Shooting Gun Muzzle Blast Question

Started Aug 25, 2012 | Discussions
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kay4401
kay4401 Regular Member • Posts: 415
Shooting Gun Muzzle Blast Question

Took my D7000 to a shooting range recently. I would have been happy to get a few shots with the shell casing being ejected (and I did get some pics of this), but after the fact, I noticed I had actually captured the muzzle blast in one of the pics. That day, I simply set the camera to its max frame rate, i.e., 6 fps for D7000, and tried to anticipate when the shooter would fire. This pic I got unexpectedly and purely by luck. But, if I was to try and duplicate such a pic intentionally, how would you do it? How would you plan to get such a shot showing the muzzle blast? Any tips?

 kay4401's gear list:kay4401's gear list
Nikon D7000 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8G ED-IF Sigma 50mm F1.4 EX DG HSM Nikon AF-Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D ED Tokina AT-X Pro 11-16mm f/2.8 DX II
Nikon D7000
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NativeTxn Junior Member • Posts: 38
Re: Shooting Gun Muzzle Blast Question

I would think that what you did was probably the best approach. I.e. put the camera at its highest FPS rate and hope for the best.

If you shoot 6 FPS, then each shot takes .1667 seconds. I am not sure exactly how long a muzzle blast lasts, but it is not very long at all. Think about it this way - from the time the firing pin clicks to the time the bullet hits the end of the range is less than one second, so the entire process is probably done before your camera has finished its 6 shots. The muzzle blast is visible for a fraction of a second - that is why with many guns, you don't really even notice it that much with just the naked eye.

If you think about the numbers in the sense of bullet velocity, muzzle blast timing, time from firing pin causing the gun to fire and the bullet hitting the end of the range, etc., then I think that luck likely plays a VERY large role in catching the muzzle blast.

My guess is it is a numbers game - the more times you try, the more likely it will be that you will be able to recreate an image similar to that. But it would not surprise me if it took you multiple trips to the range to catch the same type of shot again.

BTW, REALLY cool picture.

uncleskull Senior Member • Posts: 1,953
sound trigger

Google camera ax. They also have a flickr page of photos.

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unc

~ The only things stopping us from reaching our goals are the limitations we place on ourselves ~

jtan163 Senior Member • Posts: 2,265
Re: Shooting Gun Muzzle Blast Question

NativeTxn wrote:

I would think that what you did was probably the best approach. I.e. put the camera at its highest FPS rate and hope for the best.

If you shoot 6 FPS, then each shot takes .1667 seconds. I am not sure exactly how long a muzzle blast lasts, but it is not very long at all. Think about it this way - from the time the firing pin clicks to the time the bullet hits the end of the range is less than one second, so the entire process is probably done before your camera has finished its 6 shots. The muzzle blast is visible for a fraction of a second - that is why with many guns, you don't really even notice it that much with just the naked eye.

One of those triggers for firing the shutter when lightning strikes.

I'm not sure if it would work or not, but i guess you could email a manufacturer and ask.

Another option (depending on the range) is turn off the lights, open the shutter, have the shooter shoot(the gun), close the shutter, turn on the light.

Actually if you have the camera on a tripod you might be able to do it with the light on.

 jtan163's gear list:jtan163's gear list
Nikon D750 Nikon D4 Olympus OM-D E-M5 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR +7 more
Larold Contributing Member • Posts: 752
Re: Shooting Gun Muzzle Blast Question

I haven't tried this, but if you are the shooter and the photographer, you could rig up a footswitch...like from a guitar pedal...a simple thing, and step on it when you pull the trigger. Or even put your toe on the infrared remote trigger...

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Larold

XLTimbo
XLTimbo Contributing Member • Posts: 916
Similar result

I took my girlfriend to the range for the first time and wanted to get some pictures for her. I took my small compact camera and was pretty stoked to get this shot.

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 XLTimbo's gear list:XLTimbo's gear list
Canon PowerShot S95 Nikon D7000 Nikon D800 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm F1.8G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +12 more
stuntmonkey
stuntmonkey Senior Member • Posts: 2,696
Try this Rig

This might be too slow, but it's an interesting DIY project that looks achievable.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j00azq8THKY

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