Why no focus issues with D5100 or D3100 compared with D7000

Started Oct 28, 2012 | Discussions
RPulley Senior Member • Posts: 1,175
Re: I have no idea either...
1

Barry Fitzgerald wrote:

Reilly Diefenbach wrote:

Good old Barry, back in the house after an all too brief abscence. Sprinkling toxicity through multiple forums. Very strange.

Oh come Reilly Ray being the die hard Pentax forum hound who attacks anyone who dare suggest issues.

More outright lies from Barry.

Here is your original "contribution" to that thread:

"That's interesting because some said the K-5 never had a FF tungsten focus issue"

Trolling if I ever saw it, especially when one considers that you never owned a K5 and have never offered a bit of proof that you have ever shot even one image with one. You often claim that "you had a play with one", or some other pure BS, but until you post images, it never happened.

Unlike you, Barry, I actually own 2 K5s, and posted extensively on the intial FF in tunsgten light problem that was resolved by a firmware update. Also unlike you, I performed well controlled tests on my cameras and lenses, the results of which I posted over one year ago, and also in the thread you were trolling in.

I have no problem hounding trolls and people who post lies and mis-information like you do Barry, so if you cannot stand the heat, I suggest staying out of the kitchen.

Ray

RPulley Senior Member • Posts: 1,175
Now Barry's Camera Has Caught a Mirror Vibration Virus....
3

Barry Fitzgerald wrote:

I also noted some mirror vibrations at some shutter speeds causing some blur..which I did not on the D90 separate issues but it did show up for me.

Wow, after pointing out to Barry that the mirror blur he "discovered" with his Pentax Kx (after reading reports about it on the forums) wasn't a Pentax-only problem:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50066092

It seems that his D7000 has caught a mirror blur virus.

Of course, this is nothing new for Barry. here is an excerpt from his glowing review of the Pentax Kr a month or so after he purchased it:

"First off I might not have even looked at the K-r due to a huge number of reports of AF issues esp FF/BF. I can report that I see no obvious problems in this regard even shooting in horribly low light and very low Kelvin light temperatures even with no AF assist light. I'm puzzled by the response on the forum suggesting there is something wrong AF wise with this model..on the contrary I find the AF excellent so far in good and poor lighting."

Barry then went on to "discover" that his Kr had an AF issue in the exact conditions he describes as having no obvious problems above, and he has been trolling and bashing the brand for an entire year ever since.

He made his trolling intentions clear in later posts like these:

"If Pentax think they can ride roughshod over customers and leave them in the dark with a faulty body and continue to sell it to unsuspecting customers..well they've sold one body too many."

"The day that body hit my lap it became my problem..now I'm going to push that problem is a very visible and public way."

"The Panzers are being fuelled right now and I'll be unleashing them very shortly!"

Barry popped up at Pentax Forums.com, Photo.net and anywhere else he could get away with his public slander campaign, and more recently took his new campaign against the D7000 to the FX forums, with reactions like this:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50131656

I quote:

I feel for you guys having to put up with his constant trolling and bashing, but what I cannot fathom is why DPReview allows this to continue?

Ray

IrishhAndy
IrishhAndy Contributing Member • Posts: 868
Re: Why no focus issues with D5100 or D3100 compared with D7000

hea wrote:

After reading all comments in B&H and Amazon about these 3 cameras I found almost no issues complaining Back/Bad focus on D3100 and D5100, but lots on D7000.

Also I read on this forum that problem with D7000 is not a problem but a user lack of technique due to size of sensor, I doubt because D5100 has same sensor, but on that camera people appear not to have issues.

If problem is because it is a semi-professional camera with lots of adjustments, again, I do not recall issues with D300 o D700 owners.

All this comment is because I want to buy D7000 but very afraid, because I buy in Texas but I live in Mexico and it is not easy to send to repair, adjust or return the camera.

Thanks

I have focus issues with the D5100.  Your statement has been falsified.

-- hide signature --

Without the darkness the light would be nothing !

dirtdiver82 New Member • Posts: 24
Re: A solution

Mako2011 wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:


I'm also aware that my Panasonic FT2 has a crappy 1/2,3" 14MP sensor that has a much greater density than the D7K and has much worse colors, DR, etc, BUT you can take a picture with one hand on a sunny day and despite the noise, the poor colors, etc it's tack sharp.

The Panasonic FT2 is a CDAF only camera. To compare realistically you need to shoot the D7K in Live view only (comparing focus).

BTW, to confirm a focus issue with the D7K, a proper CDAF vs PDAF comparison will show it or rule it out.

I wasn't comparing focus accuracy, that's another story... This isn't about D7K AF, it's about how the system handles the vibrations caused by the mirror and the shutter itself.
I wanted to point out that while some people justify the D7K small amount of motion blur in handheld shoots at certain shutter speeds due to wrong shooting techinque acquired with lower pixel density Nikon DSLRs, my FT2 has in fact a much higher pixel density and never experienced this problems.

Of course compacts are different species, but you can't justify this behaviour just because of a bit higher pixel density. Vibrations affect to every DSLR, only that in the D7K to a higher extent.

Seems there're more people concerned with this problem:

"To my eyes the D7000 exhibits mirror slap blur in those photos starting at 1/4, reaches its worst at 1/30, then has tapered off to barely noticeable at 1/125. I don't know if I'd classified it as "bad" because I don't know what the standard should be relative to other DSLRs but compared to the D5100 the D7000's blur seems rather pronounced (I don't see blur on the D5100 photos at any of the tested shutter speeds)."
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3031067

I"s this really mirror vibration or is it shutter induced vibration? I found that shooting at high frame rates with my D7000 actually reduced apparent vibration induced softness compared to slow shutter speeds, which is counter-intuitive to the mirror slap theory as the cause. After experimenting with my D7000 at various shutter speeds and using mirror lock up on a tripod, I came to the conclusion that the shutterslap vibration was more of the softness culprit at slow shutter speeds than mirror slap. I also found that anything that added mass (like the vertical grip with battery), to the camera reduced vibration induced softness at slower shutter speeds. A high quality tripod and head really makes a difference as well."
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/41245214

 dirtdiver82's gear list:dirtdiver82's gear list
Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED
phiri Contributing Member • Posts: 969
Re: A solution

dirtdiver82 wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:


I'm also aware that my Panasonic FT2 has a crappy 1/2,3" 14MP sensor that has a much greater density than the D7K and has much worse colors, DR, etc, BUT you can take a picture with one hand on a sunny day and despite the noise, the poor colors, etc it's tack sharp.

The Panasonic FT2 is a CDAF only camera. To compare realistically you need to shoot the D7K in Live view only (comparing focus).

BTW, to confirm a focus issue with the D7K, a proper CDAF vs PDAF comparison will show it or rule it out.

I wasn't comparing focus accuracy, that's another story... This isn't about D7K AF, it's about how the system handles the vibrations caused by the mirror and the shutter itself.
I wanted to point out that while some people justify the D7K small amount of motion blur in handheld shoots at certain shutter speeds due to wrong shooting techinque acquired with lower pixel density Nikon DSLRs, my FT2 has in fact a much higher pixel density and never experienced this problems.

Of course compacts are different species, but you can't justify this behaviour just because of a bit higher pixel density. Vibrations affect to every DSLR, only that in the D7K to a higher extent.

Seems there're more people concerned with this problem:

"To my eyes the D7000 exhibits mirror slap blur in those photos starting at 1/4, reaches its worst at 1/30, then has tapered off to barely noticeable at 1/125. I don't know if I'd classified it as "bad" because I don't know what the standard should be relative to other DSLRs but compared to the D5100 the D7000's blur seems rather pronounced (I don't see blur on the D5100 photos at any of the tested shutter speeds)."
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3031067

I"s this really mirror vibration or is it shutter induced vibration? I found that shooting at high frame rates with my D7000 actually reduced apparent vibration induced softness compared to slow shutter speeds, which is counter-intuitive to the mirror slap theory as the cause. After experimenting with my D7000 at various shutter speeds and using mirror lock up on a tripod, I came to the conclusion that the shutterslap vibration was more of the softness culprit at slow shutter speeds than mirror slap. I also found that anything that added mass (like the vertical grip with battery), to the camera reduced vibration induced softness at slower shutter speeds. A high quality tripod and head really makes a difference as well."
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/41245214

But also another way to look at it is to review your handholding techniques. When somebody was giving tips on handholding techniques, I thought he was carzy but then I realized with different handholding techniques particularly at certain shuter speeds, it makes a difference between a blurry and a sharp photo.

You will realize also that when many people complain about blurry pictures on the D7000, the lenses mostly used are fast primes. Why? they dont have VR. Many people use VR as default on the zoom lenses.When I use zooms, VR is only used when the shutter speeds are low. So when they switch to primes, it requires a different technique to achieve better results.

Now that I am siwtching to primes only, I remember the first time I went shooting with the 35mm only and the pictures were not that better per say. I realized another important factor is the ergonomics of the camera/lens combo. If for instance one is used to shooting a D7000 with 16-85VR and then you switch to 35mm f1.8 or 50mm f1.8, you have to adjust your handling of the camera lens combo. With each lens you use, you have to adjust your handholding techniques and adjust camera parameters such as shutter speeds accordingly. Otherwise there is no point to keep on complaining.

This is my rationale. When people using the same equipment as I have are getting better results, there are only three likely scenarios. The technique is subpar, the camera is faulty or a combination of both. But to address the issue you have to tackle the first two one by one. The first should be normally to assess your technique but usually people blame the camera first. That is why people can afford to exchange 7 camera bodies in a row.

 phiri's gear list:phiri's gear list
Nikon D7000 Nikon D600 Nikon 1 J1 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28mm f/1.8G +6 more
Barry Fitzgerald Forum Pro • Posts: 29,888
Re: A solution
2

phiri wrote:

You will realize also that when many people complain about blurry pictures on the D7000, the lenses mostly used are fast primes. Why? they dont have VR. Many people use VR as default on the zoom lenses.When I use zooms, VR is only used when the shutter speeds are low. So when they switch to primes, it requires a different technique to achieve better results.

Now that I am siwtching to primes only, I remember the first time I went shooting with the 35mm only and the pictures were not that better per say. I realized another important factor is the ergonomics of the camera/lens combo. If for instance one is used to shooting a D7000 with 16-85VR and then you switch to 35mm f1.8 or 50mm f1.8, you have to adjust your handling of the camera lens combo. With each lens you use, you have to adjust your handholding techniques and adjust camera parameters such as shutter speeds accordingly. Otherwise there is no point to keep on complaining.

This is my rationale. When people using the same equipment as I have are getting better results, there are only three likely scenarios. The technique is subpar, the camera is faulty or a combination of both. But to address the issue you have to tackle the first two one by one. The first should be normally to assess your technique but usually people blame the camera first. That is why people can afford to exchange 7 camera bodies in a row.

I noted some minor mirror induced vibrations hand holding at shorter focal lengths say 35-45mm with "safe" shutter speeds of around 1/125s and a bit over.

It was not massive quite minor but enough to take the edge off the shots, it's not something that I'd run screaming around about either..it's not as if all the shots or even half had problems

AF wise I stand by my remarks that the AF is inconsistent. It's not rocket science we all know that there is a range where the AF can lock on..and there will be some minor variations in that whatever camera you have. But the variation was quite big on the D7000's you could take 5 shots one will be on target, one a bit off, one a bit more off, and one quite some way off target. I can't explain it bar maybe the backfocus issues out of the box which can lead to that inconsistency, but it's got very little to do with technique or settings..a lot more to do with what goes on at the factory.

It's just not good enough and Nikon service isn't much use either..you might get it fixed, might have to send it in a few times to get there.

Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 25,678
faster than

dirtdiver82 wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:


I'm also aware that my Panasonic FT2 has a crappy 1/2,3" 14MP sensor that has a much greater density than the D7K and has much worse colors, DR, etc, BUT you can take a picture with one hand on a sunny day and despite the noise, the poor colors, etc it's tack sharp.

The Panasonic FT2 is a CDAF only camera. To compare realistically you need to shoot the D7K in Live view only (comparing focus).

BTW, to confirm a focus issue with the D7K, a proper CDAF vs PDAF comparison will show it or rule it out.

I wasn't comparing focus accuracy, that's another story... This isn't about D7K AF, it's about how the system handles the vibrations caused by the mirror and the shutter itself.
I wanted to point out that while some people justify the D7K small amount of motion blur in handheld shoots at certain shutter speeds due to wrong shooting techinque acquired with lower pixel density Nikon DSLRs, my FT2 has in fact a much higher pixel density and never experienced this problems.

Of course compacts are different species, but you can't justify this behaviour just because of a bit higher pixel density. Vibrations affect to every DSLR, only that in the D7K to a higher extent.

Seems there're more people concerned with this problem:

"To my eyes the D7000 exhibits mirror slap blur in those photos starting at 1/4, reaches its worst at 1/30, then has tapered off to barely noticeable at 1/125. I don't know if I'd classified it as "bad" because I don't know what the standard should be relative to other DSLRs but compared to the D5100 the D7000's blur seems rather pronounced (I don't see blur on the D5100 photos at any of the tested shutter speeds)."
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3031067

All true and easily mitigated, but you were speaking of shots faster than 1/250s.  That's not mirror slap.

I"s this really mirror vibration or is it shutter induced vibration? I found that shooting at high frame rates with my D7000 actually reduced apparent vibration induced softness compared to slow shutter speeds, which is counter-intuitive to the mirror slap theory as the cause. After experimenting with my D7000 at various shutter speeds and using mirror lock up on a tripod, I came to the conclusion that the shutterslap vibration was more of the softness culprit at slow shutter speeds than mirror slap. I also found that anything that added mass (like the vertical grip with battery), to the camera reduced vibration induced softness at slower shutter speeds. A high quality tripod and head really makes a difference as well."
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/41245214

You can use live view to see, it's not a shutter vibration issue

dirtdiver82 New Member • Posts: 24
Re: faster than

Mako2011 wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:


I'm also aware that my Panasonic FT2 has a crappy 1/2,3" 14MP sensor that has a much greater density than the D7K and has much worse colors, DR, etc, BUT you can take a picture with one hand on a sunny day and despite the noise, the poor colors, etc it's tack sharp.

The Panasonic FT2 is a CDAF only camera. To compare realistically you need to shoot the D7K in Live view only (comparing focus).

BTW, to confirm a focus issue with the D7K, a proper CDAF vs PDAF comparison will show it or rule it out.

I wasn't comparing focus accuracy, that's another story... This isn't about D7K AF, it's about how the system handles the vibrations caused by the mirror and the shutter itself.
I wanted to point out that while some people justify the D7K small amount of motion blur in handheld shoots at certain shutter speeds due to wrong shooting techinque acquired with lower pixel density Nikon DSLRs, my FT2 has in fact a much higher pixel density and never experienced this problems.

Of course compacts are different species, but you can't justify this behaviour just because of a bit higher pixel density. Vibrations affect to every DSLR, only that in the D7K to a higher extent.

Seems there're more people concerned with this problem:

"To my eyes the D7000 exhibits mirror slap blur in those photos starting at 1/4, reaches its worst at 1/30, then has tapered off to barely noticeable at 1/125. I don't know if I'd classified it as "bad" because I don't know what the standard should be relative to other DSLRs but compared to the D5100 the D7000's blur seems rather pronounced (I don't see blur on the D5100 photos at any of the tested shutter speeds)."
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3031067

All true and easily mitigated, but you were speaking of shots faster than 1/250s. That's not mirror slap.

I"s this really mirror vibration or is it shutter induced vibration? I found that shooting at high frame rates with my D7000 actually reduced apparent vibration induced softness compared to slow shutter speeds, which is counter-intuitive to the mirror slap theory as the cause. After experimenting with my D7000 at various shutter speeds and using mirror lock up on a tripod, I came to the conclusion that the shutterslap vibration was more of the softness culprit at slow shutter speeds than mirror slap. I also found that anything that added mass (like the vertical grip with battery), to the camera reduced vibration induced softness at slower shutter speeds. A high quality tripod and head really makes a difference as well."
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/41245214

You can use live view to see, it's not a shutter vibration issue

Yes, in my experience I suffered some motion blur shooting at 1/500s while shooting my D7K as steady as I could and holding my breath with the 70-300VR at higher focal lengths.

Same lens on a D90 delivered better results. Pixel density is not that much higher on the D7K, and I'm 30 years old, do sport often and I'm healthy enough to stabilize a D7K with a 70-300VR.
My pulse is fine. I can get sharp images at 1/20s using my Samsung Galaxy S3 which is very light, with an onscreen shutter button, and quite dificult to held steady because of its shape but let´s say I can't held steady a system WAY more ergonomic. Yep sure.

The inconsistent low-light AF performance must be user fault too. And it's tendency to overexpose in certain situations...
Don't get me wrong, I liked my D7K, but got stolen so I want to invest my money on a system that has most of the "limitations" of the D7K fixed. Name it D400 (thats what I hope).

 dirtdiver82's gear list:dirtdiver82's gear list
Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED
Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 25,678
Not shutter/Mirror Vibration

dirtdiver82 wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:


I'm also aware that my Panasonic FT2 has a crappy 1/2,3" 14MP sensor that has a much greater density than the D7K and has much worse colors, DR, etc, BUT you can take a picture with one hand on a sunny day and despite the noise, the poor colors, etc it's tack sharp.

The Panasonic FT2 is a CDAF only camera. To compare realistically you need to shoot the D7K in Live view only (comparing focus).

BTW, to confirm a focus issue with the D7K, a proper CDAF vs PDAF comparison will show it or rule it out.

I wasn't comparing focus accuracy, that's another story... This isn't about D7K AF, it's about how the system handles the vibrations caused by the mirror and the shutter itself.
I wanted to point out that while some people justify the D7K small amount of motion blur in handheld shoots at certain shutter speeds due to wrong shooting techinque acquired with lower pixel density Nikon DSLRs, my FT2 has in fact a much higher pixel density and never experienced this problems.

Of course compacts are different species, but you can't justify this behaviour just because of a bit higher pixel density. Vibrations affect to every DSLR, only that in the D7K to a higher extent.

Seems there're more people concerned with this problem:

"To my eyes the D7000 exhibits mirror slap blur in those photos starting at 1/4, reaches its worst at 1/30, then has tapered off to barely noticeable at 1/125. I don't know if I'd classified it as "bad" because I don't know what the standard should be relative to other DSLRs but compared to the D5100 the D7000's blur seems rather pronounced (I don't see blur on the D5100 photos at any of the tested shutter speeds)."
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3031067

All true and easily mitigated, but you were speaking of shots faster than 1/250s. That's not mirror slap.

I"s this really mirror vibration or is it shutter induced vibration? I found that shooting at high frame rates with my D7000 actually reduced apparent vibration induced softness compared to slow shutter speeds, which is counter-intuitive to the mirror slap theory as the cause. After experimenting with my D7000 at various shutter speeds and using mirror lock up on a tripod, I came to the conclusion that the shutterslap vibration was more of the softness culprit at slow shutter speeds than mirror slap. I also found that anything that added mass (like the vertical grip with battery), to the camera reduced vibration induced softness at slower shutter speeds. A high quality tripod and head really makes a difference as well."
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/41245214

You can use live view to see, it's not a shutter vibration issue

Yes, in my experience I suffered some motion blur shooting at 1/500s while shooting my D7K as steady as I could and holding my breath with the 70-300VR at higher focal lengths.

I understand but that's not caused by shutter or mirror vibration.

The inconsistent low-light AF performance must be user fault too. And it's tendency to overexpose in certain situations...
Don't get me wrong, I liked my D7K, but got stolen so I want to invest my money on a system that has most of the "limitations" of the D7K fixed. Name it D400 (thats what I hope).

The low-light focus issue is a AF sub-mirror calibration issue as I pointed out above. It occurred in a few models and is now easily fixed and very rare in regards latest samples.

Overexposure in certain issues is not a fault of the camera. Live View does it on purpose in certain conditions to match the rear LCD and Focus Point bias needs to be accounted for in PDAF/Matrix

D7000-overexpose see part 2

Reilly Diefenbach
Reilly Diefenbach Forum Pro • Posts: 13,301
Re: Not shutter/Mirror Vibration

Makes me wonder how I got all those razor sharp shots with the D7000 and the 70-300VR at 1/500.

 Reilly Diefenbach's gear list:Reilly Diefenbach's gear list
Nikon D500 Nikon D850
Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 25,678
I know why

Reilly Diefenbach wrote:

Makes me wonder how I got all those razor sharp shots with the D7000 and the 70-300VR at 1/500.

The scene had a Coriolis factor of -5 while your D7000 sample had a shutter vibration factor of +5. The two cancelled each other out resulting in the sharpness you wrongly perceived

Reilly Diefenbach
Reilly Diefenbach Forum Pro • Posts: 13,301
Re: I know why

I need another cup of coffee before I can get my grips around it :^)



 Reilly Diefenbach's gear list:Reilly Diefenbach's gear list
Nikon D500 Nikon D850
Barry Fitzgerald Forum Pro • Posts: 29,888
Re: Not shutter/Mirror Vibration

Mako2011 wrote:

I understand but that's not caused by shutter or mirror vibration.

I'm not so sure whilst I've rarely had problems with SLR's regarding this specific issue..D7k does seem to have more slightly shaky shots even at safe speeds. D90 did not show this from my use of it.

The inconsistent low-light AF performance must be user fault too. And it's tendency to overexpose in certain situations...
Don't get me wrong, I liked my D7K, but got stolen so I want to invest my money on a system that has most of the "limitations" of the D7K fixed. Name it D400 (thats what I hope).

The low-light focus issue is a AF sub-mirror calibration issue as I pointed out above. It occurred in a few models and is now easily fixed and very rare in regards latest samples.

Overexposure in certain issues is not a fault of the camera. Live View does it on purpose in certain conditions to match the rear LCD and Focus Point bias needs to be accounted for in PDAF/Matrix

D7000-overexpose see part 2

The metering quirks are well known but hardly deal breakers on their own it is over biased to the AF point in AF-S, hence your black suit guy can get overexposed by near to a couple of stops, you can still get underexposure with backlit scenes again no big deal we can compensate for this.

D90 IMO is superior for metering less bias to the AF point, no perfect but I feel better overall.

Sub mirror.. I think the problem goes beyond just that. I know the Nikon brochure says "razor sharp AF system" can't say I ever felt that was a good description.

Let's bury this user/settings/pixel density once and for all some folks are just ok about ho hum AF performance, as Mira said she now uses live view because shock..the focus is inconsistent. No idea why it's like that..it's really not half as good as it makes itself out to be. 39 AF points..nice but I'd take just one that could focus accurately!

It's easy to blame users/lenses/settings/pixels..a lot of people have reported problems and most of them are about the AF. Can't all be wrong?

nfpotter Veteran Member • Posts: 4,080
Re: Not shutter/Mirror Vibration
1

Barry Fitzgerald wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:


I understand but that's not caused by shutter or mirror vibration.

I'm not so sure whilst I've rarely had problems with SLR's regarding this specific issue..D7k does seem to have more slightly shaky shots even at safe speeds. D90 did not show this from my use of it.

The inconsistent low-light AF performance must be user fault too. And it's tendency to overexpose in certain situations...
Don't get me wrong, I liked my D7K, but got stolen so I want to invest my money on a system that has most of the "limitations" of the D7K fixed. Name it D400 (thats what I hope).

The low-light focus issue is a AF sub-mirror calibration issue as I pointed out above. It occurred in a few models and is now easily fixed and very rare in regards latest samples.

Overexposure in certain issues is not a fault of the camera. Live View does it on purpose in certain conditions to match the rear LCD and Focus Point bias needs to be accounted for in PDAF/Matrix

D7000-overexpose see part 2

The metering quirks are well known but hardly deal breakers on their own it is over biased to the AF point in AF-S, hence your black suit guy can get overexposed by near to a couple of stops, you can still get underexposure with backlit scenes again no big deal we can compensate for this.

D90 IMO is superior for metering less bias to the AF point, no perfect but I feel better overall.

Sub mirror.. I think the problem goes beyond just that. I know the Nikon brochure says "razor sharp AF system" can't say I ever felt that was a good description.

Let's bury this user/settings/pixel density once and for all some folks are just ok about ho hum AF performance, as Mira said she now uses live view because shock..the focus is inconsistent. No idea why it's like that..it's really not half as good as it makes itself out to be. 39 AF points..nice but I'd take just one that could focus accurately!

It's easy to blame users/lenses/settings/pixels..a lot of people have reported problems and most of them are about the AF. Can't all be wrong?

GOOD LORD.  BARRY.  ENOUGH!!!!!

Mine works EXTREMELY WELL.  As do MANY, MANY OTHERS.

I just took 730 shots of a friend's band in about 2 hours, in a DARK club a couple weeks ago.  So dark I was at ISO 6400, f/2.8 to f/4, and still had to drop SS to 1/80 or slower most of the time.  I got about 80% sharp shots, of MOVING SUBJECTS.  Tell me how horrible that is, for a "consumer" camera.

Just quit.  You say you want to "bury" the issue?  THEN STOP FREAKING POSTING ABOUT IT!!!

Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 25,678
Far less

Barry Fitzgerald wrote:


D90 IMO is superior for metering less bias to the AF point, no perfect but I feel better overall.

Under controlled tests....Hogan points out that the D7000 does this to a much less degree than the D90 and far less than the D80 or previous bodies. It's also very easy to remove it as a variable with simple settings choices.

Sub mirror.. I think the problem goes beyond just that. I know the Nikon brochure says "razor sharp AF system" can't say I ever felt that was a good description.

No, the tungsten light  issue has been well documented now. It's a AF sub-mirror calibration issue that has been corrected. Also not uncommon in many other models and brands.

Let's bury this user/settings/pixel density once and for all some folks are just ok about ho hum AF performance, as Mira said she now uses live view because shock..the focus is inconsistent. No idea why it's like that..it's really not half as good as it makes itself out to be. 39 AF points..nice but I'd take just one that could focus accurately!

It's still far better than and Nikon Digital DX body before it in this class. Understanding how to accurately test focus is also makes for easy differentiation.

It's easy to blame users/lenses/settings/pixels..a lot of people have reported problems and most of them are about the AF. Can't all be wrong?

No, not all.....but by example, many

Reilly Diefenbach
Reilly Diefenbach Forum Pro • Posts: 13,301
Go away, Barry, just go away.
3

You're of absolutely no use to anyone. Go pollute the Fuji or the Pentax forum for a while.  Distribute your expertise more evenly.  Shut up and take some pictures of your native Gibraltar with whatever it is you use and put them up in your empty gallery such that we may all enjoy the fruits of your 30,000 posts.

Or better yet, just go away.

 Reilly Diefenbach's gear list:Reilly Diefenbach's gear list
Nikon D500 Nikon D850
Ed Pulido Regular Member • Posts: 128
Re: Go away, Barry, just go away.

STOP FEEDING THE TROLL PLEASE - if everybody ignored his posts, he would go away soon

 Ed Pulido's gear list:Ed Pulido's gear list
Nikon D750
Reilly Diefenbach
Reilly Diefenbach Forum Pro • Posts: 13,301
Re: Go away, Barry, just go away.
1

Ed, we've tried that and it doesn't work.  Nothing works except a ban, which Barry is heading towards at full speed.  He's already been 86ed from the Sony forum, so they at least are shed of him.

 Reilly Diefenbach's gear list:Reilly Diefenbach's gear list
Nikon D500 Nikon D850
Jim Holtz Senior Member • Posts: 1,106
Re: Go away, Barry, just go away.
1

Ed Pulido wrote:

STOP FEEDING THE TROLL PLEASE - if everybody ignored his posts, he would go away soon



 Jim Holtz's gear list:Jim Holtz's gear list
Nikon D610 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F4G ED VR Nikon D750 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm F4G ED VR Sigma 100-400mm F5-6.3
Barry Fitzgerald Forum Pro • Posts: 29,888
Re: Go away, Barry, just go away.
1

Ignorance is bliss..some users just prefer we don't talk about these real issues.

Sad really..also sad to see some folks ending up slandering people because they can't stand their love of a particular brand damaged.

Really quite amazing how worked up people can get.

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