Why no focus issues with D5100 or D3100 compared with D7000

Started Oct 28, 2012 | Discussions
Ando72 Regular Member • Posts: 413
Re: Why no focus issues with D5100 or D3100 compared with D7000
2

hea wrote:

After reading all comments in B&H and Amazon about these 3 cameras I found almost no issues complaining Back/Bad focus on D3100 and D5100, but lots on D7000.

Also I read on this forum that problem with D7000 is not a problem but a user lack of technique due to size of sensor, I doubt because D5100 has same sensor, but on that camera people appear not to have issues.

If problem is because it is a semi-professional camera with lots of adjustments, again, I do not recall issues with D300 o D700 owners.

All this comment is because I want to buy D7000 but very afraid, because I buy in Texas but I live in Mexico and it is not easy to send to repair, adjust or return the camera.

Thanks

Hi

I recently upgraded from the D5000 (which I believe has the same AF system as the D5100) to the D7000.  Having done extensive research before I purchased, and now having owned and used the camera for a bit over a week, here are my thoughts:

- D7000 is definitely a step up in AF system sophistication from the D5000.

- There are more choices for how you set the AF system, meaning a wider range of possibilities for how it behaves, from full user control to fully automatic.

- There is some simple testing you can do that takes no more than about 2 hours, requires no special equipment or software, eliminates all the variables, and will tell you whether the AF system needs adjustment or not.

- D7000 has AF fine tune, meaning the user can adjust small accuracy errors.  The D5000/D5100 does not have this feature.  I think this causes some people to look for AF errors/accuracy on the D7000 (because they can adjust it), and conversely D5000/5100 users mostly don't bother because there's not much they can do about it.

- In relation to the D300/D700, it's likely most users of those cameras have a deep understanding of their cameras capabilities and either tune what they know can be tuned, and learn to work with aspects that can't be adjusted.

- Internet feedback has a strong negative bias i.e. people are far more likely to complain about problems than they are to post that their camera is OK.  Don't take pure numbers as indicative of the proportion of a problem.  This is further compounded by the large number of variables with a function like autofocus - both camera settings and user variables.  It's really hard to tell if someone has a genuine problem or if there are far too many variables in play to make a sound judgement.

My advice - get the D7000, but be prepared to read the manual, experiment with different settings, do some basic testing, and understand what to do if the testing shows some AF errors.

 Ando72's gear list:Ando72's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon D750 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF Nikkor 85mm f/1.4D Nikon AF-S Nikkor 300mm f/2.8G ED VR II +9 more
Reilly Diefenbach
Reilly Diefenbach Forum Pro • Posts: 13,231
Well, that ought to do it.

Barry scares off another new guy.  Mission accomplished!

Mission Accomplished

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Nikon D500 Nikon D850
phiri Contributing Member • Posts: 969
Re: You can find..

dirtdiver82 wrote:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50110247

Basically saying what I have all along inconsistency in AF and suggests using live view. I just don't think the D7k is that good for AF after owning 2 of them. Some might accept it..I personally do not. I also noted some mirror vibrations at some shutter speeds causing some blur..which I did not on the D90 separate issues but it did show up for me.

I do hope we get beyond the stage of simply saying the AF is complicated, or just settings, users fault of blaming the lenses, pixel density, or limitations of phase detect AF. It's quite possible your idea of decent AF is a million miles away from mine. D7k is IMHO not that good for AF, and I'm not the first person to suggest that either

Totally agreed.

Same here, I also went from the D90 to the D7000 and using the same lens, no matter how I tried ( single AF point, holding my breath ) many of my pics have a little of motion blur quite evident at 100% while the D90 used to have none.

Not to mention that tracking fast moving objects under certain circumstances remained also problematic with the D7000.

Sadly my D7000 has been stoled so I'm thinking on buying a D5100 to keep the same sensor performance until the eventual D7100/D400 shows up, but I'm not considering another D7000.

The D7K feels more responsive than the D90, has better viewfinder, better video, more features, but AFwise, it disappoints me too specially given the 1300€ I paid for it.

Shutter speeds that are adequate to get sharp focus on a low density sensor may not be adequate on a high density sensor. The reason that many people have problems when they upgrade cameras is that people dont want to re-learn the new camera body. Most users take for granted that simply because one gets sharp photos with camera x, one will easily get sharp photos with camera Y. if you google on this forum, there used to be many complaints from people that D40 was way sharper than d90. These similar sentiments have been carried forward in discusiing the d90 vs D7000 and the only similaritiy in the two cases is the increase in number of pixels. I can tell you this, I started with a D40 and then bought the D90. I had just to learn the D90 from its basics. Took me sometime but it was worth it in the end. from then I bought a D700 which I sold after two months simply because it was limiting me in the telephoto shots. I then replaced with a D7000. My first photos with a d7000 were not sharp enough and this is the truth. I practiced a lot trying to understand its usability in different environments. Quickly I got hold of it. Now I can also honestly tell you that the D7000 is truy sharp and just focusses as well even in low light. Of all the cameras I had, the D40 and D700 were the easiest to get sharp results, so this had to with their low pixel counts (the d700 considered low since it was an FF camera). I also shoot mainly in manual mode and spot metering so I know which shutter speeds are adequate for me. With a 50mm f1.8, 1/50 is a minimum shutter speed I use for still objects or for portarits of people that are stable. otherwise it is 1/100s and above for other things. You have to know your comfortable zones with shutters speeds for each focal length.

 phiri's gear list:phiri's gear list
Nikon D7000 Nikon 1 J1 Nikon D600 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G +6 more
phiri Contributing Member • Posts: 969
Re: You can find..
1

Barry Fitzgerald wrote:

phiri wrote:


By the way, have you ever been able to achieve perfect focus with any camera body? If so, can you please post them so that we have a look.

The D7000 is probably the most complained about DSLR for AF from Nikon possibly even any model I've ever seen. Is there a slight hint that there is a reason for this? A bit more than possibly internet hysteria?

The user comments on this forum were mostly akin to blaming the end user, settings, focus shift, higher pixel density (firmly discredited with my 6mp v 4mp test shots), the complicated AF. But where I am standing it's quite simple really..the AF isn't calibrated properly and QC issues are still present.

Moving on yes I am, but as a user who has experience of Nikon I'm quite entitled to comment. I see no reason why anyone would get that upset.

But we can also provide a plausible explanation here. The D7000 is the first Nikon consumer camera to have an advanced focussing system than can easily overwhelm some users. So having many complaints about it does not automatically translate into a poor AF system. Do you see the argument here, these are not equals. As you are moving on, I can only really wish you all the best and please share with us some photos and your experience when you find the AF system that meet your needs

 phiri's gear list:phiri's gear list
Nikon D7000 Nikon 1 J1 Nikon D600 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G +6 more
phiri Contributing Member • Posts: 969
Re: You can find..

Barry Fitzgerald wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50110247

Basically saying what I have all along inconsistency in AF and suggests using live view. I just don't think the D7k is that good for AF after owning 2 of them. Some might accept it..I personally do not. I also noted some mirror vibrations at some shutter speeds causing some blur..which I did not on the D90 separate issues but it did show up for me.

I do hope we get beyond the stage of simply saying the AF is complicated, or just settings, users fault of blaming the lenses, pixel density, or limitations of phase detect AF. It's quite possible your idea of decent AF is a million miles away from mine. D7k is IMHO not that good for AF, and I'm not the first person to suggest that either

Totally agreed.

Same here, I also went from the D90 to the D7000 and using the same lens, no matter how I tried ( single AF point, holding my breath ) many of my pics have a little of motion blur quite evident at 100% while the D90 used to have none.

Not to mention that tracking fast moving objects under certain circumstances remained also problematic with the D7000.

Sadly my D7000 has been stoled so I'm thinking on buying a D5100 to keep the same sensor performance until the eventual D7100/D400 shows up, but I'm not considering another D7000.

The D7K feels more responsive than the D90, has better viewfinder, better video, more features, but AFwise, it disappoints me too specially given the 1300€ I paid for it.

Thanks you it suggests I am not alone in my findings.

I agree about the D7k being more responsive, better video, nicer VF believe me it is a great body overall I really wanted to love it. But the AF issues were just to big to ignore..the motion blur is quite subtle at times, but I think something changed with the mechanism to cause this, it's not something I have seen for hand held shots with many DSLR's but I did see it on some recently with the D7k. I hope Nikon do bring a D7100 out minus AF and other problems.

IMO for the money bargain deal or not the D7000 can't cut it AF wise and overall I can't recommend the body. I can see why it sells well and is so popular..right now for it's price it is the best camera on paper by a good margin. Shame that doesn't come through in real world use.

So you are still looking forward to another Nikon camera? Why with all these choices of camera brands among us? After your episodes with the D90 (3 bodies in a row), and then D7000 (2 bodies in a row) what can possibly change to make the next camera better for you? The odds here are indeed low to be honest with you. It is better just to move to canon or sony or pentax or olympus or samsung etc. That will then give us time to help each other with getting the best out of Nikon Focussing system and better able to identify genuine complaints of faulty products from general unwillingness to master focussing system

 phiri's gear list:phiri's gear list
Nikon D7000 Nikon 1 J1 Nikon D600 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G +6 more
phiri Contributing Member • Posts: 969
Re: You can find..

Barry Fitzgerald wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50110247

Basically saying what I have all along inconsistency in AF and suggests using live view. I just don't think the D7k is that good for AF after owning 2 of them. Some might accept it..I personally do not. I also noted some mirror vibrations at some shutter speeds causing some blur..which I did not on the D90 separate issues but it did show up for me.

I do hope we get beyond the stage of simply saying the AF is complicated, or just settings, users fault of blaming the lenses, pixel density, or limitations of phase detect AF. It's quite possible your idea of decent AF is a million miles away from mine. D7k is IMHO not that good for AF, and I'm not the first person to suggest that either

Totally agreed.

Same here, I also went from the D90 to the D7000 and using the same lens, no matter how I tried ( single AF point, holding my breath ) many of my pics have a little of motion blur quite evident at 100% while the D90 used to have none.

Not to mention that tracking fast moving objects under certain circumstances remained also problematic with the D7000.

Sadly my D7000 has been stoled so I'm thinking on buying a D5100 to keep the same sensor performance until the eventual D7100/D400 shows up, but I'm not considering another D7000.

The D7K feels more responsive than the D90, has better viewfinder, better video, more features, but AFwise, it disappoints me too specially given the 1300€ I paid for it.


IMO for the money bargain deal or not the D7000 can't cut it AF wise and overall I can't recommend the body. I can see why it sells well and is so popular..right now for it's price it is the best camera on paper by a good margin. Shame that doesn't come through in real world use.

It does not come through in the real world, for who, if I may ask? Everyone using a Nikon D7000 must be a Nikon apologist then? I am sure I would not keep mine if it was not good enough for me.

 phiri's gear list:phiri's gear list
Nikon D7000 Nikon 1 J1 Nikon D600 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G +6 more
Jim Holtz Senior Member • Posts: 1,106
Re: You can find..

Barry Fitzgerald wrote:

There are a few other points, average D7k user might spot this..some might not. There are complaints about other Nikon models, but not as many as the D7000. That may or may not reflect the actual situation. Chances are some D7k D3100/5100 users might not even notice issues..some will

There there is the "tolerance" part where users can come to accept things..such as Mira here:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50110247

Basically saying what I have all along inconsistency in AF and suggests using live view. I just don't think the D7k is that good for AF after owning 2 of them. Some might accept it..I personally do not. I also noted some mirror vibrations at some shutter speeds causing some blur..which I did not on the D90 separate issues but it did show up for me.

I do hope we get beyond the stage of simply saying the AF is complicated, or just settings, users fault of blaming the lenses, pixel density, or limitations of phase detect AF. It's quite possible your idea of decent AF is a million miles away from mine. D7k is IMHO not that good for AF, and I'm not the first person to suggest that either

Barry,

You must not have been reading Trenchmonkey's post at the Cafe. 6 D7000 bodies and over 200,000 clicks of sporting events. He's a pro and uses them hard.

http://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showpost.php?p=4046715&postcount=32

http://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showpost.php?p=3981028&postcount=6

http://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showpost.php?p=3969858&postcount=2

http://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showpost.php?p=3941825&postcount=22

These are just a few of his comments.

Jim

 Jim Holtz's gear list:Jim Holtz's gear list
Nikon D610 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F4G ED VR Nikon D750 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm F4G ED VR Sigma 100-400mm F5-6.3
dirtdiver82 New Member • Posts: 24
Re: You can find..

phiri wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50110247

Basically saying what I have all along inconsistency in AF and suggests using live view. I just don't think the D7k is that good for AF after owning 2 of them. Some might accept it..I personally do not. I also noted some mirror vibrations at some shutter speeds causing some blur..which I did not on the D90 separate issues but it did show up for me.

I do hope we get beyond the stage of simply saying the AF is complicated, or just settings, users fault of blaming the lenses, pixel density, or limitations of phase detect AF. It's quite possible your idea of decent AF is a million miles away from mine. D7k is IMHO not that good for AF, and I'm not the first person to suggest that either

Totally agreed.

Same here, I also went from the D90 to the D7000 and using the same lens, no matter how I tried ( single AF point, holding my breath ) many of my pics have a little of motion blur quite evident at 100% while the D90 used to have none.

Not to mention that tracking fast moving objects under certain circumstances remained also problematic with the D7000.

Sadly my D7000 has been stoled so I'm thinking on buying a D5100 to keep the same sensor performance until the eventual D7100/D400 shows up, but I'm not considering another D7000.

The D7K feels more responsive than the D90, has better viewfinder, better video, more features, but AFwise, it disappoints me too specially given the 1300€ I paid for it.

Shutter speeds that are adequate to get sharp focus on a low density sensor may not be adequate on a high density sensor. The reason that many people have problems when they upgrade cameras is that people dont want to re-learn the new camera body. Most users take for granted that simply because one gets sharp photos with camera x, one will easily get sharp photos with camera Y. if you google on this forum, there used to be many complaints from people that D40 was way sharper than d90. These similar sentiments have been carried forward in discusiing the d90 vs D7000 and the only similaritiy in the two cases is the increase in number of pixels. I can tell you this, I started with a D40 and then bought the D90. I had just to learn the D90 from its basics. Took me sometime but it was worth it in the end. from then I bought a D700 which I sold after two months simply because it was limiting me in the telephoto shots. I then replaced with a D7000. My first photos with a d7000 were not sharp enough and this is the truth. I practiced a lot trying to understand its usability in different environments. Quickly I got hold of it. Now I can also honestly tell you that the D7000 is truy sharp and just focusses as well even in low light. Of all the cameras I had, the D40 and D700 were the easiest to get sharp results, so this had to with their low pixel counts (the d700 considered low since it was an FF camera). I also shoot mainly in manual mode and spot metering so I know which shutter speeds are adequate for me. With a 50mm f1.8, 1/50 is a minimum shutter speed I use for still objects or for portarits of people that are stable. otherwise it is 1/100s and above for other things. You have to know your comfortable zones with shutters speeds for each focal length.

I'm aware of the higher pixel density of the D7K.

I'm also aware that my Panasonic FT2 has a crappy 1/2,3" 14MP sensor that has a much greater density than the D7K and has much worse colors, DR, etc, BUT you can take a picture with one hand on a sunny day and despite the noise, the poor colors, etc it's tack sharp.

As Barry said, it's not something consistent. Happens with some shutter speeds to different extents and it's more likely due to vibrations caused by the mirror mechanism. For example, in my experience 1/500s many times looked worse than 1/250s ( w/good lighting and low ISO ). It's been discussed here before.

I chose to live with it while I had my D7K and not to pixel peep my pics using the 70-300VR because I knew what I was going to get. I loved the camera, the colors, the DR, the ISO performance but honestly I always thought there was room for improvement. At that price point.

About low light focusing, I had two D7000s (first one was exchanged because of severe backfocus) and even if the second D7000 focused right on most situations, in indoor tungsten/candle lighting it backfocused like crazy. This is a challenging scenario because of the strong IR light emissions disturbing the PDAF sensors but other cameras just handle it better.
Seems Nikon also realized that there were room for improvement with the D7K AF as they released the D600 with the same AF module but revised. The D600 can focus at f/8. The D7K... well, not. At least in my experience.

 dirtdiver82's gear list:dirtdiver82's gear list
Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED
Reilly Diefenbach
Reilly Diefenbach Forum Pro • Posts: 13,231
Re: You can find..

Hmmm. Perhaps you could upload a few of these unsharp 70-300 shots full size for us to have a look.

 Reilly Diefenbach's gear list:Reilly Diefenbach's gear list
Nikon D500 Nikon D850
Barry Fitzgerald Forum Pro • Posts: 29,888
Re: You can find..

Jim Holtz wrote:

Barry,

You must not have been reading Trenchmonkey's post at the Cafe. 6 D7000 bodies and over 200,000 clicks of sporting events. He's a pro and uses them hard.

http://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showpost.php?p=4046715&postcount=32

http://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showpost.php?p=3981028&postcount=6

http://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showpost.php?p=3969858&postcount=2

http://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showpost.php?p=3941825&postcount=22

These are just a few of his comments.

Jim

I have read his posts and like his shots. However I can only comment on what I have used. Maybe he got a good one..I'm sure he did, not everyone is so fortunate.

Deleted1929 Forum Pro • Posts: 13,050
D7000 over complex for many buyers

With sophistication comes more complexity and more ways for beginners to make mistakes.  This is something like giving a sports car to a learner.  It increases the likelihood of a crash, but that doesn't mean the cars to blame.

On top of that beginner's blame the equipment before they accept they're to blame.  Beginner's think the camera should be even more automated and have better automated AF "guessing" than the lower models.  This is the exact opposite of what a more sophisticated system gives you - it gives you more control, rather than taking over from you.

-- hide signature --

StephenG

prash26np
prash26np New Member • Posts: 6
Re: Why no focus issues with D5100 or D3100 compared with D7000
1

I am really surprised at the number of people who jump to point the D7000 for AF issues, I dont claim to be an expert nor a professional photographer, but I am sure that the D7000, has not failed my focus requirements

I shoot birds and some potraits and landscapes.

I have never had any troubles, or i can say that the newer copies of the d7k with the firmware update are better, maybe.

I have fellow nikonites, using the d7k, none of them reported AF problems either.

a bird in flight, is generally a good measure of AF, though some members may argue about low light sports, I would still argue and believe, birds do make challenging AF subject, especially the medium small ones, 18 inches to 24 inches in height, like water birds.
i have shot birds in different lighting conditions, bright sunlight, sunset, cloudy bad sunlight. I have to say with a 150-500mm F5-F6.3 lens shooting at 1/500 and above, mostly at 500mm and F8 .

The AF has been spot on, i agree the learning curve is a bit steep, but only at the begining, later it really is easy.

The D7000 has 2 user modes and 1 manual mode, i use the 3 for three different settings, preset.

U1 for action

U2 for low light potraits

M for landscape

really very helpful

I have included these samples

for

bright light

Pond Heron, 18 inch bird, shot in AF continuous 21 point Dynamic area

for Low light

Commorant, 18 inch bird, shot in AF continuous 21 point Dynamic area

for low light small bird

less than 12 inches in height

Myna, 12 inch bird, shot in AF continuous 39 point Dynamic area

For Sunset, with sun in the background,

Egret, 18 inch bird, shot in AF continuous 21 point Dynamic area

Not that, i want to prove, my expertise here, i just want people to know, that the AF on the D7000 is very very good, if not at par with the D300s, it is right behind (may be a 0.50 on a scale of 10), and will fulfill, most of your requirements, coupled with the new 2016 pixel RGB metering sensor, the colors on the d7000, is accurate and deep. Not to forget, the best Crop sensor out today.

Jim Holtz Senior Member • Posts: 1,106
Re: You can find..

Barry Fitzgerald wrote:

I have read his posts and like his shots. However I can only comment on what I have used. Maybe he got a good one..I'm sure he did, not everyone is so fortunate.

Barry,

He has 7 D7000's. One did go back for calibration. The rest are spot on out of the box. Will has a staff that shoot D7000's along with other Nikon models.

Jim

 Jim Holtz's gear list:Jim Holtz's gear list
Nikon D610 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm F4G ED VR Nikon D750 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm F4G ED VR Sigma 100-400mm F5-6.3
phiri Contributing Member • Posts: 969
Re: You can find..

dirtdiver82 wrote:

phiri wrote:

dirtdiver82 wrote:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50110247

Basically saying what I have all along inconsistency in AF and suggests using live view. I just don't think the D7k is that good for AF after owning 2 of them. Some might accept it..I personally do not. I also noted some mirror vibrations at some shutter speeds causing some blur..which I did not on the D90 separate issues but it did show up for me.

I do hope we get beyond the stage of simply saying the AF is complicated, or just settings, users fault of blaming the lenses, pixel density, or limitations of phase detect AF. It's quite possible your idea of decent AF is a million miles away from mine. D7k is IMHO not that good for AF, and I'm not the first person to suggest that either

Totally agreed.

Same here, I also went from the D90 to the D7000 and using the same lens, no matter how I tried ( single AF point, holding my breath ) many of my pics have a little of motion blur quite evident at 100% while the D90 used to have none.

Not to mention that tracking fast moving objects under certain circumstances remained also problematic with the D7000.

Sadly my D7000 has been stoled so I'm thinking on buying a D5100 to keep the same sensor performance until the eventual D7100/D400 shows up, but I'm not considering another D7000.

The D7K feels more responsive than the D90, has better viewfinder, better video, more features, but AFwise, it disappoints me too specially given the 1300€ I paid for it.

Shutter speeds that are adequate to get sharp focus on a low density sensor may not be adequate on a high density sensor. The reason that many people have problems when they upgrade cameras is that people dont want to re-learn the new camera body. Most users take for granted that simply because one gets sharp photos with camera x, one will easily get sharp photos with camera Y. if you google on this forum, there used to be many complaints from people that D40 was way sharper than d90. These similar sentiments have been carried forward in discusiing the d90 vs D7000 and the only similaritiy in the two cases is the increase in number of pixels. I can tell you this, I started with a D40 and then bought the D90. I had just to learn the D90 from its basics. Took me sometime but it was worth it in the end. from then I bought a D700 which I sold after two months simply because it was limiting me in the telephoto shots. I then replaced with a D7000. My first photos with a d7000 were not sharp enough and this is the truth. I practiced a lot trying to understand its usability in different environments. Quickly I got hold of it. Now I can also honestly tell you that the D7000 is truy sharp and just focusses as well even in low light. Of all the cameras I had, the D40 and D700 were the easiest to get sharp results, so this had to with their low pixel counts (the d700 considered low since it was an FF camera). I also shoot mainly in manual mode and spot metering so I know which shutter speeds are adequate for me. With a 50mm f1.8, 1/50 is a minimum shutter speed I use for still objects or for portarits of people that are stable. otherwise it is 1/100s and above for other things. You have to know your comfortable zones with shutters speeds for each focal length.

I'm aware of the higher pixel density of the D7K.

I'm also aware that my Panasonic FT2 has a crappy 1/2,3" 14MP sensor that has a much greater density than the D7K and has much worse colors, DR, etc, BUT you can take a picture with one hand on a sunny day and despite the noise, the poor colors, etc it's tack sharp.

As Barry said, it's not something consistent. Happens with some shutter speeds to different extents and it's more likely due to vibrations caused by the mirror mechanism. For example, in my experience 1/500s many times looked worse than 1/250s ( w/good lighting and low ISO ). It's been discussed here before.

I chose to live with it while I had my D7K and not to pixel peep my pics using the 70-300VR because I knew what I was going to get. I loved the camera, the colors, the DR, the ISO performance but honestly I always thought there was room for improvement. At that price point.

About low light focusing, I had two D7000s (first one was exchanged because of severe backfocus) and even if the second D7000 focused right on most situations, in indoor tungsten/candle lighting it backfocused like crazy. This is a challenging scenario because of the strong IR light emissions disturbing the PDAF sensors but other cameras just handle it better.
Seems Nikon also realized that there were room for improvement with the D7K AF as they released the D600 with the same AF module but revised. The D600 can focus at f/8. The D7K... well, not. At least in my experience.

Again here is another confusion. Why would the D7000 not focus at f8? When the d600 is rated to focus at f8, this specification for a lens maximu apeture and not apeture setting on all lenses. This just means that the 300 mm f4 wth 2x TC on the camera, the camera should be able to focus even in lower light. I have no problem with you not being happy with the d7000 but simply to extrapolate that since you are not happy with it then the d7000 must be broken is what I have a problem with. D7000 has been sold in large quantities and surely a percentage of it have been faulty but it is surely a capable camera. For those who have learned about its srengths and weaknesses, they are able to maximise its use. i guess what I am saying is that the d7000's AF systems has its weaknesses too but they are not the ones that most complain about here.

 phiri's gear list:phiri's gear list
Nikon D7000 Nikon 1 J1 Nikon D600 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G +6 more
mistermejia Veteran Member • Posts: 3,340
Re: D7000 over complex for many buyers
2

sjgcit wrote:

With sophistication comes more complexity and more ways for beginners to make mistakes. This is something like giving a sports car to a learner. It increases the likelihood of a crash, but that doesn't mean the cars to blame.

On top of that beginner's blame the equipment before they accept they're to blame. Beginner's think the camera should be even more automated and have better automated AF "guessing" than the lower models. This is the exact opposite of what a more sophisticated system gives you - it gives you more control, rather than taking over from you.

This is what happened to me about two years ago, comming from my D200. I was VERY upset and disappointed and ended up returning the D7000, i thought that piece of crap sucked!! First of all i was shooting in AUTO mode on the dial, and also no matter what, i was getting soft blurry shots. But then i kept reading how good the damm thing was, so i decided to go buy it again and damm!! Soft and blurry photos AGAIN and that is when i realized that the problem was ME and i understood that i was holding a completely different breed of a camera. I didn't even know anything about AF Fine tuning at that time. I have learned a lot with this camera, i feel as if i have gone thru a four semester camera course and up to this day i am still learning it.

In the end i have put into practice everyones advice and began by completely resetting my D7000, i learned how to AF Fine tune each of my lenses, started doubleing or triple shutter speed, mentain steady hands, use appropriate AF modes and I have been blown away and am VERY happy with this $1299 camara (now a $999). Focusing is spot on and it does not back focus anymore after fine tuning all my lenses, if i am getting bad photos is because "I" am doing something wrong. To me, the price is what impresses me the most with this camera model, and franckly this is why i haven't found the need to go FF.

I am sure people DO get bad hardware, but i think in most cases it is the lack of motivation and desire to fix it yourself since newer models are more sofisticated and Nikon does not ship them to you in PLUG & PLAY mode, and this is why some people consider this "unexeptable" for what they are paying.



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Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro Fujifilm X-E1 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Tamron SP AF 70-200mm F/2.8 Di LD (IF) MACRO Fujifilm XF 35mm F1.4 R +6 more
twamers Senior Member • Posts: 1,320
Re: Why no focus issues with D5100 or D3100 compared with D7000

I got my D7000 3 months ago, upgraded from a D5000 which I have been delighted with (and have kept).  I am not an expert at all but the D7000 is a jump up in understanding - I can tell that.  I also knew that before buying - looked at threads and did research before I committed to purchase.  I'm still learning the best auto focus settings and there is a bit of trial and error. That having been said I've got some real good pictures that I've been very happy with (mainly using Nikon 16-85 or Sigma 70-200 2.8).  The D7000 also feels great in my hands and the extra capabilities over the D5000 are so worthwhile.  I've still some way to go but I have never expected to hit excellent shots from day one but overall am very happy the D7000.  I've not fine tuned any of my lenses as bad shots I've had I can generally establish through looking at settings and focus points on View NX or Capture NX2.

Steve Bingham
Steve Bingham Forum Pro • Posts: 26,132
Re: You can find..

Barry Fitzgerald wrote:

AF complaints on every model of DSLR ever made to varying degrees that is.

Lemon bodies will hit the shelves from every maker that is life and a reality. But it should not be so high in numbers that the market is flooded with iffy bodies.

There are a few other points, average D7k user might spot this..some might not. There are complaints about other Nikon models, but not as many as the D7000. That may or may not reflect the actual situation. Chances are some D7k D3100/5100 users might not even notice issues..some will

There there is the "tolerance" part where users can come to accept things..such as Mira here:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50110247

Basically saying what I have all along inconsistency in AF and suggests using live view. I just don't think the D7k is that good for AF after owning 2 of them. Some might accept it..I personally do not. I also noted some mirror vibrations at some shutter speeds causing some blur..which I did not on the D90 separate issues but it did show up for me.

I do hope we get beyond the stage of simply saying the AF is complicated, or just settings, users fault of blaming the lenses, pixel density, or limitations of phase detect AF. It's quite possible your idea of decent AF is a million miles away from mine. D7k is IMHO not that good for AF, and I'm not the first person to suggest that either

Still getting 99.9% in-focus photos using four different Nikon lenses on my D7000 (over the last 2 years). My idea of AF has developed after 50 years as a working pro - the first 20 without autofocus! Might I suggest a nice quiet discussion between you and your camera? You obviously are not communicating well.

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Steve Bingham
www.dustylens.com
www.ghost-town-photography.com

 Steve Bingham's gear list:Steve Bingham's gear list
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Sosua
Sosua Senior Member • Posts: 2,342
My D5100 has sporadic focus issues

I chalk it up to a limitation of using zoom lenses with PDAF to be honest.... there is a reason AF Micro adjust features on higher end DSLR's (Which I used successfully on my D7000, D300 and 5D2).

Lens rentals had a very informative blog entry on this some time back.

My 16-85 struggles at certain focal lengths so I find myself using live view at 85mm for example. Speaking with the Nikon service agents, the combo could only be optimised (at cost) for one focal length on a zoom.

Its not terrible, but something to think about for critical work.

One of the many reasons I'm looking to go full mirrorless in the future.

Otherwise, for those who need DSLR's, Canons new approach for putting microchips in high end optics with data pertaining to that specific copy seems to be a good (albeit expensive) approach.

www.samwaldron.co.nz

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Mako2011
MOD Mako2011 Forum Pro • Posts: 25,572
A solution

dirtdiver82 wrote:


I'm also aware that my Panasonic FT2 has a crappy 1/2,3" 14MP sensor that has a much greater density than the D7K and has much worse colors, DR, etc, BUT you can take a picture with one hand on a sunny day and despite the noise, the poor colors, etc it's tack sharp.

The Panasonic FT2 is a CDAF only camera. To compare realistically you need to shoot the D7K in Live view only (comparing focus).

BTW, to confirm a focus issue with the D7K, a proper CDAF vs PDAF comparison will show it or rule it out.

As Barry said, it's not something consistent. Happens with some shutter speeds to different extents and it's more likely due to vibrations caused by the mirror mechanism. For example, in my experience 1/500s many times looked worse than 1/250s ( w/good lighting and low ISO ). It's been discussed here before.

Barry was never able to actually test for focus issue properly in all 6 bodies he had. Very difficult to draw conclusions in that way. Note though that mirror slap will never be an issue above 1/250s and I have rarely seen it above 1/60 (lens dependent).


.....the second D7000 focused right on most situations, in indoor tungsten/candle lighting it backfocused like crazy. This is a challenging scenario because of the strong IR light emissions disturbing the PDAF sensors but other cameras just handle it better.
Seems Nikon also realized that there were room for improvement with the D7K AF as they released the D600 with the same AF module but revised. The D600 can focus at f/8. The D7K... well, not. At least in my experience.

The tungsten/candle lighting issue is real and affected a few early D7K's. It requires an adjustment of the AF sub mirror and Nikon service now has no problem correcting it.

AS the D7000 actually focuses wide open....I have no problems at f8 (I don't have slow glass with TC's )

sshoihet Senior Member • Posts: 2,628
Re: You can find..

Steve Bingham wrote:


Still getting 99.9% in-focus photos using four different Nikon lenses on my D7000 (over the last 2 years). My idea of AF has developed after 50 years as a working pro - the first 20 without autofocus! Might I suggest a nice quiet discussion between you and your camera? You obviously are not communicating well.

And i have very good results in most cases, even generally in low light...but this past weekend in the clouds and rain, with a moving subject, it was a struggle.  I would have expected it would still be ok with my daughter sitting still on a rock but it wasnt.  It wasn't a case of the camera not obtaining focus, it said the focus was good and it was about 6" behind when that 80-200 afs is usually dead on.

Strangely enough, it seems that i have more trouble with f2.8 lenses and it's not a dof problem because it happens when they're stopped down to f4 or f5.6.  Its not a focus shift problem as i have plenty of sharp images at those apertures.  It seems to be low light, when it's cloudy out which may indicate that it's a certain wavelength of light that's an issue or just a lack of contrast edges.  The line focus sensors were absolutely useless, it was about 3pm so it wasn't THAT dark out

Inside the aquarium facility, where it was much darker, i had very little trouble though i did resort to using active AF for part of the time too in the especially dark areas.

 sshoihet's gear list:sshoihet's gear list
Nikon D7000 Canon EOS M Nikon D600 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 16-85mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR +14 more
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