Nikon D7100 crop factor

Started Mar 15, 2013 | Discussions
Digirame Forum Pro • Posts: 35,367
Re: Three posts and your out? - Go and enjoy your choice

Congratulations.  I think you made a good choice.  A lot of people have done the same.  I still use my Olympus E-510 camera occasionally, but I moved on to a Canon system now (a little over a year ago).  I think we'll see more and more of this, as long as Olympus continues to fall behind.  It's kind of sad as Olympus has great products.  It was a tough decision for me to move on to something else as I got attached to my Olympus system, with many older cameras and one lens that I purchased used.  Fortunately, I didn't spend a lot of money on them, so it made it easier for me to move on to something else.  We can always hope that Olympus changes things around, but meanwhile it's time for some of us to upgrade to the latest and greatest technology such as you have done.  I watched Kodak do the same when I had my Kodak P&S (1, 3, & 5mp) cameras.  It was then I decided to try something else when I purchased my 6mp Sony H2 (it was a great camera).  When I saw that Kodak decided to stop making DSLR cameras and focus on the smaller P&S cameras, I kind of figured it was the beginning of the end.  Is it the same for Olympus?  I don't know, but I hope not.

SirSeth
SirSeth Veteran Member • Posts: 9,962
Re: Three posts and your out? - Go and enjoy your choice

The D7100 crop mode is really cool. I like that the AF array covers the entire area. I think it would be great if Olympus did that on their E-7 giving us 2.5x compared to 35mm. That would make my 50-200mm act like a 100-600mm f2.8-3.5 (with and without crop mode).

That said, jumping up in lens quality will do more for your photography than a new camera imo and as I've already described, good quality Nikon lenses are very expensive while Zuiko HG are a smoking bargain. For example, there's another post where a guy got an E-3, 11-22mm, 14-54mm, 70-300mm, FL-50, FL-36, 4 batteries, and a Billingham Bag for $1400. Everything mint. That's a heck of a system  that if you were going to duplicate in Nikon (glass alone) would be much more expensive. I think you underestimate how good say the E-5 is compared with the E-510. It's old, but light years ahead of the E-510. The D7100 will be better in many ways IQ wise, but the gap between the E-510 and E-5 is very substantial.

That said, there is nothing wrong with going for the D7100. You will just need to put in a lot more money to get the same quality of glass. If you don't have the money and end up skimping on lenses, you simply won't realize the potential of the D7100 no matter how cool it is. But if I had the money, a D7100 + new 80-400mm would be mighty tempting even at the $3700 cost I'd have to pay for the body + one lens. Add another $2000 for good wide and normal.

Cheers,

Seth

-- hide signature --

What if the hokey pokey really is what it's all about?
--
wallygoots.smugmug.com
wallygoots.blogspot.com

 SirSeth's gear list:SirSeth's gear list
Olympus E-1 Fujifilm X-T1 Olympus E-M1 Olympus Zuiko Digital 11-22mm 1:2.8-3.5 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 50-200mm 1:2.8-3.5 SWD +5 more
Craig from Nevada
Craig from Nevada Veteran Member • Posts: 4,593
Re: Nikon D7100 crop factor

Chrisp63 wrote:

Hi,

One of the things I liked about the Olympus system was the sensor size and crop factor which effectively doubles the focal length, great for extending the reach of the lens and getting nice wildlife shots, not so good for landscapes. However since i purchased my E-510 almost 5 years ago I like many others have been disappointed by the lack of investment in the DSLR market compared to the other major competitors, the lack of information seems to disappoint many dedicated Olympus users. I want to upgrade from my beginners E-510 to a better model and have been wondering whether to look elsewhere. I only have 4 lens the most expensive being the 50mm F2 macro which I really like. I have just noticed that Nikon have released the D7100 which as well as a 24mp sensor allows you to switch to a 1.3 crop mode (at 16 mp) which at a press of a button turns it into a 4/3rds camera. Another plus is the lack of a low pass filter supposedly giving sharper images.

I really like my E-510 and the quality of the lens but feel that there is a lack of choice in the Olympus range for me to upgrade to (just the old E5) so have made the choice to get the D7100 rather than wait for a possible E7 that may never arrive.. Seems a shame, I really thought I would stay with Olympus and build up a collection of lens over time but looks like their lack of investment in the 4/3rds market has finally made me move.

Do you think you will be able to take better photographs?

 Craig from Nevada's gear list:Craig from Nevada's gear list
Olympus Tough TG-4 Olympus E-5 Olympus E-620 Olympus E-30 Olympus PEN E-PL6 +20 more
OP Chrisp63 New Member • Posts: 13
Re: Nikon D7100 crop factor

Craig from Nevada wrote:

Chrisp63 wrote:

Hi,

One of the things I liked about the Olympus system was the sensor size and crop factor which effectively doubles the focal length, great for extending the reach of the lens and getting nice wildlife shots, not so good for landscapes. However since i purchased my E-510 almost 5 years ago I like many others have been disappointed by the lack of investment in the DSLR market compared to the other major competitors, the lack of information seems to disappoint many dedicated Olympus users. I want to upgrade from my beginners E-510 to a better model and have been wondering whether to look elsewhere. I only have 4 lens the most expensive being the 50mm F2 macro which I really like. I have just noticed that Nikon have released the D7100 which as well as a 24mp sensor allows you to switch to a 1.3 crop mode (at 16 mp) which at a press of a button turns it into a 4/3rds camera. Another plus is the lack of a low pass filter supposedly giving sharper images.

I really like my E-510 and the quality of the lens but feel that there is a lack of choice in the Olympus range for me to upgrade to (just the old E5) so have made the choice to get the D7100 rather than wait for a possible E7 that may never arrive.. Seems a shame, I really thought I would stay with Olympus and build up a collection of lens over time but looks like their lack of investment in the 4/3rds market has finally made me move.

Do you think you will be able to take better photographs?

I hope to improve myphotography by learning more from more experianced people and experimenting and also by.slowly investing in better gear. I think technically I am improving, I usually now shoot in aperture or full manual mode and spend a lot of time thinking of interesting subjects or angles and backgrounds. The lack of investment in SLR by Olympus is what concerns me and it doesn't look as if it will improve, if I am going to go beyond a beginners SLR and invest then I want a system that is actively developed. yes while I have really enjoyed the e-510 and will probably continue to use it for macro and portrait, I think the Nikon provides the best platform for what I want, I think there are a lot more lens available and  the ommision of the low pass filter will apparently improve the sharpness of the images. Still time will tell. Iwon't get the Nikon until June so have a few more months with the oly only.

Digirame Forum Pro • Posts: 35,367
Re: Thane... it really is the lenses

What a lot of you might not know, is that the Canon Rebel JPEGs are excellent now also.  Dpreview indicates that they are quite good (see the Canon T2i (550D) review for example).  I had to see for myself.  Here's some recent photos of a bird I took at ISO4000 with a Canon kit lens that cost me $150 (USD), as part of a bundled package.  This is similar to what I could get at ISO800 with my Olympus E-510.

To answer another reply, does another brand like the Nikon D7100 help me take better pictures?  Yes, very much so, especially during cloudy and rainy weather.  Eventually, a lot of you are going to find out.  My two Canon DSLR cameras are two generations behind.  I'm looking at what will be produced in the near future which hopefully are much better.  Sony and Nikon are pulling ahead; the Nikon D7100 is impressive.  We'll have to see what the rest of them do.

Here's my Canon ISO4000 out-of-the-camera JPEG photos, minimally post processed with IrfanView (no special noise reduction or extraordinary adjustments), using a kit lens.  This is typically what I did with my Olympus DSLR photos.  I would take JPEGs and just didn't like spending a lot of time with them on the computer.  My focus was taking excellent pictures at the time, concentrating on composition, proper depth of field, shutter speeds and exposure etc.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50976874

Well, I'm off taking pictures today in cloudy weather and some rain (which is typical where I live).  I'll see you all later.

Roger Engelken
Roger Engelken Veteran Member • Posts: 5,306
Re: Nikon D7100 crop factor

Craig from Nevada wrote:

Do you think you will be able to take better photographs?

Now that cuts to the chase and asks the true, bottom line question. In the end the system matters little, it is the results that come from the setup. If it is a setup you enjoy, then chances are you will produce better results. After all, it is the photographer that ultimately captures the image that hopefully conveys the message desired.

 Roger Engelken's gear list:Roger Engelken's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Olympus E-M1 Olympus OM-D E-M10 Olympus E-M1 II Olympus PEN E-P5 +10 more
Craig from Nevada
Craig from Nevada Veteran Member • Posts: 4,593
Re: Nikon D7100 crop factor

Chrisp63 wrote:

Do you think you will be able to take better photographs?

I hope to improve myphotography by learning more from more experianced people and experimenting and also by.slowly investing in better gear. I think technically I am improving, I usually now shoot in aperture or full manual mode and spend a lot of time thinking of interesting subjects or angles and backgrounds. The lack of investment in SLR by Olympus is what concerns me and it doesn't look as if it will improve, if I am going to go beyond a beginners SLR and invest then I want a system that is actively developed. yes while I have really enjoyed the e-510 and will probably continue to use it for macro and portrait, I think the Nikon provides the best platform for what I want, I think there are a lot more lens available and the ommision of the low pass filter will apparently improve the sharpness of the images. Still time will tell. Iwon't get the Nikon until June so have a few more months with the oly only.

The D7100 is a better camera than the Olympus you are using. If you read some of the posts around here there a few guys still using e-500 series camera and taking great photos==Thane and CharlesB are two examples.  Charles post photos taken in concert venues. Concerts and minor league hockey are two of the toughest venues to shoot (IMHO).  Those guys are doing fine

Someone posted a shot the other day of a river scene in Scotland taken with an E-1 and 11-22mm lens.  The fact that I remember the photo and even have given some thought to it long after I viewed it speaks to its merit.  This photo was taken with a relic from the dark ages of digital photography, but the photo worked for me.  There have been some other very fine photos taken with such gear that have been posted here in recent months.

 Craig from Nevada's gear list:Craig from Nevada's gear list
Olympus Tough TG-4 Olympus E-5 Olympus E-620 Olympus E-30 Olympus PEN E-PL6 +20 more
SirSeth
SirSeth Veteran Member • Posts: 9,962
Re: Nikon D7100 crop factor

Chrisp63, so you plan to keep your 50mm f2 and E-510 or sell everything to invest in Nikon? I agree that Olympus has a negligible commitment to DSLRs. Personally, that doesn't put me off because I think it's a great time to be a dual system user. For me, DSLR and mirrorless are perfect companions, but my hope is that Olympus will be able to meld the two. They have said over and over again, that there will be a body for the great 4/3rds lenses. I take that to mean that it will focus them, but not necessarily that it will be a DSLR with optical viewfinder. Translucent or new mirrorless technology that improves C-AF... it's all good so I'm biding time.

If you plan to keep your 4/3rds system for macro have you considered an E-620, E-30, or E-3 upgrade? The tilt-swivel screen is great for macro and the cost for these bodies is ridiculously low. There are good macro lenses in Nikon mount though, and it really sounds like you want to change, so I have nothing to urge on that point.

Best,

Seth

-- hide signature --

What if the hokey pokey really is what it's all about?
--
wallygoots.smugmug.com
wallygoots.blogspot.com

 SirSeth's gear list:SirSeth's gear list
Olympus E-1 Fujifilm X-T1 Olympus E-M1 Olympus Zuiko Digital 11-22mm 1:2.8-3.5 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 50-200mm 1:2.8-3.5 SWD +5 more
Marty4650
Marty4650 Forum Pro • Posts: 14,852
Craig, that really is a meaningless question
4

Craig from Nevada wrote:

Do you think you will be able to take better photographs?

Of course not.

Photographic skill isn't determined by the camera you are holding.

It really is possible to take awful photos with a Nikon D4, and it it also possible to take great photos with a camera phone.

But you are asking a meaningless question.

We both know that a camera like the Nikon D7100 will offer it's user much more capabilities, much better technical quality (but not "artistic quality"), and many more features than the OP's Olympus E510.

If no one wanted better cameras, then we would all be using camera phones and cheap P&S cameras, and no one would even buy something as nice as an Olympus E510.

Craig... are you still using your E510, or did you move up to an E30, E5, or OM-D?

Why did you move up?

I get the feeling that if the OP had traded up to a an E5 (which is also a better camera than the E510) then no one here would be criticizing him and asking "will you take better photographs?" or scrutinizing his posting history.

Instead, they would be congratulating him and telling him what a great decision he made.

These are only tools, and not a religion. No one should be put off if someone has to switch brands to get something newer or better. If anyone is at fault, then blame Olympus for failing to provide the products their customers want.

 Marty4650's gear list:Marty4650's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M5 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1 Olympus E-M1 Panasonic Lumix G 14mm F2.5 ASPH Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 +12 more
Ulfric M Douglas Veteran Member • Posts: 4,818
Re: Nikon D7100 crop factor

Chrisp63 wrote:

... so have made the choice to get the D7100 ...

As a first consumer model to offer this 'crop' I think you have made a good choice : but personally I'd hold off for a couple of months since Nikon's quality control (or design?) has fallen off a cliff recently regarding shutter/mirror assemblies in the D600.

Also : I do hope you're not a Jpeg fan, since my neighbour's D7000 cannot for the life of it make colour Jpegs anything like as pleasing as my old e-410 (or e-600 for that matter).

RAW is the only way to go with Nikon DSLRs in my opinion.

Craig from Nevada
Craig from Nevada Veteran Member • Posts: 4,593
Re: Craig, that really is a meaningless question

M

Caig... are you still using your E510, or did you move up to an E30, E5, or OM-D?

Actually, Marty, I have moved in the opposite direction.  I started with an e-5 and have collected a number of cameras including the e-30, e620 and e-510, which were purchased in that order.  Hard to believe, but on a dollar-for-dollar basis, the used cameras are fabulous values. I worry less and enjoy more.

I picked up the e-510 as part of an Ikelite underwater package on e-bay a few months ago.  I would have preferred an e-620 version, but this deal came along and the price was right.  I have not had the chance to use the underwater housing yet, but I have been pleasantly surprised by the performance of the camera on land.  Not bad.  As I have posted elsewhere on this thread, some people are getting some good results with the camera.  It is not an E-5, but it is capable of producing nice images.  Right now the biggest barrier to better images is me and not the camera.

 Craig from Nevada's gear list:Craig from Nevada's gear list
Olympus Tough TG-4 Olympus E-5 Olympus E-620 Olympus E-30 Olympus PEN E-PL6 +20 more
pris Senior Member • Posts: 2,191
Re: Craig, that really is a meaningless question
2

Marty4650 wrote:

I get the feeling that if the OP had traded up to a an E5 (which is also a better camera than the E510) then no one here would be criticizing him and asking "will you take better photographs?" or scrutinizing his posting history.

No, and rightly so. What you ignore here is that the reason for this scrutinizing is the emerging pattern of "saying good bye without much of a hi first." As with recent thread started by first time poster who registered to say "I am leaving." Kind of hard to take seriously and not to question the motive for the post.

Instead, they would be congratulating him and telling him what a great decision he made.

Why not, it would be. Better yet, as it was pointed out earlier, the best decision would be to wait a few month and see what body and at what price Olympus comes up with and what it does to E-5 price - then make a final decision with all information laid out. Let's see:

- more data about Nikon 7100 and possibly working out first quirks;

- concrete knowledge of a new body, price point and technological direction taken by Olympus;

- seeing new price for E-5;

- possible price decrease for Nikon 7100.

Are all these benefits worth a few months wait, and create much better platform for a decision?

But no, this place again and again becomes a Hotel California where whoever checks out never leaves anyway, and too many are too happy to regurgitate this stale crap about "dead system."

britcam
britcam Senior Member • Posts: 2,462
Re: Nikon D7100 crop factor

Don't forget the Pentax line-up.  The current K5II and K5IIs (without AA filter) both have the same sensor as the D7000, and the forthcoming K3 is expected to have the same 24mb sensor as the D7100.

Between the D7100 and the K5IIs there are a number of significant differences such as WR, in body  stabilisation, size of body, different handling characteristics etc, so a careful look at both Nikon & Pentax would be a good thing to do in your circumstances.

Don't forget the K30 either - best DSLR value by a mile, with the same sensor as the K5, WR and focus peaking, all for around £460 new. Then invest in the lenses and steadily build a system that works for you. Have no doubt that the current line up of cameras with the latest technology, ultra low noise, and low light capabilities will open your eyes and offer many more shooting possibilities than you have been used to.  As another poster said, it is not just all about the lenses - it is the other part of the equation - the body, and the sensor technology, that contributes so much. On that point, Oly have been left way behind I am sad to say.

-- hide signature --

Kind regards
britcam

 britcam's gear list:britcam's gear list
Fujifilm X-E2 Ricoh GR Digital IV Fujifilm X-M1 Fujifilm XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS Fujifilm XF 35mm F1.4 R +6 more
dave gaines
dave gaines Veteran Member • Posts: 9,183
Marty, this post is why people leave Olympus
1

And not just your post Marty. A lot of naysayers have been proclaiming Olympus 4/3 is a dead system. They've kept it up every since Oly did not release another DSLR immediately after releasing the E-5 (only 3 yers ago). But if you look at the chain of events that have beset Olympus, the global economy, a Tsunami and an accounting debacle that plunged their stock value, it's not hard to understand why Oly has not released any new DSLRs in addition to the Pens and OM-D they were already developing.

If the OP came around for the first time and read posts like yours he'd want to abandon Olympus.

The E-5 was a great value when it was released. It answered most of the calls from loyal Olympus 4/3 users for a greatly reduced AA filter, the newer sensor that was already in the E-30, A new media card format to replace the xD card, and better resolution for those SHG lenses. When it was released, early adopters praised it in large numbers. Now it needs an upgrade to include the latest Sony Sensor or one better than what's in the OM-D so it can compete with the likes of a D7100, etc. For what they are selling for used, it is still a great value.

But now Olympus has verified that a new DSLR is coming later this year. We just don't know if it will be an entry level model E-xxx, E-xx or a new Pro level E-7, or one of each.

Olympus is still a good value for photo enthusiasts. The great optics are affordable. Telephoto lenses are much more affordable with Olympus than FF and easier to achive long reach than with APS-C sensors like the D7100. IBIS means every Olympus lens is image stabalized, unlike Canon and Nikon which make you pay a premium for it with every lens. The IQ of the 50 mm f/2, 14-54 mm and 50-200 mm are great values.

My post to the OP above was all about the added cost of abandoning Olympus and buying into Nikon APS-C. And the upgrade path for Nikon is an expensive D600, D800 or D4, with a whole new set of fast, f/2.8 lenses. If the OP buys DX format lensesthat are designed for APS-C , comparable to the Olympus kit lenses he has now, then he'll have to replace those DX lenses when and if he wants to upgrade to full frame.

-- hide signature --

Dave

 dave gaines's gear list:dave gaines's gear list
Olympus C-8080 Wide Zoom Olympus E-330 Nikon D800E Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +7 more
Marty4650
Marty4650 Forum Pro • Posts: 14,852
Re: Marty, this post is why people leave Olympus

dave gaines wrote:

And not just your post Marty. A lot of naysayers have been proclaiming Olympus 4/3 is a dead system. They've kept it up every since Oly did not release another DSLR immediately after releasing the E-5 (only 3 yers ago). But if you look at the chain of events that have beset Olympus, the global economy, a Tsunami and an accounting debacle that plunged their stock value, it's not hard to understand why Oly has not released any new DSLRs in addition to the Pens and OM-D they were already developing.

If the OP came around for the first time and read posts like yours he'd want to abandon Olympus.

Look.... lets be honest here. There is nothing we can say on an internet forum that will impact Olympus' marketing and sales decisions.

Some of you folks are giving the realists among us way too much credit.

And I believe that tsunami affected everyone, not just Olympus. I believe both Sony and Nikon lost production facilities. Olympus was not directly affected, although there certainly must have been some secondary effects. Look at the timeline:

  • 5/2008 - Last newly designed 4/3 lens, the 9-18mm
  • 5/2008 - Last 4/3 lens released. An updated version of the 14-54mm from 2003
  • 2/2009 - Last newly designed 4/3 camera released, the E620
  • 9/2010 - Last 4/3 body released. An updated version of the E3 from 2007
  • 4/2011 - Massive earthquake off Indonesian shore causes tsunami to hit Japan

The E-5 was a great value when it was released. It answered most of the calls from loyal Olympus 4/3 users for a greatly reduced AA filter, the newer sensor that was already in the E-30, A new media card format to replace the xD card, and better resolution for those SHG lenses. When it was released, early adopters praised it in large numbers. Now it needs an upgrade to include the latest Sony Sensor or one better than what's in the OM-D so it can compete with the likes of a D7100, etc. For what they are selling for used, it is still a great value.

Rather than waiting to see if there will be an upgrade that can compete with the likes of the D7100, the OP decided to buy a D7100. I think that was a wise decision.

But now Olympus has verified that a new DSLR is coming later this year. We just don't know if it will be an entry level model E-xxx, E-xx or a new Pro level E-7, or one of each.

Or perhaps it will be a M4/3 camera with some sort of hybrid AF? Is the glass half empty, or is it completely empty? No one knows for sure.

Olympus is still a good value for photo enthusiasts. The great optics are affordable. Telephoto lenses are much more affordable with Olympus than FF and easier to achive long reach than with APS-C sensors like the D7100.

The E5 was a high end niche product. So are those wonderful SHG lenses. Olympus got out of the value market when they stopped selling E520 two lens kits. I'm sorry but $1,800 cameras and $2,400 lenses are not mass market items. But, you are right in a sense. They are "good values in that high end niche," but only if you compare them to pro grade cameras and lenses with sensors four times larger.

IBIS means every Olympus lens is image stabalized, unlike Canon and Nikon which make you pay a premium for it with every lens. The IQ of the 50 mm f/2, 14-54 mm and 50-200 mm are great values.

Sony and Pentax also make DSLRs and DSLTs that have IBIS, but you are right about those lenses.

My post to the OP above was all about the added cost of abandoning Olympus and buying into Nikon APS-C. And the upgrade path for Nikon is an expensive D600, D800 or D4, with a whole new set of fast, f/2.8 lenses. If the OP buys DX format lensesthat are designed for APS-C , comparable to the Olympus kit lenses he has now, then he'll have to replace those DX lenses when and if he wants to upgrade to full frame.

Three really is no good upgrade path for APS-C, since both Canon and Nikon don't make very many upgrade lenses for that format. They force you to move to FF for their best lenses, which means you pay a lot and have a larger and heavier lens, or you simply upgrade to a better DX camera and continue to use DX lenses.

But the good lenses do exist, if you are willing to use heavier lenses designed for a much larger camera.

Right now... the best upgrade path probably exists in M4/3, with cameras and lenses at various price points and quality levels. The OM-D with a 45mm or 75mm lens, or a GH-3 with a 12-35mm or 35-100mm lens will beat the pants off an E-5... and quite a few high grade APS-C DSLRs too.

Sorry for the rant.

 Marty4650's gear list:Marty4650's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M5 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1 Olympus E-M1 Panasonic Lumix G 14mm F2.5 ASPH Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm F1.8 +12 more
OP Chrisp63 New Member • Posts: 13
Re: Marty, this post is why people leave Olympus

dave gaines wrote:

And not just your post Marty. A lot of naysayers have been proclaiming Olympus 4/3 is a dead system. They've kept it up every since Oly did not release another DSLR immediately after releasing the E-5 (only 3 yers ago). But if you look at the chain of events that have beset Olympus, the global economy, a Tsunami and an accounting debacle that plunged their stock value, it's not hard to understand why Oly has not released any new DSLRs in addition to the Pens and OM-D they were already developing.

If the OP came around for the first time and read posts like yours he'd want to abandon Olympus.

The E-5 was a great value when it was released. It answered most of the calls from loyal Olympus 4/3 users for a greatly reduced AA filter, the newer sensor that was already in the E-30, A new media card format to replace the xD card, and better resolution for those SHG lenses. When it was released, early adopters praised it in large numbers. Now it needs an upgrade to include the latest Sony Sensor or one better than what's in the OM-D so it can compete with the likes of a D7100, etc. For what they are selling for used, it is still a great value.

But now Olympus has verified that a new DSLR is coming later this year. We just don't know if it will be an entry level model E-xxx, E-xx or a new Pro level E-7, or one of each.

Olympus is still a good value for photo enthusiasts. The great optics are affordable. Telephoto lenses are much more affordable with Olympus than FF and easier to achive long reach than with APS-C sensors like the D7100. IBIS means every Olympus lens is image stabalized, unlike Canon and Nikon which make you pay a premium for it with every lens. The IQ of the 50 mm f/2, 14-54 mm and 50-200 mm are great values.

My post to the OP above was all about the added cost of abandoning Olympus and buying into Nikon APS-C. And the upgrade path for Nikon is an expensive D600, D800 or D4, with a whole new set of fast, f/2.8 lenses. If the OP buys DX format lensesthat are designed for APS-C , comparable to the Olympus kit lenses he has now, then he'll have to replace those DX lenses when and if he wants to upgrade to full frame.

Hi,

While I do read the 'negative posts' on this foruit they are only one aspect of the decision makingprocess. When I bought my e-510 five years ago I researched all the options and chose that camera and systeAsa's being best for me based on all the evidence and I have never regretted that. Now I want to upgrade (I did think seriously about full frame but have rejected it) I am doing the same, I don't spend money on things like this without thorough research. It is noticeable that Olympus now never feature in such publications as 'What Camera' or online review sites simply because there are no competitive models at the moment, compare that to when I bought the e-510 when I had a choice of at least 4 SLR Olympus models. As I also mentioned it will be buying my new camera in June and have not stopped considering the options. I also didn't mean this post to be a hello and goodbye one, I was interested on people'scomments about the Nikon andtheir adoption of a 4/3 crop mode at 16mp and the omission of the first pass filter.

Cheers Chris

P.S I appreciate all the comments and discussion points, even the ones slagging me off, makes for a healthy interesting debate

Roger Engelken
Roger Engelken Veteran Member • Posts: 5,306
Re: Marty, this post is why people leave Olympus

Chrisp63 wrote:

While I do read the 'negative posts' on this foruit they are only one aspect of the decision making process. When I bought my e-510 five years ago I researched all the options and chose that camera and systeAsa's being best for me based on all the evidence and I have never regretted that. Now I want to upgrade (I did think seriously about full frame but have rejected it) I am doing the same, I don't spend money on things like this without thorough research. It is noticeable that Olympus now never feature in such publications as 'What Camera' or online review sites simply because there are no competitive models at the moment, compare that to when I bought the e-510 when I had a choice of at least 4 SLR Olympus models. As I also mentioned it will be buying my new camera in June and have not stopped considering the options. I also didn't mean this post to be a hello and goodbye one, I was interested on people's comments about the Nikon and their adoption of a 4/3 crop mode at 16mp and the omission of the first pass filter.

Cheers Chris

P.S I appreciate all the comments and discussion points, even the ones slagging me off, makes for a healthy interesting debate

I do appreciate, for what that is worth, that you did not just come in here as a new poster and trash the E-System and then disappear into the sunset.  We had another poster do that a week or so ago.  Hence my reaction to your post up front.

I am not quite sure why people find the need to bash a product or product line.  Olympus does not hold a monopoly on eliciting such behavior to be sure.  There are plenty of examples, including on the forums dedicated to other camera makers here on dpreview.  It gets rather old and tiring, and does nothing but a disservice to all involved.  There are many wonderful and outstanding camera bodies out there, and no doubt the D7100 will be like that to many, both those dedicated to Nikkon products and likely others as well.  That fosters competition, and meets the needs and desires of a greater cross section of amateur and professional photographers.  Those things are always good to have.

I am quite happy with my Olympus setup.  I am not ashamed to say so.  That does not make it the do all and end all for anyone else.  In that same vein, someone else replying in this or any thread that they are a realist and therefore their viewpoint is the right viewpoint is also not the do all nor end all for anyone else.  I was not swayed to buy into Olympus due to this forum, or any other for that matter (I've used Olympus gear since before this medium existed), and the opinions (which we all at times may write as statements) of others are just that, opinions.  The same goes for me :-D.

Whatever path you choose, make sure it is for the love of the world of photography, and that the equipment you choose furthers that, challenges you and is a support in your growth in the hobby and/or profession.  Best of luck.

Roger.

 Roger Engelken's gear list:Roger Engelken's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Olympus E-M1 Olympus OM-D E-M10 Olympus E-M1 II Olympus PEN E-P5 +10 more
illy
illy Forum Pro • Posts: 12,160
Re: Marty, this post is why people leave Olympus

dave gaines wrote:

And not just your post Marty. A lot of naysayers have been proclaiming Olympus 4/3 is a dead system. They've kept it up every since Oly did not release another DSLR immediately after releasing the E-5 (only 3 yers ago). But if you look at the chain of events that have beset Olympus, the global economy, a Tsunami and an accounting debacle that plunged their stock value, it's not hard to understand why Oly has not released any new DSLRs in addition to the Pens and OM-D they were already developing.

If the OP came around for the first time and read posts like yours he'd want to abandon Olympus.

The E-5 was a great value when it was released. It answered most of the calls from loyal Olympus 4/3 users for a greatly reduced AA filter, the newer sensor that was already in the E-30, A new media card format to replace the xD card, and better resolution for those SHG lenses. When it was released, early adopters praised it in large numbers. Now it needs an upgrade to include the latest Sony Sensor or one better than what's in the OM-D so it can compete with the likes of a D7100, etc. For what they are selling for used, it is still a great value.

But now Olympus has verified that a new DSLR is coming later this year. We just don't know if it will be an entry level model E-xxx, E-xx or a new Pro level E-7, or one of each.

Olympus is still a good value for photo enthusiasts. The great optics are affordable. Telephoto lenses are much more affordable with Olympus than FF and easier to achive long reach than with APS-C sensors like the D7100. IBIS means every Olympus lens is image stabalized, unlike Canon and Nikon which make you pay a premium for it with every lens. The IQ of the 50 mm f/2, 14-54 mm and 50-200 mm are great values.

My post to the OP above was all about the added cost of abandoning Olympus and buying into Nikon APS-C. And the upgrade path for Nikon is an expensive D600, D800 or D4, with a whole new set of fast, f/2.8 lenses. If the OP buys DX format lensesthat are designed for APS-C , comparable to the Olympus kit lenses he has now, then he'll have to replace those DX lenses when and if he wants to upgrade to full frame.

Unless he decides to wait(waste of time and money as tech moves so quick)he has two choices, buy a E-5.... which with the lenses he has is probably the best option, or make a complete switch to Nikon, making a post of his needs over there being a sensible thing to do. Waiting for a product that doesn't exist is never a good idea especially when no one has a single idea of what it might be.

-- hide signature --

The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.

 illy's gear list:illy's gear list
Nikon D200 Nikon D5100 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G Sigma 500mm F4.5 EX DG HSM +4 more
PenFan2011 Regular Member • Posts: 172
Re: Marty, this post is why people leave Olympus

Olympus  is getting out of the Dslr  market.  Anyone who can't see that isn't  paying attention. When it comes to bodies they were making the Microsoft Zune of Dslr  cameras.  If people aren't  buying them why would you keep making them and spending millions of dollars developing them.  Other users have been jumping ship for years as they demanded feature X, Y, or Z and when Canon or Nikon could deliver and Olympus couldn't  that was their rationalization.

Now some of those features are now in there mirror-less cameras, which are basically their bread-and-butter and they're making a very good living selling those cameras.  They offer an ability to use the old lenses, but for most professionals performance of those lenses at current development levels is insufficient in terms of focusing speed. Their forthcoming E7 or unknown milc hybrid supposed to finally take care of this.   We'll see.

That being said, I have taken some really amazing pictures with my E-PL1 And some Olympus  and adapted Leica  glass..

When it comes down to it, a camera is a tool. Right now PEN and om-d cameras cannot serve me well on a wedding, simply because on  a single charge of one battery they can't last quarter of the time my d7000 can.  I pretty much own that camera as a work camera as a result.  I use my PEN for fun and more creative work.

Cameras don't make good pictures, good glass does.

Using Canon or Nikon doesn't make anybody a better photographer.  But they do have a lot of third party lens and accessory options.

Those who left the E Systems in droves (Most of the time for canikon gimmick features) killed the system just as much as Olympus did.

The grass will always be greener on the other side when you can't get that feature the company you currently use has no interest or incentive to offer it to you .

-- hide signature --

I am far too busy taking pictures to look for problems with the cameras I use to take them.

Craig from Nevada
Craig from Nevada Veteran Member • Posts: 4,593
Re: Marty, this post is why people leave Olympus

Hardly a rant.  Mostly just facts.

When you look at the facts you see that Olympus abandoned 4/3rds years ago.

Talk of a new DSLR leads to the question of "why"?

 Craig from Nevada's gear list:Craig from Nevada's gear list
Olympus Tough TG-4 Olympus E-5 Olympus E-620 Olympus E-30 Olympus PEN E-PL6 +20 more
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads