Please advise, Nikon d800e with 24-70mm v Canon 5d m3 with 24-70mm...

Started Oct 15, 2012 | Discussions
Event_shooter Senior Member • Posts: 1,083
Re: D800e is moire city for that, D800 or 5D3

bronxbombers4 wrote:

Marek07 wrote:

Am looking into finally upgrading my kit,

Choices...

Nikon d800e with Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G...or

Canon 5d mk3 with Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L ll USM

I work in Fashion and Portraiture, and was wondering which Kit would be more suitable or just which would you prefer and why?

Canon seems to be a more popular choice in this Industry but am not sure why!

Pros and Cons would be amazing....

Thank You....

If you got a D800, I'd lean the non-E version, I'd be afraid fabrics might moire like crazy with the D800e and suspect the D800 would be the way to go.

The D800 will certain put more resolution on things and it has a lot more dynamic range at low ISO.

5D3 + 24-70 II might AF a bit better and has, IMO, a nicer user interface.

Sort of depend whether your work demands huge amounts of detail and giant prints and lots of DR or whether you can set up studio shots to easily fit DR into what the 5D3 can do and then the nicer UI and handling might make that the nicer choice. Only you know what sort of scenes you shoot for fashion and portraiture and what client demands are.

I've been shooting the 800E since the day it came out and have NEVER seen a moire issue. It's FUNNY how people that don't own the D800E are always complaining about the moire.

Also funny how no one touts the fact that the camera has THIRTY SIX MP. yes I was shouting because the MP is the story on the 800E NOT the moire.

Until anyone experiences what it's like to push in on 36mp then you will never understand.

bronxbombers4 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,387
Re: D800e is moire city for that, D800 or 5D3
1

Event_shooter wrote:

bronxbombers4 wrote:

Marek07 wrote:

Am looking into finally upgrading my kit,

Choices...

Nikon d800e with Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G...or

Canon 5d mk3 with Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L ll USM

I work in Fashion and Portraiture, and was wondering which Kit would be more suitable or just which would you prefer and why?

Canon seems to be a more popular choice in this Industry but am not sure why!

Pros and Cons would be amazing....

Thank You....

If you got a D800, I'd lean the non-E version, I'd be afraid fabrics might moire like crazy with the D800e and suspect the D800 would be the way to go.

The D800 will certain put more resolution on things and it has a lot more dynamic range at low ISO.

5D3 + 24-70 II might AF a bit better and has, IMO, a nicer user interface.

Sort of depend whether your work demands huge amounts of detail and giant prints and lots of DR or whether you can set up studio shots to easily fit DR into what the 5D3 can do and then the nicer UI and handling might make that the nicer choice. Only you know what sort of scenes you shoot for fashion and portraiture and what client demands are.

I've been shooting the 800E since the day it came out and have NEVER seen a moire issue. It's FUNNY how people that don't own the D800E are always complaining about the moire.

Also funny how no one touts the fact that the camera has THIRTY SIX MP. yes I was shouting because the MP is the story on the 800E NOT the moire.

Until anyone experiences what it's like to push in on 36mp then you will never understand.

That seems hard to believe consider that I've even seen moire on a 7D which is even higher density AND has an AA filter.... and considering that I have seen D800e samples showing a lot of moire on certain fabrics. Maybe it wouldn't happen as much as I expect and be "moire city" but I mean it has to show up at times and I heard a few people complain that it interacted weirdly with some subjects. I'm sure it is great plenty of times though.

But how can you have NEVER seen a moire issue when people even see moire on higher density cameras WITH AA filters at times? Again note that the highest density Canon APS-C would be FORTY-EIGHT MP on FF.

Kabe Luna
Kabe Luna Veteran Member • Posts: 9,493
Re: D800e is moire city for that, D800 or 5D3
4

Event_shooter wrote:

bronxbombers4 wrote:

Marek07 wrote:

Am looking into finally upgrading my kit,

Choices...

Nikon d800e with Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G...or

Canon 5d mk3 with Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L ll USM

I work in Fashion and Portraiture, and was wondering which Kit would be more suitable or just which would you prefer and why?

Canon seems to be a more popular choice in this Industry but am not sure why!

Pros and Cons would be amazing....

Thank You....

If you got a D800, I'd lean the non-E version, I'd be afraid fabrics might moire like crazy with the D800e and suspect the D800 would be the way to go.

The D800 will certain put more resolution on things and it has a lot more dynamic range at low ISO.

5D3 + 24-70 II might AF a bit better and has, IMO, a nicer user interface.

Sort of depend whether your work demands huge amounts of detail and giant prints and lots of DR or whether you can set up studio shots to easily fit DR into what the 5D3 can do and then the nicer UI and handling might make that the nicer choice. Only you know what sort of scenes you shoot for fashion and portraiture and what client demands are.

I've been shooting the 800E since the day it came out and have NEVER seen a moire issue. It's FUNNY how people that don't own the D800E are always complaining about the moire.

Also funny how no one touts the fact that the camera has THIRTY SIX MP. yes I was shouting because the MP is the story on the 800E NOT the moire.

Until anyone experiences what it's like to push in on 36mp then you will never understand.

I had a D800 for 5 months. 36 MP is a neat specification and for a minority of subjects and applications, it's a real boon. But for the majority it's overkill. Maybe that's why you don't hear people touting it. It certainly wasn't enough of an advantage to keep me from stepping back to a 22 MP. For portraits, in practice, 16-24 MP is plenty and 12 MP is nice for head-and-shoulders, if you don't need to crop aggressively or if you're not printing life-size.

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Rexgig0 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,624
Re: Please advise, Nikon d800e with 24-70mm v Canon 5d m3 with 24-70mm...
1

Just from my handling the camera bodies, I would go with the 5D3, over the D800, for a camera I will be carrying and holding while shooting. I love the feel of my Nikon F6, and the feel of D2-series, D700, and D300s Nikons I have handled, but Nikon has now started making non-ergonomic bricks, compared to its previous generation. When I held a D800 body, there seemed to be no way to place my thumb in such a manner that it helped me grip the camera securely. It used to be Canons that felt like bricks, but starting the the 7D, and now the 5D3, it is Canons that have better ergonomics, at least for my hands.

As one who shoots with both Canons and Nikons, there will be no switching brands on my part, so a 5D3 is on my short list, though a D800E might eventually be acquired for tripod use.

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KAllen Veteran Member • Posts: 3,874
Re: Please advise, Nikon d800e with 24-70mm v Canon 5d m3 with 24-70mm...
1

Stepanfo wrote:

Marek07 wrote:

...

Choices...

Nikon d800e with Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G...or

Canon 5d mk3 with Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L ll USM

I work in Fashion and Portraiture, and was wondering which Kit would be more suitable or just which would you prefer and why?

Fashion and portraiture - that calls for the best image quality.

As you see, D800/e is significantly better than 5DIII in dynamic range. These are not only numbers, it has been shown in many tests, that Nikon has nice clean shadows while Canon has a lot of noise in them, making adjusting the files more complicated or impossible.

It also has better colours than Canon. Ignore all that BS about better skin tones from Canon. Canon has unbanaced colour rendition to make people look pinkier thus when a Canon user sees a true colours from Nikon, he simply does not recognise them, because his colour perception has been  ruined by Canon.

Nikon sees colours better than Canon does and how you set the camera and the files is entirelly up to you. You have more possibilities with Nikon. If you like pink people, you can have them with Nikon too, and better than from Canon.

D800/e is the best camera ever made tested by DXO mark yet. Canon 5DmkIII is something around 50th place. True is, that it is the best of all Canon Cameras. Being the best of the worst does not make you good.

If you will photograph a lot of fashion I would not get the E version because of the possible moire effects on the fabric, I would get normal D800 instead.

If you will be getting Nikon, do not forget to get awesome and affordable AF-S 85mm f 1.8 lens too!

I fail to see how you can say anyone camera renders colours better than another, when a lens will balance the colour one way or another.

My 70-200mm will have a different look to my primes and most of them have a bias.

Chuck a Sigma on and you get yellow plus weird contrast.

Kevin.

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KAllen Veteran Member • Posts: 3,874
Re: D800e is moire city for that, D800 or 5D3
1

bronxbombers4 wrote:

Event_shooter wrote:

bronxbombers4 wrote:

Marek07 wrote:

Am looking into finally upgrading my kit,

Choices...

Nikon d800e with Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G...or

Canon 5d mk3 with Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L ll USM

I work in Fashion and Portraiture, and was wondering which Kit would be more suitable or just which would you prefer and why?

Canon seems to be a more popular choice in this Industry but am not sure why!

Pros and Cons would be amazing....

Thank You....

If you got a D800, I'd lean the non-E version, I'd be afraid fabrics might moire like crazy with the D800e and suspect the D800 would be the way to go.

The D800 will certain put more resolution on things and it has a lot more dynamic range at low ISO.

5D3 + 24-70 II might AF a bit better and has, IMO, a nicer user interface.

Sort of depend whether your work demands huge amounts of detail and giant prints and lots of DR or whether you can set up studio shots to easily fit DR into what the 5D3 can do and then the nicer UI and handling might make that the nicer choice. Only you know what sort of scenes you shoot for fashion and portraiture and what client demands are.

I've been shooting the 800E since the day it came out and have NEVER seen a moire issue. It's FUNNY how people that don't own the D800E are always complaining about the moire.

Also funny how no one touts the fact that the camera has THIRTY SIX MP. yes I was shouting because the MP is the story on the 800E NOT the moire.

Until anyone experiences what it's like to push in on 36mp then you will never understand.

That seems hard to believe consider that I've even seen moire on a 7D which is even higher density AND has an AA filter.... and considering that I have seen D800e samples showing a lot of moire on certain fabrics. Maybe it wouldn't happen as much as I expect and be "moire city" but I mean it has to show up at times and I heard a few people complain that it interacted weirdly with some subjects. I'm sure it is great plenty of times though.

But how can you have NEVER seen a moire issue when people even see moire on higher density cameras WITH AA filters at times? Again note that the highest density Canon APS-C would be FORTY-EIGHT MP on FF.

The clue might be in his name event shooter, if it's horses jumping fences the chances of it being tripod sharp are slim. Even if it isn't horses the chances of it being lots of different fabric close-up are slim.

I get moire on my 1D X with buildings, I think it has a weak AA filter, but it does have one.

Moire exists, it would be fool hardy not to test  for it in the ops intended use. 36mp of rainbow colours are not a lot of use.

Kevin.

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MayaTlab0
MayaTlab0 Senior Member • Posts: 2,359
Re: Clarification

bobn2 wrote:

MayaTlab0 wrote:

Slideshow Bob wrote:

Vivid1 wrote:

Read your own post - you clearly equated fstop with dynamic range.

No f1.2 is used very little - but try it outside an prepare to be amazed.

No, I commented on you putting DR down as being worthless, but talking up f/1.2 as if it makes all the difference. Neither of the points you made is necessarily correct.

"D800 and d800e are primarily landscapers cameras and 5dIII for everything else"? Are you kidding? Is this supposed to be good advice? What can you photograph with a 5DIII that you can't photograph with a D800? What "pros" does the 5DIII have that allows it to shoot "everything"? and what "cons" does the D800 have that restricts it's use to landscapes?

SB

I don't think the D800 is restricted to landscapes, but there surely are areas in which it won't excel at all. One of them, for example, is street photography.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/42498384

LOL

-- hide signature --

Bob

Classifying these pictures as "street photography" would be quite controversial. It's not because a picture is shot in the street that it's a "street photography" picture, although the genre isn't exactly well-defined.

There are two reasons why for these pictures the D800 worked : the focal length, which put so much distance between the subject and the photographer that certain issues with the D800 don't matter, such as its shutter sound, and the fact that none of these pictures seem to display requirement for a very high speed of operation (changing settings I mean, not AF).

Now, these may provide an example for a situation where the D800 may very well indeed do the job as a street photography camera (if you consider these street photography). I never said that the D800 won't do any street photography picture, but that it's a genre it won't excel at at all, and it would take a serious amount of bad faith to say the contrary.

To be fair, I'm not exactly fond of DSLRs for that genre anyway, although the 5D III is the first DSLR I don't dislike or maybe even enjoy for that sort of photography.

Astrophotographer 10 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,483
Re: Please advise, Nikon d800e with 24-70mm v Canon 5d m3 with 24-70mm...

+1

Its the class leader in image quality at present.

Greg.

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bobn2
bobn2 Forum Pro • Posts: 55,688
Re: Clarification
1

MayaTlab0 wrote:

bobn2 wrote:

MayaTlab0 wrote:

Slideshow Bob wrote:

Vivid1 wrote:

Read your own post - you clearly equated fstop with dynamic range.

No f1.2 is used very little - but try it outside an prepare to be amazed.

No, I commented on you putting DR down as being worthless, but talking up f/1.2 as if it makes all the difference. Neither of the points you made is necessarily correct.

"D800 and d800e are primarily landscapers cameras and 5dIII for everything else"? Are you kidding? Is this supposed to be good advice? What can you photograph with a 5DIII that you can't photograph with a D800? What "pros" does the 5DIII have that allows it to shoot "everything"? and what "cons" does the D800 have that restricts it's use to landscapes?

SB

I don't think the D800 is restricted to landscapes, but there surely are areas in which it won't excel at all. One of them, for example, is street photography.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/42498384

LOL

-- hide signature --

Bob

Classifying these pictures as "street photography" would be quite controversial.

Only if you're wanting to generate an artificial controversy. They are 'street photography', pure and simple.

It's not because a picture is shot in the street that it's a "street photography" picture, although the genre isn't exactly well-defined.

Exactly, but now you want to define it to exclude these photos.

There are two reasons why for these pictures the D800 worked : the focal length, which put so much distance between the subject and the photographer that certain issues with the D800 don't matter, such as its shutter sound,

The shutter sound isn't really an issue. Yes, it's louder than the 5DIII in quiet mode. But it's not very obtrusive in the street. I've taken plenty of street photo's. The shutter caused not a stir, no-one even looked round to see what the noise was. Actually, the background noise in a typical street is enough to make either camera inaudible. There is an ethical question about 'stealth' photoethnography, in any case. Typically, your subjects should be aware that their photo is being taken.

none of these pictures seem to display requirement for a very high speed of operation (changing settings I mean, not AF).

Which is a complete red herring. It is faster to change most of the settings on a D800 than it is a Canon. That's why Nikons have so many buttons, takes longer to learn but once you do, and get it set up to your preference, you have a button or dial right under a finger for every setting that you want to change. There is a bit of disquiet amongst Nikonians that the AF settings are now 'button and dial' rather than direct switches, but it's still more direct than Canon.

Now, these may provide an example for a situation where the D800 may very well indeed do the job as a street photography camera (if you consider these street photography). I never said that the D800 won't do any street photography picture, but that it's a genre it won't excel at at all, and it would take a serious amount of bad faith to say the contrary.

I think the 'bad faith' is going the other way. No FF DSLR would be the tool of choice, but the D800 is fully as capable as the 5DIII for this genre. The one and only shortcoming is the shutter sound, but as I said, that is overplayed. The D800 also has important advantages, one being spot metering of the AF point - lets you focus on a face of the centre of the frame and meter to get that exposed right without 'meter recompose'. The face detection and tracking in the AF really works also, and is potentially a boon for photoethnography - a feature that the 5DIII does not have.

To be fair, I'm not exactly fond of DSLRs for that genre anyway, although the 5D III is the first DSLR I don't dislike or maybe even enjoy for that sort of photography.

Have you tried using a D800 fo this genre?

-- hide signature --

Bob

MayaTlab0
MayaTlab0 Senior Member • Posts: 2,359
Re: Clarification
1

bobn2 wrote:

MayaTlab0 wrote:

bobn2 wrote:

MayaTlab0 wrote:

Slideshow Bob wrote:

Vivid1 wrote:

Read your own post - you clearly equated fstop with dynamic range.

No f1.2 is used very little - but try it outside an prepare to be amazed.

No, I commented on you putting DR down as being worthless, but talking up f/1.2 as if it makes all the difference. Neither of the points you made is necessarily correct.

"D800 and d800e are primarily landscapers cameras and 5dIII for everything else"? Are you kidding? Is this supposed to be good advice? What can you photograph with a 5DIII that you can't photograph with a D800? What "pros" does the 5DIII have that allows it to shoot "everything"? and what "cons" does the D800 have that restricts it's use to landscapes?

SB

I don't think the D800 is restricted to landscapes, but there surely are areas in which it won't excel at all. One of them, for example, is street photography.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/42498384

LOL

-- hide signature --

Bob

Classifying these pictures as "street photography" would be quite controversial.

Only if you're wanting to generate an artificial controversy. They are 'street photography', pure and simple.

It's not because a picture is shot in the street that it's a "street photography" picture, although the genre isn't exactly well-defined.

Exactly, but now you want to define it to exclude these photos.

Let it be then : I think (personal opinion) that it's the interaction between a subject and its environment, most of the time a populated area. If it's just a picture of someone or a group of people, it's more or less related to a candid portrait (assuming it wasn't posed). If it's just the environment, it's more or less related to urban landscape. It requires to be in presence of something happening. Whether this interaction comes from the subject itself, several people, or is consciously the work of the photographer's framing, whether the environment is explicit or not, there needs to be something more than just a person in an urban setting. By that token, I'd say the first picture could possibly fall into the genre (where the interaction could be the separation of the subject from its environment by exploiting the clair / obscure lighting present at the moment), the others less likely.


There are two reasons why for these pictures the D800 worked : the focal length, which put so much distance between the subject and the photographer that certain issues with the D800 don't matter, such as its shutter sound,

The shutter sound isn't really an issue. Yes, it's louder than the 5DIII in quiet mode. But it's not very obtrusive in the street. I've taken plenty of street photo's. The shutter caused not a stir, no-one even looked round to see what the noise was. Actually, the background noise in a typical street is enough to make either camera inaudible. There is an ethical question about 'stealth' photoethnography, in any case. Typically, your subjects should be aware that their photo is being taken.

There's a problem in this counter-argument for two reasons :

1) If "typically, your subjects should be aware that their photo is being taken", then I suppose none of the pictures in the link you provided can be labelled as street photography. Given their subjects' expressions and the use of a 135mm lens, I doubt anyone of them was aware their picture was being taken.

2) This is again, assuming that "street photography" has to be taken in the middle of a street, and a busy one at that. Many photographs typically considered "street photographs" would prove the contrary. Under many circumstances a typical reflex's shutter noise will be a liability.

none of these pictures seem to display requirement for a very high speed of operation (changing settings I mean, not AF).

Which is a complete red herring. It is faster to change most of the settings on a D800 than it is a Canon. That's why Nikons have so many buttons, takes longer to learn but once you do, and get it set up to your preference, you have a button or dial right under a finger for every setting that you want to change. There is a bit of disquiet amongst Nikonians that the AF settings are now 'button and dial' rather than direct switches, but it's still more direct than Canon.

This works as long as for ever changing situations you only need to change one setting at a time. Most of the time though you'll want to change several settings at the same time for a given situation, since typical street photography is likely to require lighting-fast reactions to capture the so-called "moment". That's where the Canon's custom modes are quite useful. Second, it's also got a bunch of very useful features, such as the ones you can associate with the preview button (the ability to change SEVERAL AF parameters at the same time - which is like having two AF "custom modes" for each custom mode, or the switch between one shot and ai servo). The 1DX goes quite a bit further with this philosophy (changing several parameters while pressing a button), but unfortunately the 5D III did not get it (booo Canon). You can also add to this several other things, like the fact that the dials on the Canon click more positively into place, which makes it easier to operate it without looking at it. Usually, all I need to change on the Canon is the custom mode, whether pressing the preview button or not, and occasionally compensating the exposure, change the aperture, or locking the exposure or AF. I never have to "hold a button and turn a dial", because of the other features it's got. With my D700 or the D800, I'd have to turn several dials, and press several buttons + turning dials to get the same thing I'd get by just turning the Canon's mode dial one notch or press the preview button.

Now, there's one thing I think is useful on the D800, it's the possibility to change the metering mode while pressing the front FN buttons.

Now, these may provide an example for a situation where the D800 may very well indeed do the job as a street photography camera (if you consider these street photography). I never said that the D800 won't do any street photography picture, but that it's a genre it won't excel at at all, and it would take a serious amount of bad faith to say the contrary.

I think the 'bad faith' is going the other way. No FF DSLR would be the tool of choice, but the D800 is fully as capable as the 5DIII for this genre. The one and only shortcoming is the shutter sound, but as I said, that is overplayed. The D800 also has important advantages, one being spot metering of the AF point - lets you focus on a face of the centre of the frame and meter to get that exposed right without 'meter recompose'. The face detection and tracking in the AF really works also, and is potentially a boon for photoethnography - a feature that the 5DIII does not have.

That the shutter sound of the D800 is fine for street photography is your opinion, obviously one which I don't share at all.

Face detection can sometimes be useful, but not as much as you'd like to think it is, for several reasons. First, if street photography is all about taking picture of faces, it sounds to me very much like a portrait. It can be, but it's not always the case. Second, this obviously is mostly useful in auto AF point selection mode, something not always very useful for street photography (it can be, but only at the right time for specific situations, mostly when you know how the AF will react and can predict its guess, saving you time to move the AF point or focus and recompose).

This is all assuming AF is useful for street. A manual lens with depth-of-field scale is probably overall just as useful, sometimes better, sometimes worse than a comparable AF lens.

To be fair, I'm not exactly fond of DSLRs for that genre anyway, although the 5D III is the first DSLR I don't dislike or maybe even enjoy for that sort of photography.

Have you tried using a D800 fo this genre?

I've tried to use its predecessor for this genre. Wasn't satisfactory, and the D800 did not provide sufficient improvements in terms of UI and shutter sound to be any better. In fact it's worse in some ways (as you said, more "press button and turn a dial", but without the rest to make it work (mostly, custom modes).

JamieTux Veteran Member • Posts: 4,072
Re: Clarification

This works as long as for ever changing situations you only need to change one setting at a time. Most of the time though you'll want to change several settings at the same time for a given situation, since typical street photography is likely to require lighting-fast reactions to capture the so-called "moment". That's where the Canon's custom modes are quite useful. Second, it's also got a bunch of very useful features, such as the ones you can associate with the preview button (the ability to change SEVERAL AF parameters at the same time - which is like having two AF "custom modes" for each custom mode, or the switch between one shot and ai servo). The 1DX goes quite a bit further with this philosophy (changing several parameters while pressing a button), but unfortunately the 5D III did not get it (booo Canon). You can also add to this several other things, like the fact that the dials on the Canon click more positively into place, which makes it easier to operate it without looking at it. Usually, all I need to change on the Canon is the custom mode, whether pressing the preview button or not, and occasionally compensating the exposure, change the aperture, or locking the exposure or AF. I never have to "hold a button and turn a dial", because of the other features it's got. With my D700 or the D800, I'd have to turn several dials, and press several buttons + turning dials to get the same thing I'd get by just turning the Canon's mode dial one notch or press the preview button.

Now, there's one thing I think is useful on the D800, it's the possibility to change the metering mode while pressing the front FN buttons.

Unless something drastic has changed for the worse...  You can change AF operation mode with an FN botton on the front on Nikon too - I used to to cycle between number of expansion points on the D700.

You could also set whole custom menus up (4 for camera function and 4 for image settings) on the Nikon, it was one of my most used features when I was using the D300 and D700.  So I'm not really sure where Canon wins here - I think it's more of a case of which are you more familiar with.

I'll leave the 2 of you to argue the rest, just thought that the above looked wrong to me.

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bobn2
bobn2 Forum Pro • Posts: 55,688
Re: Clarification
1

JamieTux wrote:

I'll leave the 2 of you to argue the rest, just thought that the above looked wrong to me.

I'd already decided to butt out. It was clearly a case of 'exactly what I like is the only useable thing' syndrome, no point arguing further.

-- hide signature --

Bob

MayaTlab0
MayaTlab0 Senior Member • Posts: 2,359
Re: Clarification
1

JamieTux wrote :

Unless something drastic has changed for the worse... You can change AF operation mode with an FN botton on the front on Nikon too - I used to to cycle between number of expansion points on the D700.

You cannot do what you can do with the 5D III. Yes, you can press the front button, and THEN turn a dial to change the AF expansion points. What you cannot do, is REGISTER in the menu several AF parameters that will automatically be ALL changed WHILE pressing the preview button.

You could also set whole custom menus up (4 for camera function and 4 for image settings) on the Nikon, it was one of my most used features when I was using the D300 and D700. So I'm not really sure where Canon wins here - I think it's more of a case of which are you more familiar with.

The User banks and Custom user banks on the Nikon are not as functional as the custom modes on the Canon. First, they're dumb, they don't remember changes (if you want them to). Second, they're slow to access (certainly not the sort of thing you can do blind by just turning a dial in a fraction of a second). Third, they're separated in two between normal user banks and custom settings banks. The result is that while they may be useful when going from one shooting session to another, they're just useless in a street photography situation.

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