M4/3 or APS-C

Started Nov 13, 2012 | Discussions
HMY New Member • Posts: 13
M4/3 or APS-C

I am using PM1, am having difficulty with low lights photography, taking people and scene.

Will APS-C be able to give better and easier low lights photography.

Am thinking of Nex or SLT series.

Appreciate advice.

Thanks.

tkbslc Forum Pro • Posts: 12,514
Re: M4/3 or APS-C

What problems are you having?  Focus, noise?

What lens are you using?

OP HMY New Member • Posts: 13
Re: M4/3 or APS-C

The original kit lens M.Zuiko 14-45mm II f3.5-.5.5.

The problem I have with low lights is not able to get brigth shots of the people, scenes are ok.

ericN2
ericN2 Forum Pro • Posts: 17,101
Re: M4/3 or APS-C

HMY wrote:

The original kit lens M.Zuiko 14-45mm II f3.5-.5.5.

The problem I have with low lights is not able to get brigth shots of the people, scenes are ok.

Therein lies a lot of your trouble I suspect.  I have one of those earlier Pannie 14-45 lenses and they are indeed a very good lens..a LOT LOT better than what I regard myself as a bit of a cheapo 14-42 lens that they later put on as the kit-lens...
BUT..the problem is that with f3.5 at best..you're never going to have ANYTHING in hand for low light shots..   Try  finding a good, used Pancake lens..   I've had the 14mm lens on my M4/3 (recent upgrade to the GX1) and although you may say.. f2.7 isn't much better...it IS.. at least on a good camera.. and the GX1 certainly is that.. I can get low-light shots with no bother. NOT of course action type..that's quite another matter..  but if you want to do low-light a lot..then all I can say is...get a better lens.

tkbslc Forum Pro • Posts: 12,514
Re: M4/3 or APS-C

Do you have an example photo?

My guess based of the limited information you have given would be that your kit lens has an aperture that is not large enough for the light you are trying to shoot in.  You'll need to add a flash or a lens with a faster aperture, regardless of camera or sensor.

john farrar
john farrar Veteran Member • Posts: 5,038
Re: M4/3 or APS-C
1

It's more likely a dynamic range issue. Take a look at the info on the sensors in the database in the website linked to below. 16mp APS-C will be 'better' than the latest 24mp but maybe only half a stop. I think you'd need to go back up to 35mm full frame to see anything really significant.

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Cameras/Camera-Sensor-Database

dwa1 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,148
Agree with J. Farrar plus... sensor with Hi ISO / LN, fast glass and good NR sftwr.

john farrar wrote:

It's more likely a dynamic range issue. Take a look at the info on the sensors in the database in the website linked to below. 16mp APS-C will be 'better' than the latest 24mp but maybe only half a stop. I think you'd need to go back up to 35mm full frame to see anything really significant.

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Cameras/Camera-Sensor-Database

Hi ISO Performance - I agree with John regarding the DR. In addition, it's important to have a sensor / camera system that has excellent (by today's standards) Hi ISO / low noise capability.

Fast glass - This not only provides for subject isolation, but it sometimes allows you to shoot in lower light situations (compared to "non-fast glass"). By "fast glass" I'm referring to f2.8 or faster.

Noise Reduction Software - Another factor is that there is some excellent NR software that allows you to shoot with higher-than-normal ISO values. I use Topaz DeNoise which is a plug-in for CS5, 6. This allows me to "comfortably" shoot with my Nikon D300 APS-C sensor up to ISO 1600. If I didn't have this great NR software, I'd most likely limit the ISO to 800 or less.

Hope this helps you and others 'listening".

Wayne

 dwa1's gear list:dwa1's gear list
Nikon D300 Nikon D7100 Nikon D7200 Sigma 150mm F2.8 EX DG Macro HSM Nikon AF-P 70-300mm F4.5-6.3G VR
Deleted1929 Forum Pro • Posts: 13,050
How to take shots of people in low light

Use flash.

There's no magic going to happen with APS-C.  You can get a stop or so extra from the sensor, but fundamentally the correct solution is usually flash ( for any camera ).

If you can use flash try a fast lens ( a lens with a wide maximum aperture = low f-number ).  The downside of this is a small depth of field, making depth of field, particularly for groups, a major issue.

Using flash eases the problems with narrow depth of field, and using bounced (or diffuse) flash removes the issue of harsh flash effects.

I'd again emphasize that this holds regards of whether you choose m4/3 or APS-C.  Now with the latest generation of full frame sensors ( which cost a lot more than a flash ! ) you can push a fast lens a bit harder, but it's still not a great solution and depth of field will always be a challenge with a fast lens.

Also note that focus is problematic in low light.  Flash and/or a flash assist lamp can help a lot with that.

-- hide signature --

StephenG

Donkey914 Forum Member • Posts: 59
Re: M4/3 or APS-C

Try getting a faster lens before considering a potentially costly switch to a different format. If you're sticking to kit lenses, you aren't going to benefit a whole lot from a switch (and you'll lose portability).

Depending on what you're shooting 14/2.5, 20/1.7. 45/1.8 are all solid choices that won't break the bank and get you better low-light capabilities.

Flash can be a superior solution for all the reasons given by the previous posters, but from your description, there are going to be times where you won't be able to flash.

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