Bird in flight with D90

Started Mar 31, 2013 | Discussions
Huyen Olson
OP Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,447
Re: Bird in flight with D90

Thank you for the clarification.  I was merely trying to explain how my camera was set not trying to defend myself as you have said.  It is true that I like to show my bird on an unobstructed background and the overcast sky seemed to please me quite a bit.  I will shoot the sky only if it was interesting but just a blue sky, I often stay away from it.  Here is how my camera was set, Aperture priority at F5, AF-C, burst mode, Auto AE, ISO 200, matric metering, 1/3 EV, and fine tune exposure set at +3/6 (I believe this could be the problem).

If you gentlemen could give me better tips on what the best setting would be for my next challenge, I would appreciate it since we are going back to the birds this Thursday.  Have no choice, it's another field trip before they close down for the summer.

Thank you all in advance.  It has been a good lesson to learn.

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Olympus Stylus SH-2 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
the Mtn Man Regular Member • Posts: 153
Re: Spot Metering worth a try
1

nfpotter wrote:

the Mtn Man wrote:

Huyen Olson wrote:

by the way, it was set at matrix metering and at 1/3 EV

That sounds about right.  Matrix metering seems to do a pretty decent job in most situations, and +1/3 EV would be a full stop over-exposed which is why your pictures look so bright.  Next time try it without exposure compensation and just let matrix metering do its thing.  Alternatively, go full manual and carefully meter the scene yourself.

Um, no.  +1/3 is ONE THIRD OF A STOP, not a full stop, and has almost no bearing on why the OP's shot is over-exposed.  Please don't given advice until you know what you're talking about.

Looks like our resident jerk is back.

So how's life treating you?  Still getting up on the wrong side of the bed? 

But, yeah, I misspoke.  He wrote +1/3 EV and I somehow read it as +1 EV.  The point, however, is that he bumped up his exposure which could lead to washed out pictures.

nfpotter Veteran Member • Posts: 4,080
Re: Spot Metering worth a try

the Mtn Man wrote:

nfpotter wrote:

the Mtn Man wrote:

Huyen Olson wrote:

by the way, it was set at matrix metering and at 1/3 EV

That sounds about right.  Matrix metering seems to do a pretty decent job in most situations, and +1/3 EV would be a full stop over-exposed which is why your pictures look so bright.  Next time try it without exposure compensation and just let matrix metering do its thing.  Alternatively, go full manual and carefully meter the scene yourself.

Um, no.  +1/3 is ONE THIRD OF A STOP, not a full stop, and has almost no bearing on why the OP's shot is over-exposed.  Please don't given advice until you know what you're talking about.

Looks like our resident jerk is back.

So how's life treating you?  Still getting up on the wrong side of the bed? 

But, yeah, I misspoke.  I was thinking of something else.  The point, however, is that he bumped up his exposure which could lead to washed out pictures.

I'm having a good day, how about yourself?

the Mtn Man Regular Member • Posts: 153
Re: Spot Metering worth a try

nfpotter wrote:

the Mtn Man wrote:

nfpotter wrote:

the Mtn Man wrote:

Huyen Olson wrote:

by the way, it was set at matrix metering and at 1/3 EV

That sounds about right.  Matrix metering seems to do a pretty decent job in most situations, and +1/3 EV would be a full stop over-exposed which is why your pictures look so bright.  Next time try it without exposure compensation and just let matrix metering do its thing.  Alternatively, go full manual and carefully meter the scene yourself.

Um, no.  +1/3 is ONE THIRD OF A STOP, not a full stop, and has almost no bearing on why the OP's shot is over-exposed.  Please don't given advice until you know what you're talking about.

Looks like our resident jerk is back.

So how's life treating you?  Still getting up on the wrong side of the bed? 

But, yeah, I misspoke.  I was thinking of something else.  The point, however, is that he bumped up his exposure which could lead to washed out pictures.

I'm having a good day, how about yourself?

Dare I suggest he set exposure with a grey card next time?

nfpotter Veteran Member • Posts: 4,080
Re: Spot Metering worth a try

the Mtn Man wrote:

nfpotter wrote:

the Mtn Man wrote:

nfpotter wrote:

the Mtn Man wrote:

Huyen Olson wrote:

by the way, it was set at matrix metering and at 1/3 EV

That sounds about right.  Matrix metering seems to do a pretty decent job in most situations, and +1/3 EV would be a full stop over-exposed which is why your pictures look so bright.  Next time try it without exposure compensation and just let matrix metering do its thing.  Alternatively, go full manual and carefully meter the scene yourself.

Um, no.  +1/3 is ONE THIRD OF A STOP, not a full stop, and has almost no bearing on why the OP's shot is over-exposed.  Please don't given advice until you know what you're talking about.

Looks like our resident jerk is back.

So how's life treating you?  Still getting up on the wrong side of the bed? 

But, yeah, I misspoke.  I was thinking of something else.  The point, however, is that he bumped up his exposure which could lead to washed out pictures.

I'm having a good day, how about yourself?

Dare I suggest he set exposure with a grey card next time?

Lol.  Nice.

Huyen Olson
OP Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,447
Re: Thanks for the site

Why shoot something when my assignment called for birds in flight?  In my opinion, catching birds in flight is easy said than done.  I'd rather try various settings as suggested here and keep shooting until it is perfect without having to pp.  My days are filled with work and grandkid so I don't have the luxury to sit in front of my computer like you folks here.

Some of you have given me great tips which I will be using them this coming Thursday.  Wish me luck?

Thanks to all

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Olympus Stylus SH-2 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
trumpyman Regular Member • Posts: 307
Re: I agree
1

:-)Ye ,after i posted the pics i adjusted my monitor and i wouldve deleted them if i could.Why are you giving him advice when you cant take photos of BIF youself.You admitted before your mighty Bigma focus is to slow. Once again you show what a rude ,miserable person you are. Keep smiling,if you know what a smile is.At least the poster of the thread got the BIF ,you would have had to wait for it to land and pose for you.

Thnx Paul

Brev00
Brev00 Veteran Member • Posts: 9,210
Re: Thanks for the site

Maybe you can get to the site before the release of the birds so you can meter the scene, take a few shots, check your histogram, and adjust your settings.  Its nice to have that stuff out of the way so you can concentrate on nailing focus.  If you shoot raw, you have some added leeway correcting exposure later.

-- hide signature --

www.flickr.com/photos/brev00

 Brev00's gear list:Brev00's gear list
Nikon D90 Nikon D7100 Nikon D610 Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D Tokina AT-X Pro 12-24mm f/4 DX II +4 more
Huyen Olson
OP Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,447
Re: Thanks for the site

Yes I will.  The first flight takes place at 10am before the harshness of the sun.  Thanks again.

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Olympus Stylus SH-2 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
Huyen Olson
OP Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,447
Re: Thanks for the site

BTW, the birds will be flying high against a white sky at that hour, that said, what metering would you suggest I use, should it be spot as suggested here?

Thanks

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Olympus Stylus SH-2 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
Brev00
Brev00 Veteran Member • Posts: 9,210
Re: Thanks for the site

If the sky is the brightest element in the scene, I would spot meter the sky to set an exposure as I described before.  You can't spot meter the bird, obviously, before it arrives, and if you do, you will blow the sky again.  Underexposing the bird is ok because those shadows can be lifted.  Once you blow the sky, it is gone.

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 Brev00's gear list:Brev00's gear list
Nikon D90 Nikon D7100 Nikon D610 Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D Tokina AT-X Pro 12-24mm f/4 DX II +4 more
Huyen Olson
OP Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,447
Re: Thanks for the site

Great! thanks

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Olympus Stylus SH-2 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
Huyen Olson
OP Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,447
Re: Thanks for the site

I was thinking, would a ND filter work?

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Olympus Stylus SH-2 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
nfpotter Veteran Member • Posts: 4,080
Re: I agree

trumpyman wrote:

:-)Ye ,after i posted the pics i adjusted my monitor and i wouldve deleted them if i could.Why are you giving him advice when you cant take photos of BIF youself.You admitted before your mighty Bigma focus is to slow. Once again you show what a rude ,miserable person you are. Keep smiling,if you know what a smile is.At least the poster of the thread got the BIF ,you would have had to wait for it to land and pose for you.

Thnx Paul

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51197470

LMAO.  Easy, trumpyman, we know why you picked that name.

Huyen Olson
OP Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,447
Re: Spot metering

After your post I decided to take a good look at my camera setting regarding spot metering, and here is my response to you.  The metering was set on matrix and exposure to +3/6, I don't know why I never looked at that before but thanks to you, it is engraved in my brain.  I will definitely try the spot metering as suggested by several people and will bring along the grey card, may be tomorrow I will get some nicer shots.  Will post if anything good.  Lesson learned and thanks to you all.

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Olympus Stylus SH-2 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
the Mtn Man Regular Member • Posts: 153
Re: Thanks for the site

Huyen Olson wrote:

I was thinking, would a ND filter work?

Work for what?  It would reduce the light coming into your lens, but you could accomplish the same thing by reducing your exposure, so I don't see why that would be necessary in this case.  An ND would be useful if you wanted, say, to maintain a slow shutter speed under bright light without having to close down your iris or change your ISO.

Huyen Olson
OP Huyen Olson Senior Member • Posts: 1,447
Re: Thanks for the site

Thanks for reminding me, it would work well if I were to take photos of a waterfall on a brightly lid day.  I forgot!

 Huyen Olson's gear list:Huyen Olson's gear list
Olympus Stylus SH-2 Nikon D7100 Sony a6000
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