What has happened to Nikon?

Started Feb 14, 2013 | Discussions
John M Roberts Senior Member • Posts: 2,631
Re: Disasters shouldn't negate customer respect
1

Robin Casady wrote:

John M Roberts wrote:

They could have been more transparent in their situation and copped to some of these problems. They could have shared some numbers, if in fact they are so few, to help assure their customers that they care and that buying a D800 doesn't have to be felt like a crapshoot. That they have not done this causes me hesitation. I have never in all my purchases of camera gear from various brands ever had the concerns I have now and that is over 40 years.

To me, the hardships of disaster is no excuse for lack of customer respect.

I have to wonder what planet you are from?

Same planet as yours but apparently I'm seeing it with rose colored glasses as far as expectations go. Sadly you are right and it is ridiculous to expect more from most large companies. Thanks for the wake up.

Can you think of a company that is quickly forthcoming about problems with their products? It usually only happens when government agencies force them to do recalls.

Toyota was not forthcoming about their QC problems until the US Government and the media had beaten them up severely. Apple has buried a number of QC problems that enraged customers and made for a lot of forum chatter. Remember Ford's handling of the flaming Pinto, and the roll-over SUV?

There were a number of minor problems with the 2007 MINI Cooper S that MINI/BMW tried to hide. They had internal memos on them, so they knew about the problems, but only went public with the things that the government forced them to recall.

Many states in the USA have Lemon Laws for cars because the car companies are so bad about such issues. There has to be a great deal of public sentiment on an issue for lawmakers to go against the corporate lobbyists and enact consumer protection laws.

This expectation that Nikon should be candid about non-lethal problems with their cameras is expecting them to be different from the majority of large corporations. The reasons corporations are this way is because it is what works best for them. If a corporation announced that they have problems, nobody pats them on the back for being honest. They stop buying their products.

-- hide signature --

Robin Casady
http://www.robincasady.com/Photo/index.html
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts."
— Bertrand Russell

Klindar New Member • Posts: 6
Re: What has happened to Nikon?
1

Probably a worthwhile thread (very popular, after all, which is the proof) and no, I am not a fan boy but economic reality means most of us end up sticking with what we first bought. I started doing photography in 1964 - with Nikon gear - and have never regretted it. I now have the D7000 and D800. While some people report an unfavorable experience with the D800 I cannot share in this. It is the first small format (i.e., 35 mm) camera that allows me to leave my bulky, heavy medium format film equipment at home most of the time. IMO many people bought this camera without identifying the target customer. From the specs you know it was never intended to be a rapid-fire shooter. It is a connoisseur's camera, meant for the photographer valuing the finest possible image quality - extreme sharpness, low noise and high dynamic range - and prepared to take a bit of time in pursuit of that goal. These days it seems everyone aspires to be an action sports shooter. I do not. My interests are landscape, wildlife and nature in general. In these areas the D800 has no peer. For action sports there are better choices but I realized that before I chose it. For me, 4fps is plenty. I'm not a machine-gunner

I have done the tests and have no AF issues whatsoever, even in poor light where, again, the D800 has few if any rivals. This is possibly the case because I am not an early adopter and wait for the higher serial numbers when buying anything.

Nikon lenses are fantastic and the best ones really take advantage of the D800's superior performance. I also had half a dozen full manual primes left from film days, all purchased 1973 and earlier. John White modified these to work on the D300/7000/D800 and they are amazing lenses as well. You even get auto exposure in aperture priority mode. This cost me under $200. Nikon protected my investment by sticking with the F-mount and I appreciate it.

Thom Hogan regularly discusses Nikon's business situation and it actually looks pretty good at present. Nikon mostly hit their sales targets for the year past. The DSLR business generally is under pressure from phone cameras and mirrorless. Nikon is mostly a camera company so you could expect them to be up and down in an evolving market. Canon could probably lose their entire camera business and never notice. They are out there flogging copiers, scanners, printers, paper, toner, ink, broadcast gear, projectors and, for all I know, refrigerators.

Both Nikon and Canon are saying (if not by word, then deed) that the future of DSLRs and high end photography is FX. DX and APS-C will fall under the onslaught of mirrorless and toy cameras. Nikon's strategy seems to lie in pushing down the price of FX so as to bail out the serious photographers still hanging onto DX. Nikon had a very strong year with FX offerings. Even my dentist bought a D600 and loves it - his first digital camera. I know a lot of photogs, including some pros, who have the D800 and won't be letting go of it any time soon.

All that said, I know Nikon had some QA issues with early runs of the D800. It happens. Recall Canon's problem about the same time with the handgrips on some of their DSLRs decomposing into a carcinogenic muck and the light leaks at high ISO.

FWIW,

k

 Klindar's gear list:Klindar's gear list
Nikon D800 Nikon D7000 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 16-85mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F4G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED +11 more
lock Veteran Member • Posts: 6,202
I am one step away from making it a legal affair.
5

I' ve had the extreme dust and oil and it still isn't over after after two repairs...

I still have the coating coming off after two repairs.

Nikon admits there is an oil issue but refuses to do anything else but clean as long as Japan does not come up with a fix. Nikon silences the coating coming off: it ignores it completely.

The retailer is caught by this Nikon attitude and fears to lose money on the deal. In turn, it refuses to give me my money back, but at the same time admits it cannot guarantee a new d600 would solve the issues.

Basically, t

hey want me to take the loss. And I refuse.

I will allow them to deliver another d600 under the condition that a second failure means I will get my my money back. It looks like they will not except this final option. Very likely, court will be the only way to solve this matter.

I know, this is just one case. But you asked what was happening...

lock

RedFox88 Forum Pro • Posts: 29,025
Re: What has happened to Nikon?

Shotcents wrote:

NONE of us will buy another D800.

"us"?  Just who are you speaking on behalf of?

My D800 is the best DSLR I've owned. But it's also been the worst; fussy, inconsistent and slow.

Something can't be the best and worst, really now.  Average it out and that's what your camera is, which will be in the middle not the best and worst.

FtoDin5min Regular Member • Posts: 427
Re: My biggest problem with Nikon is me...

gomoku wrote:

FtoDin5min wrote:

So, only doubting me, I tweaked my technique, learned the settings that suited me best. And it was a real learning curve. It took a couple of months. During these two months, the left AF issue came out. I bought lensalign and reikan focal, AF fine tune my bodies, became crazy and tested and retested my left sensors... looked like I didn't have the dreaded issue.

Result is:

- I had to really adjust my technique and settings preferences

- A little of AF Fine tune

and now I have tack sharp pictures on a very consistent basis.

Kudos to someone who is able to admit this. Most of us have had to step up our game to get the most out of our D800. I am confident the D800 AF issue is in reality a very mixed bag of all sorts of things. A steep learning curve is one of them.

Thanks:) I really think it is normal to admit inexperience!! It is the main reason I come here, get info, advice, etc...

it doesn't mean the bodies are problem free, it just means that people really have a lot of work to do before really being able to say whether the problems come from them or the camera. Unfortunately, most people won't admit that either to the forums or even to themselves. And again, to be honest, I would probably have blamed the camera as well if I had read all these posts before doing my homework. It really took me 2 months to get to good results...

Unfortunately these forums do not allow us to sort out the good and the bad. Again, this camera is extremely demanding at the beginning (at least it was to me) and most people do not realize that... It almost has the ability of a medium format and looks and feel like any other semi-pro dslr. If it did look and feel like a MF, most people would realize the technical curve and work on their technique first to move into this new 'world'. Because the D800 looks like any other FF/DX, users just assume it is just an improved version of their previous camera which is not the case... In a way, I felt Nikon kind of warned prospective buyers in their marketing when they launched the D800: it really isn't for everyone and every use (although I am now looooooving it for family snaps)...

Best,

-- hide signature --

FTD5

 FtoDin5min's gear list:FtoDin5min's gear list
Nikon D800 Nikon D850 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F4G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 85mm f/1.4G +6 more
Shotcents
OP Shotcents Veteran Member • Posts: 4,472
Re: What has happened to Nikon?
1

RedFox88 wrote:

Shotcents wrote:

NONE of us will buy another D800.

"us"? Just who are you speaking on behalf of?

My friends, some of which are pro shooters. I also have a friend who, with his wife, teach a photography class here in NY. The "with his wife" part might clue some as to who he is. He has huge contact with Nikon and the gear, not to mention owning all of the new models. Like me he's found a 100% failure rate; meaning that every single D800 he's held has had an AF calibration issue.

He's "done" as they say. He's cutting his losses and moving to Canon. So are a bit less than a 3rd of my friends. Is that a lot? I think it is because we were all pretty hardcore Nikon fans.

And I'm STILL a fan. My D800 is not a BAD camera, it's just not quite as good with the AF as my D700 was.

My D800 is the best DSLR I've owned. But it's also been the worst; fussy, inconsistent and slow.

Something can't be the best and worst, really now. Average it out and that's what your camera is, which will be in the middle not the best and worst.

When I get the shot with the D800 it's a wonderful camera. Most of the time I do get the shot. But the misses are more common than with any previous body. Still worse, it's very tough to trace the cause of the OOF shots as they can occur under the most simple of conditions that would have never slowed the D700 or D3 down.

And of course we all have the left AF issue to varying degrees.

Robert

 Shotcents's gear list:Shotcents's gear list
Nikon Coolpix P7700 Nikon D800 Nikon D5200 Nikon Df Nikon D5300 +11 more
larrywilson
larrywilson Veteran Member • Posts: 6,582
Re: What has happened to Nikon?

Whats happening to Nikon?  My answer is nothing!!!!  I've only read about a fourth of the comments on this thread and only a couple comments by shotcents.

I must admit that the auto focus on the new cameras are complicated due to all the optics concerning different modes in the auto focus settings.  It has taken me a few months to learn about the auto focus system on the d4 I bought last August and how to set it to perform the best way in my style of shooting.  My last camera was a d3s.

In photographing bif the d4 performs really well and I use the dynamic 21 point focusing for this type of subject.  No I have not tested the outter focus points on a target because I really don't use the points much.  The d4 after using it for a few months is an excellant upgrade from the d3s with no problems for me.

I personally don't have a problem with Nikon but realize some people do have problems.

Larry

 larrywilson's gear list:larrywilson's gear list
Nikon D500 Nikon D850 Zeiss Milvus 50mm F2 Macro Nikon AF-S Nikkor 500mm F4E FL ED VR Zeiss Milvus 18mm F2.8 +7 more
Rich Rosen Senior Member • Posts: 2,576
Re: What has happened to Nikon? Floods and earthquakes.

I know. Its been  one- two years since the earthquake struck Sendai and the floods struck Thailand. But perhaps, a lot  of the quality control issues can be traced to those disasters. I am not making excuses for Nikon. They should have straightened their messes, before resuming production at both plants. I am only suggesting that the cause of Nikon's recent production problems can be attributed to Mother Nature. Unfortunately, Nikon's poor customer service can only be attributed to man.

 Rich Rosen's gear list:Rich Rosen's gear list
Nikon D1X Nikon D500 Nikon Z6 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm F4G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28mm f/1.8G +19 more
Lance B Forum Pro • Posts: 31,681
I had constant issue with oil and spots on my D700

Prairie Pal wrote:

lanefAU wrote:

Same here, it was a big mistake on my part to jump early on a new model, should have waited at least a year as I did for my D70, D200 & D700.

I'm in the same boat. I was late in the game before I actually picked up and experienced the feel and performance of the D700 and then before I knew it they were no longer available. I regretted not getting one, so when the D600 came out I jumped on it in faith that it was going to be as trouble free and venerable as the D700 despite the plastic build. That's the last time I ever make that mistake with Nikon.

Interestingly, my D700 had a constant issue with dust and oil spots. I had to get it cleaned 4 times in the two years and 14,000 shutter actuations due to geavy contamination of oils and dust spots. I was not overly happy about it, but I just got it cleaned and got on with it.

 Lance B's gear list:Lance B's gear list
Nikon D850 Nikon Z7 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24mm f/1.4G ED Nikon AF-S Nikkor 400mm f/2.8E FL ED VR +15 more
davidfoto Junior Member • Posts: 43
Re: What has happened to Nikon?
1

Shotcents wrote:

And before the fanboys react and attack me I'm venting here! It's a valid set of observations for a group forum to DISCUSS Nikon gear. If your cameras work better than your last, GREAT. I'm seriously glad to hear about it. But, as many of us honest folk will admit, all is not well in Nikon-Land. Let's keep this civil and mature. This is MY view.

Up until the D800 my life with Nikon was just about perfect. How perfect? Well, I spent 25K or more EASILY on Nikon cameras and lenses, starting with the D70, D50, D80, and then jumping into the D300, D3, D700, multiple bodies and flashes and two kits I was always comfortable using.

Enter the D800. At first things seem okay, but over the months I was less and less secure with the AF. It was CLEARLY less reliable than the D700 in challenging situations. My friends staunchly defended the D800 (and D4), but one by one they ended up with the same feeling. About half of us sent our cameras back.

My 1st D800 suffers from a MILD left AF issue. I'm sure a lot of people wish their issue was as mild as mine because I've seen far worse. My 2nd D800 was terrible. Left and right side were WAY off. I returned it.

Through various techniques and generally using ONLY the center AF point along with using the AF-ON focus technique, I get fairly reliable results. Images are wonderful, but I don't have that warm feeling I had with the D700 or D3. Some of my friends, who shoot weddings, have abandoned the D800 completely.

NONE of us will buy another D800.

Enter the D600. I DON'T HAVE ONE. But a lot of my friends jumped. Why not? Lower cost high MP second body! It's a nice dream. But what the heck!? Oil on the sensor? Silly amounts of dust along with it. Wet cleanings every other week?

And you can go to ANY major forum and hear about folks trying to get these cameras serviced. We're NOT talking about a small group. Cameras go back 2 or 3 times. Some owners are BLAMED by Nikon and charged. What the deuce?!, as Stewie would say!

So where has this left me? I'll think LONG and hard before buying the next DXXX. I'm absolutely terrified to return my D800 for service. Nikon stock is way down, just like their online reputation. It's a great time for photography, but you have to hope for a good camera in the box as never before.

My D800 is the best DSLR I've owned. But it's also been the worst; fussy, inconsistent and slow. It feels like a work-in-progress. Naturally others will jump in and claim their D800 cameras are perfect, better than sex and whatever. But, as someone else pointed out: Somewhere between the fanboys and the disgruntled owners with bad cameras lies the truth.

Cheers,

Robert

Fully agree with all of this. Mine has Green Lcd. As I said it can be corrected, but the problem was there. After testing the AF in really good conditions - siemens start from only few meters with fully filling the center AF point the results were mixed. Randomly back and forth focusing. The most left and most right AF points were back focusing compared to the center point. As I stated the cam will go back and there is very high possibility that I will go to Canon.

ormdig
ormdig Senior Member • Posts: 2,364
Re: D800 only post, technology marches on...

"I have been shooting Nikon a long time and the D800 is the first camera available that allows me to shoot indoor basketball" Chad Gladstone.

My experience exactly. I shoot in small town gyms with horrible lighting and had resorted to using a 50 f/1.8 at 1.8 with a D7000 and was in despair because of either dark images or unnacceptable noise. The D800 coupled with a 70-200 f/2.8 has completely turned things around. I'm getting images that I  like and not just a few but almost everything I shoot is technically good. I weed out images almost soley because of composition etc. and not because of dark, noisy, missed focus criteria.

One other thing I have discovered is that the D800 allows me to use matrix metering with auto ISO and I am getting evenly exposed images across the board no matter which focus point I use. I have always used spot metering, trying to get at least the subject exposed which in poor light results in underexposed images when focussing on white uniforms and blown out backgrounds when focussed on dark uniforms. Matrix metering just plain didn't work in these situations with the D7000, D90. I can set my base ISO at 400 and limit the high at 4000 and it nails it time after time. The added plus with the D800 is ISO4000 doesn't require noise reduction at all unless I want to print 11x14 or larger. Also the colors in cyclical lighting haven't been a problem at high ISOs, another first for me.

I'm glad to hear someone else is experiencing newfound abilities with this camera.

 ormdig's gear list:ormdig's gear list
Nikon D7000 Nikon D800 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II Nikon AF-S 105mm F1.4E ED +7 more
nathantw Senior Member • Posts: 1,735
Re: Delay purchase based on forum chatter: a sad fail.

moving_comfort wrote:

nathantw wrote:

I've been dying to buy the D800 because that's the camera I've been waiting for but after seeing all the complaints I decided to wait for its successor and for Nikon to get their s**t together. It's too bad because Nikon did have a great reputation and deservedly so during their film years.

-

.

Personally I think you've shot yourself in the foot.

There's a lot of hysteria, a lot of false information, a lot of trolling, etc. If you've delayed a purchase of something as great as a D800 based on this forum, you've done yourself a disservice.

You're probably right. I keep looking at the D800 really wanting one, but so hesitant. I almost ran to the store today after reading yours and another poster's response thinking you're correct, but $3k is still a lot of money to be dropping down for what may or may not be a crap-shoot.

-- hide signature --

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nathantw/
Always have a camera with you and make sure you use it.

yray
yray Senior Member • Posts: 1,747
Re: What has happened to Nikon?
1

Klindar wrote:


Both Nikon and Canon are saying (if not by word, then deed) that the future of DSLRs and high end photography is FX. DX and APS-C will fall under the onslaught of mirrorless and toy cameras. Nikon's strategy seems to lie in pushing down the price of FX so as to bail out the serious photographers still hanging onto DX.

Much of what you're saying is well informed and hard to argue with. However, the comment about DX misses the point. Many people shooting high end DX. i.e D300/s, are doing it not because they couldn't afford FX before D600 came along, but because these cameras are uniquely suitable for many sports and wildlife environments. However, one does get an impression that Nikon might have misinterpreted the popularity of the high end DX the same way you did. It is certainly possible that we'll see a high end mirrorless one day which will fill this niche, but I don't think we're there yet. In addition, people who invested a great deal into long fast glass are not likely to be interested in mirrorless unless Nikon devises some ways to ensure full mount compatibility.

Lance B Forum Pro • Posts: 31,681
Really? Is this what it has degenerated into?
5

Shotcents wrote:

And before the fanboys react and attack me I'm venting here! It's a valid set of observations for a group forum to DISCUSS Nikon gear. If your cameras work better than your last, GREAT. I'm seriously glad to hear about it. But, as many of us honest folk will admit, all is not well in Nikon-Land. Let's keep this civil and mature. This is MY view.

Honest folks? You mean that those of us that have a perfectly functioning D800/E or D600 now have to lie about it and say that their's does have some sort of fault in order to appease those that actually do have a fault? Hmmm.

Up until the D800 my life with Nikon was just about perfect. How perfect? Well, I spent 25K or more EASILY on Nikon cameras and lenses, starting with the D70, D50, D80, and then jumping into the D300, D3, D700, multiple bodies and flashes and two kits I was always comfortable using.

Well, my D700 constantly had oils and dust issues, and I needed to get it cleaned 4 times in the 14,000 actuations due to heavy contamination. Perfect? I don't think so. However, It was such a good camera that I just accepted that that was how it was and got it cleaned and went about my business.

Enter the D800. At first things seem okay, but over the months I was less and less secure with the AF. It was CLEARLY less reliable than the D700 in challenging situations. My friends staunchly defended the D800 (and D4), but one by one they ended up with the same feeling. About half of us sent our cameras back.

My D800E far and away outperforms my D700 in the AF department and in every other department and as we are talking about "friends with D800's as well", I have a friend who also has a D800 and we both shoot birds and do general photography and he also thinks the D800 is the best he has ever used. He has had or used D2H's, D700's, D3X's, D4's, D7000 as well.

My 1st D800 suffers from a MILD left AF issue. I'm sure a lot of people wish their issue was as mild as mine because I've seen far worse. My 2nd D800 was terrible. Left and right side were WAY off. I returned it.

My fist D800 did have the left AF issue, but only with the 85mm f1.4G and only at apertures under f2.8 and then only at distances over about 4-5mts. Otherwise it was perfect. As I rarely if ever used the left AF point, I put up with it. After a few months, I decided to send it back to get corrected as I thought that Nikon had by then had a fix for it. After the fix, it only very occassionally mucked up, so little in fact that it never bothered me.

I have now since got a D800E as I wanted the slight extra resolution for my bird photography. This D800E is perfect for AF (and everything else) so much so that I haven't even needed any fine tuning of my lenses!

Through various techniques and generally using ONLY the center AF point along with using the AF-ON focus technique, I get fairly reliable results. Images are wonderful, but I don't have that warm feeling I had with the D700 or D3. Some of my friends, who shoot weddings, have abandoned the D800 completely.

NONE of us will buy another D800.

We only have your word on that.

Enter the D600. I DON'T HAVE ONE. But a lot of my friends jumped. Why not? Lower cost high MP second body! It's a nice dream. But what the heck!? Oil on the sensor? Silly amounts of dust along with it. Wet cleanings every other week?

As I stated before, my copy of the much vaunted D700 had a real issue with oil and dust spots to the point I had to get it cleaned 4 times in 2 years and 14,000 actuations. I would have needed to get it cleaned more often but I resisted hoping that each time it would have exhausted it's supply of oil for recontamination.

And you can go to ANY major forum and hear about folks trying to get these cameras serviced. We're NOT talking about a small group. Cameras go back 2 or 3 times. Some owners are BLAMED by Nikon and charged. What the deuce?!, as Stewie would say!

The one's that have had their camera's sent and refused repair for damage are how many? Can you actuially give us a list, or is this another anecdotal urban myth that there are hundreds of such cases. I have read maybe two on these fora, but that is all.

So where has this left me? I'll think LONG and hard before buying the next DXXX. I'm absolutely terrified to return my D800 for service. Nikon stock is way down, just like their online reputation. It's a great time for photography, but you have to hope for a good camera in the box as never before.

My D800 is the best DSLR I've owned. But it's also been the worst; fussy, inconsistent and slow. It feels like a work-in-progress. Naturally others will jump in and claim their D800 cameras are perfect, better than sex and whatever. But, as someone else pointed out: Somewhere between the fanboys and the disgruntled owners with bad cameras lies the truth.

Why somewhere in between? As I stated, my D800E is perfect in every sense, as is my friends D800. In that regard, my D800E is better QC wise than the much vaunted D700 which I had that had real issues with dust and oil. So, as far as I am concerned it is not: "Somewhere between the fanboys and the disgruntled owners with bad cameras lies the truth." because my camera is not "Somewhere between the fanboys and the disgruntled owners" as mine is perfect. What do you want the owners of perfectly functioning cameras to do? Lie about how good they are just to appease a few that have issues? Also, why does it make those with perfectly functioning D800's and D600's all fanboys when they say that theirs works as it is supposed to, or God forbid, that they rave about how fantastic it is compared to their previous cameras, even the much vaunted (and overly worshipped) D700? Quite a strange outlook on things.

I do agree that there are some with issues, but it is not an epidemic as you are trying to make out. As other's have pointed out, those with issues will more readily complain and they get far more space on these forums than those that ever dare to say how good their camera is are howled down and called fanboys. Quite unbeliveable, really.

What do the people do when they are happy about their D800 or D600? They would like to post photos and share their experiences, but the trouble is, the self appointed forum police, narks and naysayers get upset and say, "This is a gear forum and go post your photos elsewhere". Are we going to get people just posting saying that their D800/D600's are perfect or how great they are? No, of course not, as no one wants to know. Instead, we have a propensity of complaint threads that by default are more prevalent. So, what we have is what appears to be a propensity of these new cameras that have issues, when in actual fact it is just that there is a concentration of an oversupply of complaints in comparison to those that have perfectly functioning cameras.

 Lance B's gear list:Lance B's gear list
Nikon D850 Nikon Z7 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24mm f/1.4G ED Nikon AF-S Nikkor 400mm f/2.8E FL ED VR +15 more
elliotn Senior Member • Posts: 1,897
Re: Nikon QC

Shotcents wrote:

Will Nikon care if I move to Canon? Sure they will. Because I'm not just one person. I'm the guy who knows quite a few pro shooters in NY, CT and PA. Some have already dropped Nikon. And my behavior influences people around me. And those people's behavior effects others...

You're funny.

yray
yray Senior Member • Posts: 1,747
Re: D800 only post, technology marches on...
3

Chad Gladstone wrote:

I have been shooting Nikon a long time and the D800 is the first camera available that allows me to shoot indoor basketball. Whether I have focus issues or not, I don't know, but I do know the camera is intuative (sic) enough to capture the images without motion blur (1/400), minimally distracting noise, at f2.8, whilst locking on and tracking fast and erratic subjects in full, 36 mp images. It also gives me the freedom to pull shadows without banding and has reasonable headway to recover blown highlights with minimal effort (something I could not do with my D70, D200 or D300).

Well, D700 has been around for along time, and it is arguably more suitable for shooting action. Not to discredit you experiences, but I don't believe D800 is breaking any new ground in sports shooting. It wasn't intended to.

frank-in-toronto Senior Member • Posts: 1,034
Re: I had constant issue with oil and spots on my D700

Lance B wrote:

Prairie Pal wrote:

lanefAU wrote:

Same here, it was a big mistake on my part to jump early on a new model, should have waited at least a year as I did for my D70, D200 & D700.

I'm in the same boat. I was late in the game before I actually picked up and experienced the feel and performance of the D700 and then before I knew it they were no longer available. I regretted not getting one, so when the D600 came out I jumped on it in faith that it was going to be as trouble free and venerable as the D700 despite the plastic build. That's the last time I ever make that mistake with Nikon.

Interestingly, my D700 had a constant issue with dust and oil spots. I had to get it cleaned 4 times in the two years and 14,000 shutter actuations due to geavy contamination of oils and dust spots. I was not overly happy about it, but I just got it cleaned and got on with it.

"got on with it"

i can only imagine that means that after the cleanings you were ok.  i have cleaned my D600 4 times in 4 months. just today i wet cleaned it, did 100 at Ch and when i checked there was a new spot.  a bad one that looks like a flake (i.e.: not dust, something else). I'd like to just get on with it. really.

i'm out with amateur photog groups 5 or 6 times a month. sometimes more.  most of them are using entry level or older models and ask about my d600.  i tell them i love it except for the constant dust/mess issue.  i finish with "don't get one. you could be very sorry".

jfriend00 Forum Pro • Posts: 12,396
Re: What has happened to Nikon?
2

Klindar wrote:

Both Nikon and Canon are saying (if not by word, then deed) that the future of DSLRs and high end photography is FX. DX and APS-C will fall under the onslaught of mirrorless and toy cameras. Nikon's strategy seems to lie in pushing down the price of FX so as to bail out the serious photographers still hanging onto DX.

Uhhh, show me where Nikon has recently introduced an FX camera that at least as well as the D300 and goes at least as fast as the D300 (8fps with grip)?  Not only have they not pushed anything from FX down into the DX price territory that does what the D300 does.  In fact, they haven't even introduced an FX camera in the last four years other than the $6000 D3/D4 series that can do what the D300 does.

So Nikon is nowhere even close to providing high-end DX shooters with an FX alternative.  Your hypothesis appears to be just completely wrong if you shoot action of any kind.

-- hide signature --
sandy b
sandy b Veteran Member • Posts: 9,334
Keep hearing how great the D700 quality was
1

compared to D600 oil spots. People have short memories, in 2009-2010 this forum went through the same upheaval over D700 oil stains, just google it and look at the hits. here is a representative thread: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/35011294

there are many more. My point is not that its ok that Nikons QC allows this, but that after time the D700 is giver almost cult status, inspite of the early growing pains. Nikon fixed it back then, they will again. It is a pain they didn't learn from the D700, or the D7000, D3 or D2h (yes, them too, just google), but that in the end the d700 got the respect it deserved. Hopefully this happens with the D600.

 sandy b's gear list:sandy b's gear list
Nikon Coolpix A Nikon 1 J1 Nikon D750 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F4G ED VR +10 more
GroWeb Regular Member • Posts: 152
Re: My biggest problem with Nikon is me...

FtoDin5min wrote:

When I first got these D800s and had not heard about this left AF issue, hence having no doubt in my mind about the efficiency of the AF, I was banging my head about why I could not get a good picture out of my brand new super duper D800. It could only be me, but again, it was not like I did not have any technique behind.

Interestingly, I seem to have come through a similar process, but from a different direction and with a slightly different outcome to this point. Although I had heard about the left AF issue and some other AF concerns, I was unwilling to jump to any conclusions about my beautiful new D800E that would require me to let it out of my sight long enough for Nikon to adjust it (even if that required only a few days). Therefore, when I experienced inconsistent AF, I worked on my technique so that I could be sure I was not causing my own troubles.

So, only doubting me, I tweaked my technique, learned the settings that suited me best. And it was a real learning curve. It took a couple of months. During these two months, the left AF issue came out. I bought lensalign and reikan focal, AF fine tune my bodies, became crazy and tested and retested my left sensors... looked like I didn't have the dreaded issue.

My effort to tweak my technique slowed me down and made me more careful about all aspects of my picture taking. This has been a very enjoyable experience that has resulted in photos that are not only more consistently sharply focused, but also more consistently well composed with more interesting interactions between elements.

Result is:

- I had to really adjust my technique and settings preferences

- A little of AF Fine tune

and now I have tack sharp pictures on a very consistent basis. I do have occasional misses but really not many and can never say what the causes of them are...

The different outcome for me is that I discovered that I do, indeed, have the left AF issue, but not in an extreme form. I brought the camera to Nikon Canada (which is about a 30 minute drive from my workplace) on Monday, receiving a promise that I will hear back from them within 5 to 10 business days.

Overall, once you really learn how to use this camera, it is truly unbelievable. But there is a very steep learning curve.

There is no doubt that some left AF problem exist, and by the sound of it Nikon service really sucks (I was myself less than impressed with their response to the polarization issue).

I suspect that this problem with Nikon service is perhaps limited to Nikon USA. Photographers from Japan, Europe (France, Switzerland and UK) and Canada have posted about much better service; and my prior experience with Nikon Canada has been fully satisfactory.

 GroWeb's gear list:GroWeb's gear list
Nikon D800E Nikon D7000 Nikon D300 Nikon AF DX Fisheye-Nikkor 10.5mm f/2.8G ED Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +14 more
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads