Video with x-pro

Started May 9, 2012 | Discussions
stopshoot Regular Member • Posts: 221
Video with x-pro

Has anyone shot any video with the x-Pro and if so any good? Can you shoot at 24 fps at full 1920x1080 hd? What is the mic like? Can you plug in an external mic?

Cheers
vic

teohyc Regular Member • Posts: 363
Re: Video with x-pro

You can check out some videos here:

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA924A967C36AB083&feature=mh_lolz

AF doesn't seem to be very accurate during video.
And Manual focus is not easy.
So basically shooting video is a huge challenge.

If I want to shoot video, I will not be bringing this camera out.

 teohyc's gear list:teohyc's gear list
Panasonic 12-35mm F2.8 Voigtlander Nokton 17.5mm F0.95 Aspherical Fujifilm XF 23mm F1.4 R
snapper1967 Contributing Member • Posts: 673
Re: Video with x-pro

stopshoot wrote:

Has anyone shot any video with the x-Pro and if so any good? Can you shoot at 24 fps at full 1920x1080 hd? What is the mic like? Can you plug in an external mic?

Forget video. My iPhone 4 does a better job. Not sure why fuji wasted time putting it on this camera!

Cheers
vic

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Just enjoy what you do.

Reybabes
Reybabes Senior Member • Posts: 1,625
Re: Video with x-pro

I agree with the above sentiments. I'm using the XP1 (and an OMD EM5 at the same time) and it's like comparing an iPad with a stack of post-it notes. If video's your thing, look elsewhere.

The video on the Fuji is serviceable, but it seems to be more of an afterthought than anything else.

The OMD on the other hand... pretty darn nice.

Rey
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The best things in life aren't things...
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OP stopshoot Regular Member • Posts: 221
Re: Video with x-pro

Ummm ... sort of what I expected which is a real shame.

It maybe be able to produce great stills - with some skill and a little luck it would seem - but I think it is a real shame that Fuji didn't learn from the X100. If they had produced a camera with quick and accurate auto focus or either a full manual digital camera aka a cheap Leica (Leica cameras by the way I love - use to have an old M8) then I think they would have got a slam dunk. From what I'm reading and the quick in-my hand tests I did with stills (I didn't get chance to play with video hence asking the original question) it was just too much of a pain - now before anyone jumps on me this is purely my opinion and let me say I was really disappointed as I really was hoping this camera was going to get it right.

Still, it's got a great sensor so please Fuji for the x-pro2 sort out the focus issues (either ditch the video or provide full manual control and an external mic socket, audio controls etc) and deliver a camera that is 'all round' great!

Just my 2 cents (well 2 old English pence to be exact)

lnbolch
lnbolch Senior Member • Posts: 2,311
Re: Video with x-pro

LiveView has been around since the beginning. My first camera bought a dozen years ago had it. Any camera with LiveView has a video feed—and that includes most cameras now. No camera manufacturer now or in the future, can afford to leave video off. In essence it is a free feature that is now expected. That does not mean it is a video camera.

I have tried a few clips with the X100, and viewed on a big screen, they were impressive, even though 720p. I had no problem opening them in Sony Vegas movie editing software, and editing them. In one case, the ambient sound level was high and I was able to greatly clarify speaking voices on the sound-track using the tools in SoundForge. The same would be fully true of my X-Pro1, though I have not yet tested it.

Would I actually use either camera to make video? No way! They—and most still cameras—while capable of capturing it, are simply not designed for it. A few like the Canon 5D have loads of aftermarket gear that can turn it into a decent video camera, but at considerable cost. While pro-video cameras can be enormously costly, they start at quite affordable prices. Even a low-end camera will be much more comfortable than trying to use a still camera for video. What they can not do, is produce a "film" look, which can be done with a larger sensor and large aperture lens. However, this requires a cinematographer's skill-level that is not trivial.

Any camera can shoot anything. However, it does not mean it can do it well. If I were making my living shooting field sports, I would choose a D4 over my X100. If I were shooting video and not required by the editor to also provide stills, I would shoot an actual video camera. Cameras are made in so many ways, in order to do somethings better than others and thus be competitive. The Fujifilm cameras are superb for people, street and any decisive moment photography. Both are extremely stealthy and with skill provide good results in low light. However, if you want ultimate versatility, go for a dSLR. The trade-off is bulk, weight and noise—the direct opposite of stealth.

It has been said that with enormous dedication you can teach a pig to sing. However in the process, the pig undergoes cruel stress and in the end, the result does not justify the effort. So it is with cameras too.

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Fujifilm FinePix Real 3D W1 Fujifilm FinePix X100 Nikon D700 Fujifilm X-Pro1 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED +8 more
[so]hai® New Member • Posts: 10
Re: Video with x-pro

Actually i just took a video of my newborn daughter using X-Pro1, and satisfied with the quality but auto focus seems On & Off, manual focus might be a better option for this kind of subject. Thanks!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QLHAJS0M04

lnbolch
lnbolch Senior Member • Posts: 2,311
Re: Video with x-pro

[so]hai® wrote:

Actually i just took a video of my newborn daughter using X-Pro1, and satisfied with the quality but auto focus seems On & Off, manual focus might be a better option for this kind of subject. Thanks!

It is the nature of auto-focus to seek and constantly compensate—fine with stills but disturbing with movies. Actual TV/movie cameras use a large knob geared to the focusing ring, with a white disk where focus points can be marked. If the focus must be changed during a take, a person called the focus-puller manually turns it using those marks.

The same is true of exposure, which is also disturbing to watch if the aperture is opening and closing if there is movement in the frame, say a dark clad actor moving through an otherwise light set. AE tries to compensate, causing the depth of field to change and the overall picture to become lighter or darker.

Movies are easy to shoot, but very difficult to shoot well.

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Fujifilm FinePix Real 3D W1 Fujifilm FinePix X100 Nikon D700 Fujifilm X-Pro1 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED +8 more
hellocrowley Senior Member • Posts: 1,287
Re: Video with x-pro

Here's a video of a low volume event I shot. Manual focus was a pain and I had no control over exposure, but it came out ok, I guess. I remember reading somewhere that slow sensor readout leads to higher image quality, but crappy video/EVF quality.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbGwhzMzhrg&feature=plcp

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