What is "Clean HDMI out" and why is it important?

Started Sep 11, 2012 | Discussions
Carl Welsby Regular Member • Posts: 172
What is "Clean HDMI out" and why is it important?

Sorry for this newbie question. I'm trying to figure out what camera I should buy (will be doing as much video as stills) and see this mentioned but can't figure out what it is.

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Alpha Jack Senior Member • Posts: 1,539
Re: What is "Clean HDMI out" and why is it important?

Clean HDMI is the ability to feed a live signal from your camera's sensor through the HDMI port without any of the onscreen info you might have displayed in your view finder or LCD back. It also would need to be a non-compressed signal as some cameras do. The purpose is to use an external recorder insteady of your camera's engine.
--
Zeiss taste...Beercan budget!

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OP Carl Welsby Regular Member • Posts: 172
Re: What is "Clean HDMI out" and why is it important?

Many thanks for this, appreciate the time you've taken to reply.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS5 Sony Alpha a99 Sony a99 II Tamron AF 28-75mm F/2.8 XR Di LD Aspherical (IF) Tamron SP AF 200-500mm F/5-6.3 Di LD (IF) +5 more
(unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 3,860
How about HDMI IN?

Alpha Jack wrote:

Clean HDMI is the ability to feed a live signal from your camera's sensor through the HDMI port without any of the onscreen info you might have displayed in your view finder or LCD back. It also would need to be a non-compressed signal as some cameras do. The purpose is to use an external recorder insteady of your camera's engine.

Can you name one single consumer recorder that allows HDMI IN ???

Its an impossible thing because the movie industry has stopped this. I cannot record HDMI programs in all their gloriousness on my own personal DVD recorder in full HDMI quality.

Democracy at its worst.

SirLataxe
SirLataxe Veteran Member • Posts: 3,948
Re: How about HDMI IN?

Ubilam wrote:

Can you name one single consumer recorder that allows HDMI IN ???

Its an impossible thing because the movie industry has stopped this. I cannot record HDMI programs in all their gloriousness on my own personal DVD recorder in full HDMI quality.

Democracy at its worst.

Mr Blam!

Shurely shome mishtake and you meant to say, "Facism at its best" since it is the conspiracy of Big Corp media producers and government to deny the rest of us suckers the freedom to use what we have bought as we wish to use it, in favour of their Vast Profits.

scorrpio
scorrpio Veteran Member • Posts: 3,595
Re: How about HDMI IN?
3

Ubilam wrote:

Can you name one single consumer recorder that allows HDMI IN ???

Its an impossible thing because the movie industry has stopped this. I cannot record HDMI programs in all their gloriousness on my own personal DVD recorder in full HDMI quality.

Democracy at its worst.

Just because your $200 DVD recorder can't take HDMI, does not mean movie industry had anything to do with it. Not to mention the simple fact that DVDs cannot and never will support 'full HDMI' quality. DVD video is 480p at best.

There are plenty of recorders out there, featuring HDMI inouts and able to take in full 1080p signal, but those tend to start in $1000 vicinity. This price again has nothing to do with movie industry, but with the processing muscle required to handle uncompressed 1080p data stream.

Of course, if you run out now and pick up that BlackMagic Studio SSD deck, don't expect to 'record HDMI programs' coming out your cable box or Blu-Ray. That stuff is copy-protected with HDCP, and that would be the doing of TV/movie industry. Yeah, I know, these fascists actually want to get PAID for the content they produced!

Now, if you want to produce your OWN content, nobody in the government, movie industry, or Heavens can block you from filming it with an HD camera sending clean HDMI signal to an HDMI recorder. You just have to pay more $$$ for that gear, just like you have to pay a wee bit more for Canon 1D C than for a Canon PowerShot A800.

-

Anyways, most consumer grade video cameras on the market use HDMI out during recording for monitoring only. Even if there is no overlay info, the resolution is reduced. If you want clean, full-res, uncompressed HDMI output, that's something only available in pro-grade cameras.

(unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 3,860
Re: How about HDMI IN?

SirLataxe wrote:

Ubilam wrote:

Can you name one single consumer recorder that allows HDMI IN ???

Its an impossible thing because the movie industry has stopped this. I cannot record HDMI programs in all their gloriousness on my own personal DVD recorder in full HDMI quality.

Democracy at its worst.

Mr Blam!

Shurely shome mishtake and you meant to say, "Facism at its best" since it is the conspiracy of Big Corp media producers and government to deny the rest of us suckers the freedom to use what we have bought as we wish to use it, in favour of their Vast Profits.

Its sucks either way, Sir Laxative. Vast profits must be maintained afterall and the little guy who wants to record a movie in HD for his own enjoyment, is screwed.

We are all criminals after all, right?

(unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 3,860
Re: How about HDMI IN?

scorrpio wrote:

Ubilam wrote:

Can you name one single consumer recorder that allows HDMI IN ???

Its an impossible thing because the movie industry has stopped this. I cannot record HDMI programs in all their gloriousness on my own personal DVD recorder in full HDMI quality.

Democracy at its worst.

Just because your $200 DVD recorder can't take HDMI, does not mean movie industry had anything to do with it.

Get real!

Its all over the internet the reason why we cannot record HDMI content as true HDMI! The movie industry demanded that consumer recorders cannot do it, and they made the manufacturers tow the line.... still years later.

ryansholl Contributing Member • Posts: 623
Gotta go with this guy on this one.
(unknown member) Veteran Member • Posts: 3,860
Re: Gotta go with this guy on this one.

ryansholl wrote:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-9870317-1.html

They say...

"However, for recording you're pretty much stuck either with "closed box" HD DVRs or utilizing the so-called analog hole: the composite or S-Video output from your DVR, cable, or satellite box will still output an analog video signal--not in high-definition, of course--that's easily recordable.'

You can't record true HDMI because the movie industry said we can't.

scorrpio
scorrpio Veteran Member • Posts: 3,595
Re: How about HDMI IN?
1

Ubilam wrote:

scorrpio wrote:
Get real!

Its all over the internet the reason why we cannot record HDMI content as true HDMI! The movie industry demanded that consumer recorders cannot do it, and they made the manufacturers tow the line.... still years later.

Again, plenty of recorders that can take in HDMI stream and record it. However, no device created to play back commercially produced content will output full-quality signal (or any signal) to a non-HDCP device - specifically to prevent duplication of copy-protected content. And recorders are non-HDCP by definition.

There is no recorder, consumer or otherwise, that you can hook up to a digital cable box or a Blu-Ray player via HDMI and record their output.

However, content CREATION devices - such as cameras - do not require HDCP. So if you want to produce your own HD content, rather than copy it from somewhere, you can by all means do so. Expect to pay around 4-5 grand for a setup capable of handling uncompressed 1080p. (Which is comparable, price-wise, to a Canon 5D3 plus 24-70 f/2.8L II. Not cheap, but definitely within reach of a dedicated enthusiast)

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