Photographers speak in tongues

Started Mar 28, 2013 | Discussions
chris_uk
chris_uk Contributing Member • Posts: 761
Re: Photographers speak in tongues
1

When anyone uses the phrase "Holy Trinity" when they are talking about Nikon lenses, I just feel sorry for them.

Mike_PEAT Forum Pro • Posts: 12,919
nt)lense is a legit spelling, look it up!

nt=No text

nelsonal Senior Member • Posts: 2,464
Re: Photographers speak in tongues

Every subculture develops jargon partly to separate and identify the group members from others.  It also helps to shorten expressions (imagine if we all typed the full names of every lens we talk about, ie rather than kit lens or Nikon 18-105 or something short we all typed out "Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR".

jonikon Veteran Member • Posts: 5,945
Re: Photographers speak in tongues

meland wrote:

Rapid evolution since the advent of digital has resulted in photographers that can no longer speak proper.

Words such as Panny, Siggy, Oly and Cannikon have sneaked (snuck?) into the vocabulary.  Strangely Sony does not seem to have been subjected to this treatment.  Perhaps the shortening to "Get a Son" doesn't really work.

That's because "Canikon" is a pejorative used by envious Sony owners that resent the only two successful DSLR camera makers in the world. I understand their envy,  resentment, and frustration better than most though,  because  I was once invested in Sony DSLRs  before I understood what it takes to make a good DSLR camera system.

Nauseating phrases like 'Nifty fifty' and 'Holy trinity' seem to have taken over otherwise normal people's brains.

I agree, these should go

'Lens' has become 'lense', or perhaps that's just from watching too much Miss Piggy. "Pretentious? Moi?"

Not sure, but I believe that is an alternative spelling in some countries anyway.

Cameras have become 'cams'.  Lenses - 'glass'.  And yes, yes I know that's what they're made of.  As do most people but they don't refer to sensors as 'silicon' do they?  But give them time they might.  And they might even change that to 'silly'.

I bought my first SLR over 40 years ago and the salesman that sold me that camera used the term "better glass" instead of a better lenses. So nothing new there. Actually better glass may be more accurate as there are many glass elements that make up a camera "lens".  

Please pass me the sick bucket.

And here are some other annoying terms and sayings to add fuel to the fire:

  • Pulled the trigger (gun nut referring to purchasing something, but probably not a gun)
  • Tack sharp, (which is painful!)
  • Pixel peeping, (only to be done in the privacy of ones own home of course!)
  • Fast glass, (instead of large aperture lens)
  • fanboy, (a pejorative for those who love their equipment!) 
  • Sub frame (for underwater use, evidently!) 
  • Blows away (whatever). Used by those that also "Pull the trigger"!
  • Destroys, (whatever). See above.
  • Miles, or streets ahead ( of whatever). Used by former runners.
  • Not even in the same class (of whatever). Used by snobs.
  • Great shots! (referring to very mediocre photos take with a $3000 camera)
  • Congrats, (on buying a new camera, lens, etc., which very few on the forums have actually done, apparently)
  • Noisy (as opposed to quiet images)
  • Clean (as opposed to dirty images)
  • OOF (out of focus, not a punch in the face!)
  • Equivalent focal length (as opposed to separate but equal focal lengths)
  • Pics (not nose type!)
  • (fill in the blank) 

"Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain! The Great Oz has spoken!"
- Jon

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Draek
Draek Senior Member • Posts: 2,028
Re: Photographers speak in tongues

Since the advent of digital? you're crazy.

Also, given the horrors you inflicted upon the English language on your own post, you're hardly qualified to be criticizing anyone else's use of jargon and neologisms.

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Hugowolf Forum Pro • Posts: 12,674
Re: nt)lense is a legit spelling, look it up!
2

Mike_PEAT wrote:

nt=No text

And there is another one: legit.

There is nothing legal or illegal about it. Dictionaries, for the most part, catalogue use. It is in there because it has unfortunately fallen into use. It is as seriously ridiculous as Ye Olde Sweete Shoppe.

Brian A

OP (unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 5,590
Re: Photographers speak in tongues

Draek wrote:

Since the advent of digital? you're crazy.

Also, given the horrors you inflicted upon the English language on your own post, you're hardly qualified to be criticizing anyone else's use of jargon and neologisms.

Excluding the one horror deliberately inserted in order to emphasise the point, which may have gone right over your head of course, perhaps you would like to point out the others?

SirLataxe
SirLataxe Veteran Member • Posts: 3,866
Re: Photographers speak in tongues
1

meland wrote:

Rapid evolution since the advent of digital has resulted in photographers that can no longer speak proper.

Words such as Panny, Siggy, Oly and Cannikon have sneaked (snuck?) into the vocabulary.  Strangely Sony does not seem to have been subjected to this treatment.  Perhaps the shortening to "Get a Son" doesn't really work.

Nauseating phrases like 'Nifty fifty' and 'Holy trinity' seem to have taken over otherwise normal people's brains.

'Lens' has become 'lense', or perhaps that's just from watching too much Miss Piggy. "Pretentious? Moi?"

Cameras have become 'cams'.  Lenses - 'glass'.  And yes, yes I know that's what they're made of.  As do most people but they don't refer to sensors as 'silicon' do they?  But give them time they might.  And they might even change that to 'silly'.

Please pass me the sick bucket.

Mr Land,

To those of us browbeaten (or just beaten) into linguistic and grammatical conformity by Mr Brown, English Master of a certain 1960s Grammar School for Boys, many of today's jargon-ridden words and phrases cause angst or irritation.  My own particular bugbears are those Americanisms generated from their gun-toting kulture.

  • The "killer deal". Does the customer murder the vendor to obtain the goods or vice-versa (shopkeeper kills the bloke for his wallet)?  If not, what is it that gets killed?  It's a puzzle.
  • "Pulling the trigger".  Is this an elaboration on the murderous transaction of a "killer deal"?  Do Americans have triggers on their wallets? How often do they shoot themselves in the leg via premature wallet-trigger pulling?
  • "Shooting photos" or "shots".  Shurely shome mishtake as the photons arrive from out there into the camera, not vice-versa.  Perhaps they are "shooting" their egos via some delusional solipisitic belief that their framing a view somehow projects & constructs the stuff that is in it? They do tend to be individualistas, to a Man!

Anyroadup, I greatly enjoy allowing these peculiar phrases of the gun-fetishists to vaguely annoy my Brownian sense of Correct English, so I suppose I should be grateful.

SirLataxe, never fond of macho-lingo or the postures that generate it. (And my mule don't like it either).

OP (unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 5,590
Re: Photographers speak in tongues

jonikon wrote:


And here are some other annoying terms and sayings to add fuel to the fire:

  • Pulled the trigger (gun nut referring to purchasing something, but probably not a gun)
  • Tack sharp, (which is painful!)
  • Pixel peeping, (only to be done in the privacy of ones own home of course!)
  • Fast glass, (instead of large aperture lens)
  • fanboy, (a pejorative for those who love their equipment!) 
  • Sub frame (for underwater use, evidently!) 
  • Blows away (whatever). Used by those that also "Pull the trigger"!
  • Destroys, (whatever). See above.
  • Miles, or streets ahead ( of whatever). Used by former runners.
  • Not even in the same class (of whatever). Used by snobs.
  • Great shots! (referring to very mediocre photos take with a $3000 camera)
  • Congrats, (on buying a new camera, lens, etc., which very few on the forums have actually done, apparently)
  • Noisy (as opposed to quiet images)
  • Clean (as opposed to dirty images)
  • OOF (out of focus, not a punch in the face!)
  • Equivalent focal length (as opposed to separate but equal focal lengths)
  • Pics (not nose type!)
  • (fill in the blank) 

"Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain! The Great Oz has spoken!"
- Jon

I am unable to disagree with most of those.  

Hugowolf Forum Pro • Posts: 12,674
Re: Photographers speak in tongues
1

meland wrote:

Rapid evolution since the advent of digital has resulted in photographers that can no longer speak proper...

Photographers are no worse than anyone else and it isn't just since the recent popularity of digital cameras, although the use of International Standards Organization to describe senor sensitivity is a little funny. Like all the ISO does is camera sensor related? But it derives from a similar use of ASA in film days.

There is shutter speed. Focal plane shutter curtains do travel at a speed, but I am pretty sure duration would be a better term for what is meant. Fast lens is another good one, just hard to catch those little b's, they move so quickly. Prime is another; originally the go to standard 50 mm lens, now strangely used for all fixed focal length lenses – and hence making it possible to have more than one prime.

Please pass me the sick bucket.

I have found single malt Scotch to be a better cure. It doesn't make these ridiculous terms any better, but you don't care about them any more. It does, however, wear off, so there is a need to repeat the treatment.

Brian A

OP (unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 5,590
Re: Photographers speak in tongues

SirLataxe wrote:

Mr Land,

To those of us browbeaten (or just beaten) into linguistic and grammatical conformity by Mr Brown, English Master of a certain 1960s Grammar School for Boys, many of today's jargon-ridden words and phrases cause angst or irritation.  My own particular bugbears are those Americanisms generated from their gun-toting kulture.

  • The "killer deal". Does the customer murder the vendor to obtain the goods or vice-versa (shopkeeper kills the bloke for his wallet)?  If not, what is it that gets killed?  It's a puzzle.
  • "Pulling the trigger".  Is this an elaboration on the murderous transaction of a "killer deal"?  Do Americans have triggers on their wallets? How often do they shoot themselves in the leg via premature wallet-trigger pulling?
  • "Shooting photos" or "shots".  Shurely shome mishtake as the photons arrive from out there into the camera, not vice-versa.  Perhaps they are "shooting" their egos via some delusional solipisitic belief that their framing a view somehow projects & constructs the stuff that is in it? They do tend to be individualistas, to a Man!

Anyroadup, I greatly enjoy allowing these peculiar phrases of the gun-fetishists to vaguely annoy my Brownian sense of Correct English, so I suppose I should be grateful.

SirLataxe, never fond of macho-lingo or the postures that generate it. (And my mule don't like it either).

My English master, Mr Molton, sounds very similar.

OP (unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 5,590
Re: Photographers speak in tongues

Hugowolf wrote:

meland wrote:

Rapid evolution since the advent of digital has resulted in photographers that can no longer speak proper...

Photographers are no worse than anyone else and it isn't just since the recent popularity of digital cameras, although the use of International Standards Organization to describe senor sensitivity is a little funny. Like all the ISO does is camera sensor related? But it derives from a similar use of ASA in film days.

There is shutter speed. Focal plane shutter curtains do travel at a speed, but I am pretty sure duration would be a better term for what is meant. Fast lens is another good one, just hard to catch those little b's, they move so quickly. Prime is another; originally the go to standard 50 mm lens, now strangely used for all fixed focal length lenses – and hence making it possible to have more than one prime.

Please pass me the sick bucket.

I have found single malt Scotch to be a better cure.

Excellent advice.

It doesn't make these ridiculous terms any better, but you don't care about them any more. It does, however, wear off, so there is a need to repeat the treatment.

Brian A

JTuuti Forum Member • Posts: 62
Is DPR turning into a forum for crumpy old men?
4

I have been reading so many posts recently about how things used to be so much better, and how sickened everybody is seeing the young people stepping on their lawn.

The photographers have always been in love with their jargon, we are all just so used to it, that we don't even realize that not everybody talks that way.  Just as the SMS generation does not realize that not everybody talks the way they do.

Why don't you try to explain what you are doing to someone completely new to this, and very soon you'll find, that you do not share the common language.  Not so long ago I had to explain to someone that 'noise' is not the sound the camera makes.

I am really glad to read about how the kids are messing with everybody's mind, really.  The thing is, during the 10 years that have passed, there has been a revolution.  We, the old people,  are talking about digital photography; the kids are talking about the emergence of a universe of new possibilities that the combination of all the digital tools they are grown up with can offer them. We have seen the evolution of the tools, we have yet to see what these tools are going to be used for, and a part of that process is for the young to claim their territory as their own, and the language is how it always has been done.

OP (unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 5,590
Re: Is DPR turning into a forum for crumpy old men?

JTuuti wrote:

I have been reading so many posts recently about how things used to be so much better, and how sickened everybody is seeing the young people stepping on their lawn.

The photographers have always been in love with their jargon, we are all just so used to it, that we don't even realize that not everybody talks that way.  Just as the SMS generation does not realize that not everybody talks the way they do.

Why don't you try to explain what you are doing to someone completely new to this, and very soon you'll find, that you do not share the common language.  Not so long ago I had to explain to someone that 'noise' is not the sound the camera makes.

I am really glad to read about how the kids are messing with everybody's mind, really.  The thing is, during the 10 years that have passed, there has been a revolution.  We, the old people,  are talking about digital photography; the kids are talking about the emergence of a universe of new possibilities that the combination of all the digital tools they are grown up with can offer them. We have seen the evolution of the tools, we have yet to see what these tools are going to be used for, and a part of that process is for the young to claim their territory as their own, and the language is how it always has been done.

I expect you are right.  However I also suspect that most of the examples trotted out here are not from younger people at all but from old farts trying very hard indeed to be up to date.

As for text speak and lack of grammar, well that's another issue entirely.  But if it goes on for for more than a couple of lines without any punctuation I can always choose to skip to the next post.

Chuck Lantz Veteran Member • Posts: 4,332
Re: nt)lense is a legit spelling, look it up!
1

Hugowolf wrote:

Mike_PEAT wrote:

nt=No text

And there is another one: legit.

There is nothing legal or illegal about it. Dictionaries, for the most part, catalogue use. It is in there because it has unfortunately fallen into use. It is as seriously ridiculous as Ye Olde Sweete Shoppe.

Brian A

"Lense" is just a variant spelling of "lens."  No pretense involved. There's plenty of ammunition for debate for either version.

It could be argued that the cumlative time saved if we all settled on dropping the "e" at the end of "lense" could be better used, leading perhaps to landing humans on Mars, or curing all disease, achieving whirled peas, and so on.

Who knows what it might lead to. The beginning of an entirely new era could be marked in future retellings of our history by the simple act of all humanity dropping that pesky "e."

Onward and upward!

-- hide signature --

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Graham Meale
Graham Meale Senior Member • Posts: 2,169
Re: Photographers speak in tongues

meland wrote:

have sneaked (snuck?) into the vocabulary

Yes, "sneaked" has well and truly been replaced by "snuck". Sad.

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phaedin
phaedin Senior Member • Posts: 1,623
Re: Photographers speak in tongues
1

1,3,5,7,11....   Primes

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Grevture Veteran Member • Posts: 4,187
One simple question for the OP ...
2

meland wrote:

Rapid evolution since the advent of digital has resulted in photographers that can no longer speak proper.

Lets for a second assume you are correct, and say the photographic language is deteriorating.

Now, at some time back in history, say in the 15th century or so, we did not have any language at all to describe photography, lenses, cameras (sorry, cams) at all. So, it would be safe to say that at some point in our history our language was rather useless for discussing photography.

Now we have two assumptions:

1) At some time in our history our language was ill equipped to handle discussions on photography. Since then it improved.

2) Right now, our language to describe photography is in decline, it gets progressively worse all the time.

Agree so far?

Then, my simple question is, if both assumptions 1) and 2) above is correct, exactly when do you mean the language describing photography was at its peak? 2007? 2001? 1995?

Of course there is no answer to that question. Why? Because your premise, that the language is deteriorating is bogus. Look, language has always been, and will always be a reflection of the reality in which it is used. The reality keep changing over time, and so does the language. That is just how it is.

If anything, one can probably with some truth state that in the grand scheme of things, our language is actually at is best right now. Just as it was ten years ago. Or 50 years ago. Or 300 years ago. We more or less, on a average, always have the language which is most useful for its particular time.

The notion of languages deteriorating is just resentment of change.

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By the way, film is not dead.
It just smell funny

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OP (unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 5,590
A simple reply for Grevture

Grevture wrote:

meland wrote:

Rapid evolution since the advent of digital has resulted in photographers that can no longer speak proper.

Lets for a second assume you are correct, and say the photographic language is deteriorating.

Now, at some time back in history, say in the 15th century or so, we did not have any language at all to describe photography, lenses, cameras (sorry, cams) at all. So, it would be safe to say that at some point in our history our language was rather useless for discussing photography.

Now we have two assumptions:

1) At some time in our history our language was ill equipped to handle discussions on photography. Since then it improved.

2) Right now, our language to describe photography is in decline, it gets progressively worse all the time.

Agree so far?

Then, my simple question is, if both assumptions 1) and 2) above is correct, exactly when do you mean the language describing photography was at its peak? 2007? 2001? 1995?

Of course there is no answer to that question. Why? Because your premise, that the language is deteriorating is bogus. Look, language has always been, and will always be a reflection of the reality in which it is used. The reality keep changing over time, and so does the language. That is just how it is.

If anything, one can probably with some truth state that in the grand scheme of things, our language is actually at is best right now. Just as it was ten years ago. Or 50 years ago. Or 300 years ago. We more or less, on a average, always have the language which is most useful for its particular time.

The notion of languages deteriorating is just resentment of change.

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I don't suffer from insanity, I enjoy every moment of it!
By the way, film is not dead.
It just smell funny

It was not intended to be taken so seriously.  But thank you anyway.

Grevture Veteran Member • Posts: 4,187
Oops

meland wrote:

It was not intended to be taken so seriously.  But thank you anyway.

I always take language seriously - its my work

Now, not being a native English speaker sometimes make me oblivious to irony or sarcasm. So I probably misread the tone of you post a bit. And I am used to debate the issue of deteriorating language quite a lot - a surprising number of people actually get all steamed up complaining that 'the language just get worse and worse'.

Language(s) fascinates me, and I want to say to all you English speakers out there: Be grateful you are using one of the most living and ever changing languages on the planet. Ability to change as reality changes - adopt and overcome in US Marine parlance - is what keeps a language alive and relevant.

-- hide signature --

I don't suffer from insanity, I enjoy every moment of it!
By the way, film is not dead.
It just smell funny

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