Pads cut to a size more suitable for sensor cleaning, so I have the same concern with quickstrips.

Would anyone care to comment on why the manufacturer is saying this?

I really like being able to re-use the wands with Pec Pads, but I'd like to know are there any alternatives similar to Pec Pads that are approved by the manufacturer for sensor cleaning?

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Lobo93065 Regular Member • Posts: 162
deleted -wrong location

No text.

Lobo93065 Regular Member • Posts: 162
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

Sorry, that previous post is in the wrong location. I guess there is no delete option!

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1w12q312qw1 Contributing Member • Posts: 732
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

Lobo93065 wrote:

I'm concerned about Pec Pads and the manufacturer's statement not to use them for sensor cleaning. Also, CopperHill says quickstrips are Pec Pads cut to a size more suitable for sensor cleaning, so I have the same concern with quickstrips.

Would anyone care to comment on why the manufacturer is saying this

Because they want you to buy Sensorswabs.

OP wint Regular Member • Posts: 369
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

1w12q312qw1 wrote:

Lobo93065 wrote:

I'm concerned about Pec Pads and the manufacturer's statement not to use them for sensor cleaning. Also, CopperHill says quickstrips are Pec Pads cut to a size more suitable for sensor cleaning, so I have the same concern with quickstrips.

Would anyone care to comment on why the manufacturer is saying this

Because they want you to buy Sensorswabs.

Make sense!

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Lobo93065 Regular Member • Posts: 162
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?

1w12q312qw1 wrote:

Lobo93065 wrote:

I'm concerned about Pec Pads and the manufacturer's statement not to use them for sensor cleaning. Also, CopperHill says quickstrips are Pec Pads cut to a size more suitable for sensor cleaning, so I have the same concern with quickstrips.

Would anyone care to comment on why the manufacturer is saying this

Because they want you to buy Sensorswabs.

You might be right, but my experience tells me not to be cynical. Here are just two examples:

A mechanic told me I needed to replace a plastic part on my car (something I eventually learned to do myself) because it was old enough that it would fail soon. I was convinced he just wanted to sell labor and parts. I was wrong! Within a year or two it failed. Fortunately, after the failure, I didn't need to replace the head or the engine, but everything pointed to that until I asked a few simple questions at another shop.

My vet told me to have my dog's teeth cleaned regularly. I was convinced he only wanted to sell services. I was wrong. The dog developed oral cancer that would have been discovered at a treatable stage if I had listened to the vet.

Some questions just need to be asked. Some concerns are worth raising, even if they are nothing to worry about after all.

Also, my wife accuses me of always thinking of the worst case scenario. I can't help myself 

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Boschje Contributing Member • Posts: 667
Re: Who here got rid of all dust on their sensor with wet cleaning?
1

2 words... Practice and patience... You will get better at cleaning when you clean your sensor regulary. I use the copperhill method on both the D3 and D4.

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