Epson R-2000 Printer FYI

Started Mar 24, 2012 | Discussions
Mr. Cool Contributing Member • Posts: 503
Epson R-2000 Printer FYI

I have had my R-2000 for about a month and I couldn't be happier with the prints. The set up was a breeze even with someone like me. Did I calibrate my monitor? Yes and No. I did not use any equipment to calibrate the monitor. I just downloaded 3 different color charts from the internet. I made a straight print from these charts using Epson and Red River papers with their canned profiles. From there I adjusted the brightness and contrast on my Dell 2210 monitor untill it looked as close as I could get it to the downloaded charts. I ended up with 56% and 57% reduction of my monitor brightness and contrast. I do not get the dark prints that many complain about. In fact I do not run any test prints at all even when printing 13 X 19 inch prints. My prints look exactly like my monitor. Even the gray scale prints like the downloaded files, with no color cast at all. I was surprised by this because many have said that the R-2000 would print B & W prints with a slight color cast. Not so on my printer. This may not be the way to calibrate my equipment and may not fly with all the experts that say I need to buy the equipment to calibrate my monitor. But it works for me. Am I an expert on the art of color printing? NO, but I have been making color prints for over 60 years starting with the Color Carbo prints back in the very early 1951s. I do know what to look for in a color print. Back then it could take maybe two days to make a color print having to make color separations and such. Some of the Carbro prints are still good to day after storage in the attic for the past 60 years.

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Tom-C Senior Member • Posts: 1,386
Re: Epson R-2000 Printer FYI

Your post sure brings back memories.

I tried color printing in my darkroom in the early 60s, about a decade after you started. I think it was a color chemistry and paper kit from FR.

Anyway I couldn't keep temperatures exact enough for any kind of consistency. So I spent a lot of time and money doing test prints and making adjustments trying to follow a moving target.

I gave up pretty quickly and stuck with black and white in the darkroom.

These days I don't do test strips or test prints. I just send it to the printer and expect it to come out the way I want.

Good old days? Not for amateur color printing in the darkroom.

Tom

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Simon Garrett Veteran Member • Posts: 7,377
Re: Epson R-2000 Printer FYI

If your method works for you then that's fine.

If I understood you correctly, you are colour-managing your printer (using profiles, and colour-managed software) but not the monitor. You didn't say, but I guess you know that you have to make sure printer colour management is done either in the software you use to print, or the driver, but not both. With Epson printers, even if you colour-manage in the program, you still have to turn on colour-management in the driver, but tell it that the program is doing it. The printer setting looks something like this:

Provided you've done that OK, and your printer software is properly taking account of image colour space, then prints will be right.

The monitor won't be quite right, even with the settings you've done, as the Dell 2210 colour space isn't exactly sRGB and almost certainly won't exactly match your images.

This may not be the way to calibrate my equipment and may not fly with all the experts that say I need to buy the equipment to calibrate my monitor. But it works for me.

Personally I don't think colour management is just for "experts". For the sake of $150 to buy a Spyder or ColorMunki, it would take much less time to set up you monitor than to do all the tests you described!
--
Simon

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OP Mr. Cool Contributing Member • Posts: 503
Re: Epson R-2000 Printer FYI

Simon: My print certainly do exactly match my monitor. I had a R-1800 that I adjusted the same way and those prints all perfectly matched the monitor. I doubt if you could make a profile with your equipment that would match any better. My system took less then 15 minutes to get a matched print. I would question your coment about my prints would certainly not match my monitor. You mispoke in your coment as you could not know what they would look like unless you were here when the prints were made.Any way the Epson R-2000 is a great printer and if you can turn out a print as good or better then the R-2000 then more power to you. End of discusiuon.

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VirtualMirage
VirtualMirage Veteran Member • Posts: 3,956
Re: Epson R-2000 Printer FYI

I guess if it works for you, it works for you. Most people strive to have their prints match their monitor whereas you decided to do the opposite and had your monitor match your prints.

This probably works fine providing that your primary purpose of your computer and monitor is to edit photos for print and print alone. Also this should work so long as you are using one type of paper or a few types whose profiles are close to each other in make up.

But for someone who might be using their computer and monitor for multiple purposes or need to have color accuracy for web output or screen only display, the images then might not turn out as well as they would for print. In other words, you specialized your monitor for a specific tasking that might fall short in other areas.

I've got an Epson R2000 that I picked up in February after my 1400 bit the dust. I will agree that it puts out amazing prints, especially on the Red River paper with their profiles (I'm using their Polar Luster and Polar Pearl Metallic at the moment). My monitor is calibrated via a Spyder3Pro calibration tool and the Spyder Elite 4.0 software. My first prints came out pretty much spot on to what I see on my wide gamut HP LP2475w monitor.

I think the biggest issue people have about prints that are too dark are from having multiple print profiles stacked when printing, thus the recommendation to turn ICM off if using printer profiles and letting Lightroom or whatever you are using handle the print profiles. I'd be curious to know if you were turning ICM off when you were using the printer profiles to calibrate your display.

At the end of the day, so long your prints are coming out the way you want and you are enjoying what you are doing, that is all that matters. I just received some 13x19 paper from my recent order from Red River that I can't wait to use.

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Paul

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OP Mr. Cool Contributing Member • Posts: 503
Re: Epson R-2000 Printer FYI

You are right. I download a color and B&W gray scale from the web.Then I adjust my monitor to match that print Works for me just fine. I only have one purpose for my printer and that is to make a great print. I am 84 years old and I have to answer only to my self and I am a very hard task master. I do not have tp print for the web or try to match colors for a fashion shoot or anything like that. I print only for my self. I do not have to make money with my photography. I have spent most of my life as a photographer. Having started in the jungles of Luzon making prints for my fellow GIs. After the war I was a Flight Test Photographer for the Boeing Company. This was a very demanding job as sometimes we would have as many as 23 cameras on board the flight Test plane beside flying in a chase plane shooting movies or stills. 18 years on this job. I then traveled for about ten years as a Photographic Tech. Rep traveling around the country where ever someone had photographic problems. The last 17 years I spent as a Medical Photographer for a Major Medical University. So you see I have been involved in Photography for over seventy years. I know what a good print should look like be it color or B&W.

In answer to your question yes I do have the color management turned off and I let Photoshop do its thing. I use only Red River, Epson, or Inkjetart papers With their canned profiles.. Most often I print 13" X 19" size prints. I am thinking about going to a refill cartridge and ink system. Have not made up my mind on this yet.

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jtoolman
jtoolman Veteran Member • Posts: 6,815
Re: Epson R-2000 Printer FYI

Check out Precission Colors on EBAY. A Canadian 3rd Part ink company that sells Image Specialists inks, which are some of the best.

I have the R2000 along with just about every other Canon and Epson 13 to 17 inch printer and I get fantastic results with Precission Colors inks.

You can get the R2000 pre filled carts and a set of inks and you will be very happy, specially since you will likely not have to make any adjustments to the printing flow you are using. I used you very method for years before I dicided to learn about producing my own ICC profiles with the Color Munki to calibrate my monitor.
Keep it up and enjoy your photography.

My story parallels your except it started in the early 60s. I was an Army photographer for 21 yearsw begining in 1968 in Viet Nam.

Simon Garrett Veteran Member • Posts: 7,377
Re: Epson R-2000 Printer FYI

Mr. Cool wrote:

I would question your coment about my prints would certainly not match my monitor. You mispoke in your coment as you could not know what they would look like unless you were here when the prints were made.

I wasn't questioning that you get great prints. Let me explain my comment.

You explained that you alter the brightness and contrast of your monitor. However, if you calibrate/profile with a hardware device, you also measure the colour space of the device. This measures the R, G and B primary colours of the monitor. I can't find a measurement for the Dell 2210, but other similar Dell monitors are approximately sRGB colour space, but not exactly. I've not come across any monitor that matches exactly sRGB colour space (or any other standard colour space).

In order to get accurate colours on a monitor across the tonal range, the software displaying the image needs to map colours to the monitor's colour space from the image colour space (which might be sRGB, Adobe RGB or whatever - but won't be the monitor's colour space). For that you need a monitor profile containing colour space information.

Hence my comment - let's call it a prediction - that without a calibrated and profiled monitor as well as profiles for the printer (and colour-managed software) print colours are unlikely to match monitor colours exactly right across the colour range. However, many monitors are fairly close to sRGB, so the errors may be fairly small.

Any way the Epson R-2000 is a great printer and if you can turn out a print as good or better then the R-2000 then more power to you. End of discusiuon.

I'm glad to hear it! My R1800 has just packed up, and I've ordered a R2000.
--
Simon

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OP Mr. Cool Contributing Member • Posts: 503
Re: Epson R-2000 Printer FYI

Thanks jtoolman, I will check it out.

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