Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

Started Oct 7, 2012 | Questions
Billx08 Forum Pro • Posts: 11,373
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

Fathom wrote:
 . . .

I do hope if ever I plunge towards the D800, I would get a unit that's AF issue free. I'm just really interested if people can really shoot this handheld during low light situations. Indoors, and people socializing and kids playing and still get tack-sharp images with or without a flash.

Since you're interested in both the D800 and D600, I'd say that shooting in very good light with the best shot discipline and a good, solid tripod if necessary, you and I and most people would have to look veeery carefully at 100% or higher to see significant differences between the D800 and the D600. I recall a number of new D3x owners complaining about not being able to see higher IQ compared to what they were getting from their D3, and that difference should have been far easier to see. This was about the time when many DSLR users started taking shot discipline much more seriously.

Indoors in low light, the camera motion due to shooting hand held will produce so much more blur compared to shooting on a tripod that it would totally swamp the differences between the 24mp and 36mp sensors. You might be able to see a slightly better image from the D800 if the flash is used, the focal length isn't too long and the flash is using somewhat less than full output power. But even then I doubt that you'd be able to see a difference unless you're pixel peeping on a monitor or looking very closely at huge prints.

If you have shot in low light and handheld, maybe you could help me decide by posting images. Because a D800 would be my choice given its features and longevity... as long as there are no issues shooting it handheld and of course, the dreaded AF issue. Thanks for replying on this question thread.

Examining hand held photos won't help you very much because it's not like comparing two different cameras, both shooting at 1/500th second or both using an f/2.8 aperture. The ability to hand hold cameras steadily varies tremendously from person to person and for a given person from shot to shot, and as I think that I showed above, motion blur will usually be too great to allow the D800 to outshine the D600. They both would be able to produce better images than a D700, but that's only because they have similarly better high ISO performance. The reasons you gave for preferring the D800, features and longevity, could well make it worth the higher price, especially if you prefer the larger, heavier D800 body. But since you've already stated that if you could afford the D4 you'd prefer it despite its much lower resolution, I can't really understand why the D600's even higher resolution would be a concern just because it's not as high as the D800. So it seems a bit simpler. Just put a price on how much you value the D800's features and additional longevity and the decision should be easier to make.

SergeyGreen
SergeyGreen Contributing Member • Posts: 582
For low light they are almost equal ..

Fathom wrote:

Though I’ve read in other posts that you would still need that higher shot discipline for the D600 because of its 24 MPX resolution. The difference is that the supposed motion blur that could produce in the D600 when shooting handheld is that if it’s “hidden” on the D600, it’s going to be “tiny” on the D800.

I think the motion blur is more relevant to the longer focal length than how many pixels behind it. Did not take me long to discover that I get far more keepers with D800 than I had with D300. Another point, as you already mentioned above, is the the shutter speed. If you photograph children (as portraits and such) you will probably want to use fast glass at wide open. In a bright sunny day it may definitely put the camera to the limit, which D600 may or may not be able to overcome. Other than that the D600 is a bang for a bug, what to say, you can't really go wrong with either.

-- hide signature --

-sergey

OP Fathom Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

Billx08 wrote:

Fathom wrote:
 . . .

I do hope if ever I plunge towards the D800, I would get a unit that's AF issue free. I'm just really interested if people can really shoot this handheld during low light situations. Indoors, and people socializing and kids playing and still get tack-sharp images with or without a flash.

Since you're interested in both the D800 and D600, I'd say that shooting in very good light with the best shot discipline and a good, solid tripod if necessary, you and I and most people would have to look veeery carefully at 100% or higher to see significant differences between the D800 and the D600. I recall a number of new D3x owners complaining about not being able to see higher IQ compared to what they were getting from their D3, and that difference should have been far easier to see. This was about the time when many DSLR users started taking shot discipline much more seriously.

Indoors in low light, the camera motion due to shooting hand held will produce so much more blur compared to shooting on a tripod that it would totally swamp the differences between the 24mp and 36mp sensors. You might be able to see a slightly better image from the D800 if the flash is used, the focal length isn't too long and the flash is using somewhat less than full output power. But even then I doubt that you'd be able to see a difference unless you're pixel peeping on a monitor or looking very closely at huge prints.

If you have shot in low light and handheld, maybe you could help me decide by posting images. Because a D800 would be my choice given its features and longevity... as long as there are no issues shooting it handheld and of course, the dreaded AF issue. Thanks for replying on this question thread.

Examining hand held photos won't help you very much because it's not like comparing two different cameras, both shooting at 1/500th second or both using an f/2.8 aperture. The ability to hand hold cameras steadily varies tremendously from person to person and for a given person from shot to shot, and as I think that I showed above, motion blur will usually be too great to allow the D800 to outshine the D600. They both would be able to produce better images than a D700, but that's only because they have similarly better high ISO performance. The reasons you gave for preferring the D800, features and longevity, could well make it worth the higher price, especially if you prefer the larger, heavier D800 body. But since you've already stated that if you could afford the D4 you'd prefer it despite its much lower resolution, I can't really understand why the D600's even higher resolution would be a concern just because it's not as high as the D800. So it seems a bit simpler. Just put a price on how much you value the D800's features and additional longevity and the decision should be easier to make.

Hi Billx08

Thanks for replying, Bill. Actually, the concern is that which body would offer more usable to keepsake images (it has to be as sharp as it could process). Just like what I replied to a comment on this thread, I would not want to regret the decision in choosing the wrong camera.
I'm examining a friends' shoot at a bar with a band playing. It's extremely low light and I'm seeing quite a number of blurry images. But I do see some keepsakes images that to my eyes are slightly blurred but definitely worth giving to clients. If there would be a way to know that the D600 performed similarly, then definitely the D800 would be a better investment in this case (again, as long as the unit has no problem with its AF, aka the infamous left focus issue).
Many are already giving the D600 positive reviews (of course some are negatives especially with the oil/dust issues on their sensors evident even if newly bought) on which AF performance is near-problem free as opposed to the D800 with people having a challenging time getting tack-sharp images.
Adding to which is that the reason it's hard to really make a decision is that our country does not have a return or exchange policy on cameras once the shutter starts counting.

bobn2
bobn2 Forum Pro • Posts: 61,396
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.
2

jimofcan wrote:

goshigoo wrote:

(I don't really own D600/D800, but I have used both of them extensively)
I think it is the same as D600 if you resize your D800 image to 24M ?

Please correct me if I am wrong
a 24M image resized from 36M should be sharper than a native 24M image.

Resizing an image from 36M down to 24M would, in my opinion result is a less sharp image than one from a native 24M sensor. Taking an image 7360 x 4912 pixels and reducing it to 6016 x 4016 pixels is taking 1.23 pixels and repackaging it as 1 pixel.

The 36MP result will be sharper - resampling if properly done will not lose information compared with original sampling at the same rate. The main benefit of the 36MP will be in the higher cut AA filter, which will allow better microcontrast in the final image.

-- hide signature --

Bob

OP Fathom Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: For low light they are almost equal ..

SergeyGreen wrote:

Fathom wrote:

Though I’ve read in other posts that you would still need that higher shot discipline for the D600 because of its 24 MPX resolution. The difference is that the supposed motion blur that could produce in the D600 when shooting handheld is that if it’s “hidden” on the D600, it’s going to be “tiny” on the D800.

I think the motion blur is more relevant to the longer focal length than how many pixels behind it. Did not take me long to discover that I get far more keepers with D800 than I had with D300. Another point, as you already mentioned above, is the the shutter speed. If you photograph children (as portraits and such) you will probably want to use fast glass at wide open. In a bright sunny day it may definitely put the camera to the limit, which D600 may or may not be able to overcome. Other than that the D600 is a bang for a bug, what to say, you can't really go wrong with either.

Hi SergeyGreen

Thanks for your prompt response. It's interesting that you're getting a lot of keeper images with the D800 than the D300. And I'm sure you're loving your unit. And I understand your point and opening the aperture wide open in shooting kids. Yes, it would be a problem if it's at broad daylight and that the 1/4000 shutter won't prevent overexposure (assuming there's no ND filter around).

Astrophotographer 10 Forum Pro • Posts: 12,885
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.
3

I have D800E only.

I would have thought that if motion blur is a worry then use fast lenses, high ISO and VR lenses.

Use auto ISO and set min shutter speed high enough to counteract motion blur.

I don't quite get the motion blur argument. Any camera has motion blur. That's the whole point of VR lenses. It isn't a function of the sensor its a function of motion when taking the photo. The argument must then be its more visible on a D800/E than a lesser MP sensor. Not sure why that would be but it seems to be taken as true. However I would argue you would get better gain against motion blur by using VR lenses or a tripod/monopod.

I use my D800E for nightscapes, family photography and landscape/panoramas.  For kids type snaps these are usually handheld but at highish shutter speeds. Plus I use mirror lockup.

But then D600 has all that as well. I figure there is no D600E, that D800E is absolutely the best Nikon for image quality so if that is mostly important then get D800E. There is no D600E.

If you are the sort of person who will want the slightly better camera that the D800/E camera is you know you will not be happy with a D600 just because the D800 is that little bit better in all ways.

D600 though seems to be a superb camera. D800E is just that bit better and more polished overall.

Greg.

 Astrophotographer 10's gear list:Astrophotographer 10's gear list
Sony a7R II Sony a7R III Sony FE 55mm F1.8 Zeiss Batis 85mm F1.8 Zeiss Loxia 21mm F2.8 +1 more
OP Fathom Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

Astrophotographer 10 wrote:

I have D800E only.

I would have thought that if motion blur is a worry then use fast lenses, high ISO and VR lenses.

Use auto ISO and set min shutter speed high enough to counteract motion blur.

I don't quite get the motion blur argument. Any camera has motion blur. That's the whole point of VR lenses. It isn't a function of the sensor its a function of motion when taking the photo. The argument must then be its more visible on a D800/E than a lesser MP sensor. Not sure why that would be but it seems to be taken as true. However I would argue you would get better gain against motion blur by using VR lenses or a tripod/monopod.

I use my D800E for nightscapes, family photography and landscape/panoramas.  For kids type snaps these are usually handheld but at highish shutter speeds. Plus I use mirror lockup.

But then D600 has all that as well. I figure there is no D600E, that D800E is absolutely the best Nikon for image quality so if that is mostly important then get D800E. There is no D600E.

If you are the sort of person who will want the slightly better camera that the D800/E camera is you know you will not be happy with a D600 just because the D800 is that little bit better in all ways.

D600 though seems to be a superb camera. D800E is just that bit better and more polished overall.

Greg.

Hi Greg

Thanks for your reply. Point taken. I'm sure the D800E would supposedly be more awesome than the D800 except that the official distributor here in our country, has only the D800 in stock. So it's only the D800 or D600 for me.

I'm sure mirror lock up would avoid motion blur more. If only that feature would just be as fast in processing images as flicking the shutter during celebratory events.

Should I be choosing the D800, I really have no choice but to ramp up the ISO to possibly a normal rate of 1600 instead of my usual 800 for low light situations. Max at 3200.

Maybe, it could be an advantage that I'm a Manual shooter. I only have to do my best to recall in shooting at higher speeds (even if the meter says I'm underexposed) when shooting with this camera while the D700 is on my other hand.

Your response is very much appreciated.

5tve Contributing Member • Posts: 678
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

Fathom wrote:

5tve wrote:

No D600 but I do have the D700 , D7000 & D800.

High ISO noise & Dynamic Range  pretty much identical.

Shooting candid's photo journalism  the D600 has the advantage of a quieter  shutter & is less conspicuous. Autofocus sensitivity only down to -1EV which is not so good as the -2EV of the D800.

The C1 & C2 custom banks are better on the D600  & I believe you get more shots out of the battery.

The D600 has 5.5fps at  24MP against the D800's  5fps 1.2 crop 25MP or with the grip & AA batteries 6fps DX crop 15MP

Pretty much everything else apart from price advantage to the D800.

Any camera shake will look worse with the D800 viewing at 100% on your monitor, when you post the image on the web or print them at the same size as the D600  the same amount of camera shake will never look worse.

Hi 5tve

Thanks for replying. I get what you mean. Images shot with the D600 would somehow get away more than the D800 and with downsampling and all, things would be close to similar results. Which could give the D800 a slight disadvantage because of the additional workflow of downsampling and rendering those humungous files. I'm planning to shoot at max in the 14-bit lossless compressed format [which is still gigantic at 42MB average file size. and my Macbook Pro has only 4GB ram which would take processing forever. ]

I'm not sure you understand properly  what I meant.

The D600 would have no advantage over the D800 regarding camera shake.

If the D600 & D800 both used the same lens & were placed on a working  spin dryer for support & you used a remote to take the same picture at the same time you'd get the same amount of camera shake & when you viewed the images on your PC at the same size say 100% for the D600 you would be viewing at around 70%  (guess)  on the D800 they'd look the same.

D600 or D800 & only 4GB  ram  filesize is going to be you biggest problem.

maybe shooting jpeg would be a good idea when shooting handheld & low light , you are never going to print them large or maximise the potential  36MP resolution anyway.

I took this image saturday night with my D800 its a jpeg quality set to small & size to basic  which

=  a file size of 1.55MB & dimension 2456 x 3680 pixels  this is untouched SOC

The only light was the TV ISO 25,600

And this is after processing in Lightroom

I have not  had to resize them to post here. Click on the original beneath the photo to see them full size .

I'm pretty sure that if I'd used a D600 to take the photo it would have looked the same.

If I'd used my D700 it would have looked worse because it has less dynamic range so the colour fades & the noise because of the larger pixels is much coarser ,I'd have probably converted it to a nice black & white.

 5tve's gear list:5tve's gear list
Nikon D7000 Sony a6000 OnePlus One
OP Fathom Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

5tve wrote:


Fathom wrote:

5tve wrote:

No D600 but I do have the D700 , D7000 & D800.

High ISO noise & Dynamic Range  pretty much identical.

Shooting candid's photo journalism  the D600 has the advantage of a quieter  shutter & is less conspicuous. Autofocus sensitivity only down to -1EV which is not so good as the -2EV of the D800.

The C1 & C2 custom banks are better on the D600  & I believe you get more shots out of the battery.

The D600 has 5.5fps at  24MP against the D800's  5fps 1.2 crop 25MP or with the grip & AA batteries 6fps DX crop 15MP

Pretty much everything else apart from price advantage to the D800.

Any camera shake will look worse with the D800 viewing at 100% on your monitor, when you post the image on the web or print them at the same size as the D600  the same amount of camera shake will never look worse.

Hi 5tve

Thanks for replying. I get what you mean. Images shot with the D600 would somehow get away more than the D800 and with downsampling and all, things would be close to similar results. Which could give the D800 a slight disadvantage because of the additional workflow of downsampling and rendering those humungous files. I'm planning to shoot at max in the 14-bit lossless compressed format [which is still gigantic at 42MB average file size. and my Macbook Pro has only 4GB ram which would take processing forever. ]

I'm not sure you understand properly  what I meant.

The D600 would have no advantage over the D800 regarding camera shake.

If the D600 & D800 both used the same lens & were placed on a working  spin dryer for support & you used a remote to take the same picture at the same time you'd get the same amount of camera shake & when you viewed the images on your PC at the same size say 100% for the D600 you would be viewing at around 70%  (guess)  on the D800 they'd look the same.

D600 or D800 & only 4GB  ram  filesize is going to be you biggest problem.

maybe shooting jpeg would be a good idea when shooting handheld & low light , you are never going to print them large or maximise the potential  36MP resolution anyway.

I took this image saturday night with my D800 its a jpeg quality set to small & size to basic  which

=  a file size of 1.55MB & dimension 2456 x 3680 pixels  this is untouched SOC

The only light was the TV ISO 25,600

And this is after processing in Lightroom

I have not  had to resize them to post here. Click on the original beneath the photo to see them full size .

I'm pretty sure that if I'd used a D600 to take the photo it would have looked the same.

If I'd used my D700 it would have looked worse because it has less dynamic range so the colour fades & the noise because of the larger pixels is much coarser ,I'd have probably converted it to a nice black & white.

Hi 5tve

Yes. I saw this post of yours on your other thread. It's very interesting. Thanks. Well, I guess the decision's really up to me. Hopefully I'll make the most logical one. Thank you for your response. It's very helpful.

caspianm Senior Member • Posts: 2,477
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

I would concentrate on fast lens, vr and good shooting methodology.

The notion that d600 is more forgiving with motion blur is obsurd.

You are getting into full frame, hi mp arena and proper usage of your gears  is what will deliver good result.

Depending on situation, in low light even with proper technics, it is the low contrast that will  degrade your images. I have taken 100's of in/outdoor images with relatively low shuuter(mostly base iso) hand held and have not seen one image gets ruiend by shake. Choose a camera that fits your need based on other parameters.

 caspianm's gear list:caspianm's gear list
Nikon D800E Samsung TL500 Canon PowerShot G1 X Nikon Coolpix B700 Sony a7 +19 more
OP Fathom Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

caspianm wrote:

I would concentrate on fast lens, vr and good shooting methodology.

The notion that d600 is more forgiving with motion blur is obsurd.

You are getting into full frame, hi mp arena and proper usage of your gears  is what will deliver good result.

Depending on situation, in low light even with proper technics, it is the low contrast that will  degrade your images. I have taken 100's of in/outdoor images with relatively low shuuter(mostly base iso) hand held and have not seen one image gets ruiend by shake. Choose a camera that fits your need based on other parameters.

Hi Caspianm

I see. Just curious, what cam are you using? If it's the D800, then you're doing an extraordinary technique in avoiding motion blur on your images! I hope you could provide some tips on how to get optimal images over a cam, of which from what I read from reviews and posts, is susceptible to much blur on images due to the vibration caused by handholding the cam and flicking the shutter.

Thanks for replying. You're comment is noted.

caspianm Senior Member • Posts: 2,477
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

Fathom wrote:

caspianm wrote:

I would concentrate on fast lens, vr and good shooting methodology.

The notion that d600 is more forgiving with motion blur is obsurd.

You are getting into full frame, hi mp arena and proper usage of your gears  is what will deliver good result.

Depending on situation, in low light even with proper technics, it is the low contrast that will  degrade your images. I have taken 100's of in/outdoor images with relatively low shuuter(mostly base iso) hand held and have not seen one image gets ruiend by shake. Choose a camera that fits your need based on other parameters.

Hi Caspianm

I see. Just curious, what cam are you using? If it's the D800, then you're doing an extraordinary technique in avoiding motion blur on your images! I hope you could provide some tips on how to get optimal images over a cam, of which from what I read from reviews and posts, is susceptible to much blur on images due to the vibration caused by handholding the cam and flicking the shutter.

Thanks for replying. You're comment is noted.

Honestly I don't have any special techniques...just hold the cam steady, hold the breath and do not jerk the shutter after focus lock is achieved. There is point for slowest shutter speed/max focal lenght that you should know as well. I would suggest you take a memory card to your local store and shoot a few with both cams and find out for yourself. I shoot with D800e now.

 caspianm's gear list:caspianm's gear list
Nikon D800E Samsung TL500 Canon PowerShot G1 X Nikon Coolpix B700 Sony a7 +19 more
OP Fathom Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

caspianm wrote:

Fathom wrote:

caspianm wrote:

I would concentrate on fast lens, vr and good shooting methodology.

The notion that d600 is more forgiving with motion blur is obsurd.

You are getting into full frame, hi mp arena and proper usage of your gears  is what will deliver good result.

Depending on situation, in low light even with proper technics, it is the low contrast that will  degrade your images. I have taken 100's of in/outdoor images with relatively low shuuter(mostly base iso) hand held and have not seen one image gets ruiend by shake. Choose a camera that fits your need based on other parameters.

Hi Caspianm

I see. Just curious, what cam are you using? If it's the D800, then you're doing an extraordinary technique in avoiding motion blur on your images! I hope you could provide some tips on how to get optimal images over a cam, of which from what I read from reviews and posts, is susceptible to much blur on images due to the vibration caused by handholding the cam and flicking the shutter.

Thanks for replying. You're comment is noted.

Honestly I don't have any special techniques...just hold the cam steady, hold the breath and do not jerk the shutter after focus lock is achieved. There is point for slowest shutter speed/max focal lenght that you should know as well. I would suggest you take a memory card to your local store and shoot a few with both cams and find out for yourself. I shoot with D800e now.

Hi Caspianm

Unfortunately, our country does not offer the liberty for its consumers to test a D800 or D600 without one committing to buy. Thanks for the reminder on the technique as well. Its actually similar to what I do when shooting. And you are fortunate to have a D800E as your cam. The official distributor here only carries the non-E version. Thanks for replying again.

(unknown member) Senior Member • Posts: 2,305
Lots of mis-leading stuff going around
4

The thing about shot discipline is that you need that with any camera.  I use a D800E, and I can tell you that I get better results than I did with a D700 shooting handheld.  If I am sloppy, I get exactly what I got with a D700, garbage.  Your candid snap shots are going to be the same, regardless of pixel count.  You will mess some up, but like with any camera, you will get more right if you just pay attention.  But here's the thing: when you do it right with a D800E you will be astonished.  If you put that thing on a tripod and shoot wildlife you are going to wonder who took those photos because you have never been able to get anything like that before.

All the dire warnings about these new cameras come from 100% pixel peepers.  If you view handheld shots from the D800 and D700 side by side at 100% you are going to think the D700 is much cleaner.  That is only because you don't have enough resolution to see how well or how poorly YOU performed, not the camera.  The D800 will show you the sloppiness viewed at 100%, but notice how little of the full image you see on the screen at that resolution, compared to a D700 or even a D600.  Downsize the D800 image so you are comparing apples to apples, and in all likelihood it will be as good or better.

-- hide signature --

Roy

OP Fathom Junior Member • Posts: 48
Re: Lots of mis-leading stuff going around
1

BackInTheGame wrote:

The thing about shot discipline is that you need that with any camera.  I use a D800E, and I can tell you that I get better results than I did with a D700 shooting handheld.  If I am sloppy, I get exactly what I got with a D700, garbage.  Your candid snap shots are going to be the same, regardless of pixel count.  You will mess some up, but like with any camera, you will get more right if you just pay attention.  But here's the thing: when you do it right with a D800E you will be astonished.  If you put that thing on a tripod and shoot wildlife you are going to wonder who took those photos because you have never been able to get anything like that before.

All the dire warnings about these new cameras come from 100% pixel peepers.  If you view handheld shots from the D800 and D700 side by side at 100% you are going to think the D700 is much cleaner.  That is only because you don't have enough resolution to see how well or how poorly YOU performed, not the camera.  The D800 will show you the sloppiness viewed at 100%, but notice how little of the full image you see on the screen at that resolution, compared to a D700 or even a D600.  Downsize the D800 image so you are comparing apples to apples, and in all likelihood it will be as good or better.

Hi BackInTheGame

Thanks for the tips. It's possible were usimg the same techniques.

(unknown member) Senior Member • Posts: 2,305
Re: Lots of mis-leading stuff going around

Fathom wrote:

BackInTheGame wrote:

The thing about shot discipline is that you need that with any camera.  I use a D800E, and I can tell you that I get better results than I did with a D700 shooting handheld.  If I am sloppy, I get exactly what I got with a D700, garbage.  Your candid snap shots are going to be the same, regardless of pixel count.  You will mess some up, but like with any camera, you will get more right if you just pay attention.  But here's the thing: when you do it right with a D800E you will be astonished.  If you put that thing on a tripod and shoot wildlife you are going to wonder who took those photos because you have never been able to get anything like that before.

All the dire warnings about these new cameras come from 100% pixel peepers.  If you view handheld shots from the D800 and D700 side by side at 100% you are going to think the D700 is much cleaner.  That is only because you don't have enough resolution to see how well or how poorly YOU performed, not the camera.  The D800 will show you the sloppiness viewed at 100%, but notice how little of the full image you see on the screen at that resolution, compared to a D700 or even a D600.  Downsize the D800 image so you are comparing apples to apples, and in all likelihood it will be as good or better.

-- hide signature --

Roy

Hi BackInTheGame

Thanks for the tips. It's possible were usimg the same techniques.

You can accurately compare your results only to yourself, but I think it would be consistent from user to user.  In other words, if your technique is a 4 on a scale of 1 to 10, it should not go up or down with a different camera, unless there is something very uncomfortable about one of them.  The D800 and D700 are the same, to me, other than the AF controls and a few other minor control differences.  I have not used a D600, but I did own a D7000.  Not really that much difference, other than a few ounces.

edit: actually I would have to say the D800E, like the D700, is easier to use than the D7000 primarily because of the huge viewfinder.  However, between the D600 and D800 there should not be a huge difference.

-- hide signature --

Roy

moving_comfort
moving_comfort Veteran Member • Posts: 8,242
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

5tve wrote:

Any camera shake will look worse with the D800 viewing at 100% on your monitor, when you post the image on the web or print them at the same size as the D600  the same amount of camera shake will never look worse.

+1

-- hide signature --

Here are a few of my favorite things...
---> http://www.flickr.com/photos/95095968@N00/sets/72157626171532197/

 moving_comfort's gear list:moving_comfort's gear list
Pentax K20D Nikon D800 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 300mm f/4D ED-IF Nikon AF Nikkor 20mm f/2.8D +10 more
moving_comfort
moving_comfort Veteran Member • Posts: 8,242
He's describing a personal aesthetic as 'more forgiving', and its not, really
3

Fathom wrote:

...

I’ve inquired from Mr. Ming Thein, a famous photography blogger in our region, with regards to the D800′s capturing performance and he said that I’m better off with the D600 as the D800 will require “higher shot discipline” in a reportage scenario (which is synonymous to candid moments I presume).

...

Though I’ve read in other posts that you would still need that higher shot discipline for the D600 because of its 24 MPX resolution. The difference is that the supposed motion blur that could produce in the D600 when shooting handheld is that if it’s “hidden” on the D600, it’s going to be “tiny” on the D800. So, Ming Thein, , still recommends a 1/2X focal length for shutter speed settings to avoid motion blur on the D600 [which is roughly the same as that of the D800, though the conclusion here is that it would be more "forgiving")].

I do like Ming Thein's blog, but I think he's simply wrong in this case.

I suspect he's applying a personal aesthetic here, and describing it generally - as in, "I personally would rather see less resolution, where details are not even present, than see slight motion blur of those same details when viewing at 100%.  The former pleases me more."

There's nothing wrong with having that opinion, but he's describing that personal aesthetic as the lower-res sensor being 'more forgiving', which I think is misleading.

Secondly - there's just not going to be much difference at all either way in that sense between the D600 and D800 If you see motion blur on one, you will on the other as well.

.

-- hide signature --

Here are a few of my favorite things...
---> http://www.flickr.com/photos/95095968@N00/sets/72157626171532197/

 moving_comfort's gear list:moving_comfort's gear list
Pentax K20D Nikon D800 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 300mm f/4D ED-IF Nikon AF Nikkor 20mm f/2.8D +10 more
magneto shot Senior Member • Posts: 1,609
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.

Fathom wrote:

Hi Magneto Shot

Thanks for the response. If money is not a problem, the D4 it is. Sadly, I can only opt for the D800 at the max due to budget constraints.

Hi,

The d800E is slightly better than D800 in lowlight due to the filter.

-- hide signature --

www.marcuslowphotos.com

 magneto shot's gear list:magneto shot's gear list
Sigma DP1x Sigma DP2x Leica X Vario Canon G1 X II Panasonic FZ1000 +12 more
hehbr Junior Member • Posts: 30
Re: Which is better? A Nikon D600 or D800? Mostly using it HANDHELD & with low light.
6

I guess I am at a loss to understand that everything else being equal (technique, etc), the D600 will produce a better image since it has the lesser resolution sensor.  Given that logic, a D700 would be better at 12 MP and a D100 should be even better at 6 MP.

Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads