Installing OS on SSD from HDD

Started Dec 1, 2012 | Discussions
jamesdak Veteran Member • Posts: 4,827
Re: Convert your SSD to a GPT disk first to use that utility

Jim Cockfield wrote:

I don't think you're understanding me.

There is a separate setting for enable Legacy ROM, even with EEFI set.

One thing that bugs me is that you said Secure Boot was already disabled on your machine.

That doesn't sound right, since Microsoft requires that PCs that are certified for Win 8 have Secure Boot enabled by Default. Are you sure you're looking at the correct settings in your BIOS for it.

Look at page 370 of this "Wikies Beta2 .pdf file and make sure your settings match up to the changes suggested by it's author before you create your recovery media.

https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=568353f266eabd9c&id=568353F266EABD9C!19607#cid=568353F266EABD9C

Secure Boot: Disabled

Legacy Option ROM: Enabled

Boot List Option: UEFI

Your BIOS may be slightly different. But, you should find similar options.

As for the free utility to move partitions complaining about not working with GPT, it looks like there's a conflict in their description of it. It can work with GPT disks, but it can't convert one from MBR to GPT (although their Pro version can, the free version can't). See the feature comparison here:

http://www.extend-partition.com/compare-edition.html

If you look at the free version's "Key Features" Tab, you'll also see that it supports GPT. The free version just can't convert a disk from MBR to GPT.

So, since you've already created a partition on your SSD (which would have used a standard MBR and partition table versus GPT by default), you'll probably need to go into Microsoft Disk Management, delete it, and convert the disk into a GPT disk to copy your hard drive install to it using the free version of that software. See the instructions on this page to do that:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc725671.aspx

So, you may want to see if that works first before messing around with the Recovery Media (convert the SSD to a GPT disk, then see if the free version of this software works using it's Wizard to move the OS to an SSD).

http://www.extend-partition.com/free-partition-manager.html

Just for info:  Once the software converted the SSD to GPT it still said it doesn't support this function.  So no matter what it says, fact is it does not work with the free version,

And the Dell recovery program still does not want to recognize the USB even with it fomatted and everything else.

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jamesdak Veteran Member • Posts: 4,827
Re: Not alway the simple process made out to be

And I did shrink down the OS system partition on the original HD.  Made it 44 GB in size.  Yet when I wasted yet 3 more DVDS to make the recovery set with the Dell program it still does not work.  Once again once I boot up off the DVD's and start the recovery the program wants a I TB + SSD to reinstall to.  So there is something definetly wrong with how this is working on this machine.  Very frustrating but just want other's to realize that it is not necessarily the simple easy process everyone makes it out to be.  Wish I could give the reason why.

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jamesdak Veteran Member • Posts: 4,827
Re: Or, try it with an unpartitioned SSD...

Jim Cockfield wrote:

Or, just use MS Disk management to remove anything on the SSD, and try both methods with an unpartitioned SSD (remove anything on it first) and see if that works.

That's the way the Dell Datasafe Recovery program normally works (you don't need to have anything on the SSD, and it creates what's needed during the restore process).

So, because it's already got an MBR and NTFS partition on it, that could be causing your issues with both types of programs (using the Dell DataSafe Recovery media, or trying to move the OS partitions to it using third party Wizards).

But, I would make sure your BIOS is setup properly first before creating recovery disks. See page 370 in the wiki I linked to.

Then, see if Dell Datasafe will restore to an unpartitoned SSD. or if the Move OS to SSD Wizard in that free partition manager will copy the install for you. If not, try making it a GPT disk and see if it works then.

Jim Cockfield wrote:

I don't think you're understanding me.

There is a separate setting for enable Legacy ROM, even with EEFI set.

One thing that bugs me is that you said Secure Boot was already disabled on your machine.

That doesn't sound right, since Microsoft requires that PCs that are certified for Win 8 have Secure Boot enabled by Default. Are you sure you're looking at the correct settings in your BIOS for it.

Look at page 370 of this "Wikies Beta2 .pdf file and make sure your settings match up to the changes suggested by it's author before you create your recovery media.

https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=568353f266eabd9c&id=568353F266EABD9C!19607#cid=568353F266EABD9C

Secure Boot: Disabled

Legacy Option ROM: Enabled

Boot List Option: UEFI

Your BIOS may be slightly different. But, you should find similar options.

As for the free utility to move partitions complaining about not working with GPT, it looks like there's a conflict in their description of it. It can work with GPT disks, but it can't convert one from MBR to GPT (although their Pro version can, the free version can't). See the feature comparison here:

http://www.extend-partition.com/compare-edition.html

If you look at the free version's "Key Features" Tab, you'll also see that it supports GPT. The free version just can't convert a disk from MBR to GPT.

So, since you've already created a partition on your SSD (which would have used a standard MBR and partition table versus GPT by default), you'll probably need to go into Microsoft Disk Management, delete it, and convert the disk into a GPT disk to copy your hard drive install to it using the free version of that software. See the instructions on this page to do that:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc725671.aspx

So, you may want to see if that works first before messing around with the Recovery Media (convert the SSD to a GPT disk, then see if the free version of this software works using it's Wizard to move the OS to an SSD).

http://www.extend-partition.com/free-partition-manager.html

OK and the BIOS is different than what is said here and on page 370 of the Wiki.  Here are my settings for Boot:

USB Boot Support :enabled

System Mode state: user

Secure Boot state: disabled

Secure Boot: disabled

Load Legacy Oprom: enabled  Only option available

Boot mode: UEFI

and then just the boot sequence.

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jamesdak Veteran Member • Posts: 4,827
Re: WARNING: AOMEI Partition Assistant - Migrate OS to SSD Wizard

Warning on this software:

This is a Windows 8 machine,

I used it to resize the OS partition of the HD to make it a size smaller than the SSD.  The original partition was over 1 TB yet only 44 GB was being used.  I used the software to resize it to 75GB which should have been well under the size of my SSD.

Once I applied the changes in the software it shut down and then ran the rezing process.  Then my dell WOULD NOt boot up.  It was just in a continous loop trying to reboot.  So all this did was leave me with a $1000 boat anchor.  Right now I am trying to restore off the recovery disks I made earlier but the first time around I got an error code.  I am about to be really mad if all I've done is broken the new computer trying to do this very "simple" process.

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Jim Cockfield Forum Pro • Posts: 16,342
Re: WARNING: AOMEI Partition Assistant - Migrate OS to SSD Wizard

jamesdak wrote:

Warning on this software:

This is a Windows 8 machine,

I used it to resize the OS partition of the HD to make it a size smaller than the SSD. The original partition was over 1 TB yet only 44 GB was being used. I used the software to resize it to 75GB which should have been well under the size of my SSD.

Always use Windows Disk Management for resizing Windows related partitions on an existing install.

Some of those third party partition managers are supposed to be smart enough to resize the partitions created on the destination drive during a copy to a new drive.

But, personally, I'd never trust them for resizing partitions on the source drive with an Existing Windows install, as I've seen problems using that approach before.

Heck, I just finished commenting about that in a thread earlier, discussing resizing partitions in Win 7 and earlier operating systems to make room for Linux partitions:

See my posts in this thread, where I disagreed with someone about that issue, suggesting using Windows Disk Management for that purpose instead:

http://forum.mepiscommunity.org/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=34110

In any event, it's always a good idea to make a full disk image backup before modifying the partitions on an existing install. I do that all the time. But, to be safer, make sure you have a good full disk image backup first. In fact, the very first thing I do with a new machine is to make a full sector by sector copy of it using ddrescue (a linux utility).

I then use Clonezilla Live for subsequent disk image backups (because it compresses them to save space). More about Clonezilla in this post:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/39974007

But, for the very first backup, I make sure I've got an *exact* copy of the source drive.  Clonezilla live would probably be fine now, too (as the latest versions support GPT with Win 8)

In any event, did you try booting into your recovery partition to see if it could reinstall Windows for you? I'd probably try that first before using your recovery disks.

On bootup, try pressing F8 and see if booting into the Factory Restore partition is available. If not, reboot, use F2 to get into Safe Mode and see if you see it there.

Now, I have read that once partitions have been resized, using the Recovery Partition will no longer work. You'd have to test it to find out. That's one reason I usually make a full disk image backup when I get a new PC, so I make sure I've got a sector by sector copy of the disk I can use if needed.

As for using your recovery disks if it comes to that. you may need to wipe the drive first if they won't work (and I'd makes sure the BIOS settings are the same as they were when you made the recovery disks)

You can use DBAN (Darik's Boot and Nuke) for that purpose. Note this thread discussing it's use to wipe a drive in preparation for a clean install of Windows 8:

http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/software-os/w/microsoft_os/4160.1-5-upgrading-to-windows-8-on-dell-systems-via-a-clean-install.aspx

But I'd see if you can use the recovery disks without going to that approach first.

If all else fails, just reinstall Windows from scratch using a Win 8 install .iso (and that thread goes into how to get one and burn it to DVD).

You'll also find download links to torrents that have Win 8 DVDs. Or, as I already suggested in this this post, request a Win 8 disk from Dell (you'll see a link to a request form in the post I made earlier here):

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50501481

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JimC
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jamesdak Veteran Member • Posts: 4,827
Re: WARNING: AOMEI Partition Assistant - Migrate OS to SSD Wizard

Dell is sending me the OS and drivers on disk.  I am not doing anything until I get those.  Hitting f8 or f2 get me nowhere but into the BIOS on this computer.  A google search says shift F8 will get you into safe mode but that does not work either.

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Jim Cockfield Forum Pro • Posts: 16,342
Re: WARNING: AOMEI Partition Assistant - Migrate OS to SSD Wizard

jamesdak wrote:

Dell is sending me the OS and drivers on disk. I am not doing anything until I get those. Hitting f8 or f2 get me nowhere but into the BIOS on this computer. A google search says shift F8 will get you into safe mode but that does not work either.

You'll probably need to wipe the drive either way (using your existing recovery media, or using an install disk from Dell) if the partition structure is messed up on it (which it sounds like it is).

You can use DBAN for that purpose.

See my previous post for a link to a thread discussing a clean install of Win 8 that includes a section about using DBAN to make sure you start out with a clean drive for the installation.

Basically, that utility wipes the entire drive (including the first sector, partition table, etc.) so you start out with a drive just like a brand new drive comes from the drive manufacturer (with no partition table on it)

You just download it and burn the .iso to disk and boot into it and it will detect any drives in the system and give you different wipe options. I'd just use the "Quick Erase" choice, as that will zero fill the entire drive for you.

Then, see if you can use your recovery disks to reinstall Windows (or use the Windows 8 disk that Dell sends you for that purpose if your recovery disks don't work). But, you'll probably need to start out with a clean drive either way.

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JimC
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skyglider Veteran Member • Posts: 4,774
Re: Not alway the simple process made out to be

jamesdak wrote:

And I did shrink down the OS system partition on the original HD. Made it 44 GB in size. Yet when I wasted yet 3 more DVDS to make the recovery set with the Dell program it still does not work. Once again once I boot up off the DVD's and start the recovery the program wants a I TB + SSD to reinstall to. So there is something definetly wrong with how this is working on this machine. Very frustrating but just want other's to realize that it is not necessarily the simple easy process everyone makes it out to be. Wish I could give the reason why.

Have all of your efforts been trying to restore a "clone" of your OS? If so, maybe try a normal backup and restore.

I've used Acronis True Image to do a normal "backup" of the Windows OS and restored it to smaller hard drive with no problems. Acronis will even restore multiple partitions to a smaller drive and decrease the size of the partitions proportionally, as long as there is enough space on the destination drive.

I just helped a friend last week use Acronis True Image to restore a full "normal" backup of his WinXP 200GB HDD to a used 160GB HDD that I gave him. Acronis resized his two partitions down to fit the smaller HDD. Also, there was no need to prepare the used HDD because Acronis automatically deleted all partitions on the destination drive first before proceeding with the restore.

I think most backup programs can restore backups of a larger HDD to a smaller HDD. An SSD is just a SATA drive so should at least allow the restore. Some backup programs will restore with proper partition alignment for the SSD.

Sky

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