3880 vs. 2400

Started Feb 3, 2012 | Discussions
JerryG1 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,232
3880 vs. 2400

When I bought my Epson R2400 I had also considered the 3800. I decided in favor of the smaller printer because of price and the cost of cartridges. Now, several years later, I am reconsidering that. The 3880 is selling at a discounted price, and there is a $300 rebate from Epson in effect throughout February. I can get the 3880 for a net $850 (less whatever I get for my 2400). Seems like a good deal.

I'm asking those of you familiar with both printers if you personally see a difference in print quality between the two. I know the 3880 is a 17" printer, and the cost/ml of ink is less on the bigger machine. But I'm interested in your perception of print quality, and also of general usability between the two.

The 3880 has the newer vivid-magenta ink set-- do you see differences in gamut or anything else from that? Do you see more detail in the 3880 output? What about clogging tenedency?

Just looking for possible justifications to get the newer machine. I don't expect to print larger than 12x18 inches very often, and I don't print enough for lowered ink costs to justify the purchase. Should I dive in or walk away?
--
JerryG

My galleries at:
http://www.pbase.com/jerryg1

stormyboy Senior Member • Posts: 1,022
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

Maybe look at the R3000?

jtoolman
jtoolman Veteran Member • Posts: 6,815
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

Or a R2880 which can still be found. Same ink set and great output.
But yes the R3000 would be a great choice as well.

OP JerryG1 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,232
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

Thanks for the suggestions stormyboy and jtoolman, but at this point I'm looking for a direct comparison in print quality between the 2400 and 3880.

I considered the R3000, but since the 3880 is so close in price right now I'd like to have 17" capability for the occasional exhibition print. I did notice that the 3000 has smaller droplet size and higher resolution than the 3880, and I wondeedr if that translates into visible print differences.
--
JerryG

My galleries at:
http://www.pbase.com/jerryg1

irvweiner Contributing Member • Posts: 705
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

Buy the 3880 a superb NOW printer and dont look back, the 2400 is long in the tooth.

Justifications:: Spend some quality time reading the myriad of posts.on this site raving and praising the 3880--the 2880 and the 3000 are darn good, both using the same Vivid inkset. The new 'teflonized' printheads have drastically reduced head clogging as you will read. IQ diffs between these 3 (ignoring your 2400) printers is rated trivial--you will see what you want to imagine and that will change with the temperature, humidity and your mood. Concentrate on your workflow and you will create superb prints on any of these printers. For more superb reads and comments go to: Inkjet Printer Forum on nifty-stuff.com

I have been using the 3880 for > 18 mos. creating Color and B&W prints--I swear the B&W comes out of the printer smelling of hypo!! Mid-summer I ventured into printing on Canvas with great success--my first 2 B&W's were awarded 1st & 2nd in my clubs monthly competition. The 1st print went on to win best of the year, I bring this up not brag but to segue into the surprise I encountered when club members asked me: "Who did your printing?" I was embarrassed to state these were my first attempts on the 3880 with canvas.

Bottom line: choosing the robustly built 3880 gives you several advantages from the start:

1: Max print size is 17x34.7, no fuss doing 4x6 either. Perfect for panos and big pix!

2: Reliable hi quality refillable inks & carts are available--an 80 ml refill will cost you $9 not $50. My 2nd place print was printed with the inkjetcarts.us refill system when I used up my OEM carts and switched over. I bought the 3880 and the refill system together--this pre-planned cost reduction permits me to make many more prints without cringing about the egregious cost of OEM inks. Refillable inks and carts are also available for the 2880 &3000 from the same vendor and a very few others, search my posts here.

3: You qualify for the Pro level customer service--my few initial contacts were fruitful.

If you take the effort to review the 3880 posts, you will find that 99 44/100% of your questions have been discussed in detail. I'm also aware that the $300 rebate has been extended for this this month--Adorama offers free shpg!

Enjoy irv weiner

jtoolman
jtoolman Veteran Member • Posts: 6,815
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

I have both the R2400 and the PRO3800, and though it is not the PRO 3880, the 3800s output is beautiful nonetheless. The R2400 uses the same K3 inkset as the PRO3800 and in identical situations I really cannot detect much diference between the two. I can probably compare the PRO 3800 and my R2880 which uses the Vivid Magenta inkset and see whether at least the VM ink set does a better job comapred to the K3 of the R2400. That would be a better comparison as a PRO 3880 analog.

I would expect to not see a major diference except maybe in the blues and purples renditions where the VM inks are supposed to excel in.

I love all my 13" printers but my larger 17" PRO 3800s due to the 80 ml carts, which I am running OEM on one and Image Specialist inks and refillable carts on the second one put them in their own much superior level.

The 17" width and larger tanks are great to have!!! Seems like you can print for ever.

OP JerryG1 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,232
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

jtoolman wrote:

... I can probably compare the PRO 3800 and my R2880 which uses the Vivid Magenta inkset and see whether at least the VM ink set does a better job comapred to the K3 of the R2400. That would be a better comparison as a PRO 3880 analog.

I would expect to not see a major diference except maybe in the blues and purples renditions where the VM inks are supposed to excel in.

What got me rethinking my printer situation is the picture below of a fluorescent blue flower. I needed a print of it for a local library exhibition. On my calibrated monitor the image looks fairly as I remember the flower, but the print was awful--a dull flat blue. CS5s gamut warning shows the entire flower to be out of gamut

In a stroke of inspiration this morning I realized I could soft proof this image for the 3880 just by downlading the 3880 profile for Ilford's Galerie Gold Fibre Silk. I did that, and saw a huge difference in the flower color beween the soft proofs of the 3880 and the 2400! I would not say the 3800 nailed the color, but it was very much closer. Pretty much convinced myself to go with this newer inkset, and probably the 3880!

...

The 17" width and larger tanks are great to have!!! Seems like you can print for ever.

But can you?

I mean Epson says the ink lifetime is six-months after opening. I think those 80 ml cartridges are a 1-2 year supply for me. One of my concerns with the 3880 is throwing away ink because it might get old and cloggy.

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JerryG

My galleries at:
http://www.pbase.com/jerryg1

OP JerryG1 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,232
Re: 3880 vs. 2400 n/t

accidental post.

OP JerryG1 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,232
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

irvweiner wrote:

Buy the 3880 a superb NOW printer and dont look back, the 2400 is long in the tooth.
...
Enjoy irv weiner

Thanks, I appreciate your upbeat encoragement, Irv. Right now the biggest obstacle to pushing the buy button (on Sunday) is my concern that I don't print enough to use up those big cartridges in six months, and I don't want to mung up my printer with old gooey ink.

See my response to jtoolman below.

-- hide signature --

JerryG

My galleries at:
http://www.pbase.com/jerryg1

Howard Moftich Veteran Member • Posts: 9,986
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

Please read any number of previous posts regarding the 6 month ink lifetime. It's simply not an issue in the real world and I tell you this as a 3800 owner. Many of us are using 1, 1.5 and 2 year old ink and it just doesn't make a difference.

OP JerryG1 Veteran Member • Posts: 3,232
Ink Lifetime

Howard Moftich wrote:

Please read any number of previous posts regarding the 6 month ink lifetime. It's simply not an issue in the real world and I tell you this as a 3800 owner. Many of us are using 1, 1.5 and 2 year old ink and it just doesn't make a difference.

I have read such things, but my own experience with the 2400 is very different. I notice a definite increase in the frequency and stubborness of clogs when a cartridge has been installed for about a year. I know the 2400 is not the 3800, but on the issue of ink stability I would expect more similarities than differences.
--
JerryG

My galleries at:
http://www.pbase.com/jerryg1

jtoolman
jtoolman Veteran Member • Posts: 6,815
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

I have not experienced ANY problem with using inks past Epson's so called exiration date.

I've had OEM carts that are well over a year or more past the exp date currently running on some of my 15 printers with ZERO problem. Even if you take two years to use up the ink on the PRO 3880 you should OK.

Every several months you can remove each cart and give each one a GENTLE swish to resuspend the pigment particles.

Good luck

Phil Hill Senior Member • Posts: 2,757
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

jtoolman wrote:

Every several months you can remove each cart and give each one a GENTLE swish to resuspend the pigment particles.

Yes, this is important for printers that don't move the cartridges with the print head. I've been doing that at approximately 3-month intervals with my R3000, although I give them the same type of shake that Epson recommends for new cartridges. With my R1900 it's not been necessary because they travel with the print head and are shaken by the printer itself.

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David Clarke29 Contributing Member • Posts: 787
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

JerryG1 wrote:

Thanks for the suggestions stormyboy and jtoolman, but at this point I'm looking for a direct comparison in print quality between the 2400 and 3880.

I considered the R3000, but since the 3880 is so close in price right now I'd like to have 17" capability for the occasional exhibition print. I did notice that the 3000 has smaller droplet size and higher resolution than the 3880, and I wondeedr if that translates into visible print differences.
--
JerryG

My galleries at:
http://www.pbase.com/jerryg1

I may be mistaken but I don't think that the R3000 has a removable waste ink tray. If it gets heavy use for a year or two how do you get rid of the accumulated waste?

Dave. (UK)

jtoolman
jtoolman Veteran Member • Posts: 6,815
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

You install an external bottle for the waste ink to collect.

The right side panel was to be removed to access the waste ink tubes which need to be spliced to longer tubing so it can be routed out side the printer to the new waste ink bottle.

I don't know of any tool to reset the counter for the R3000 as of yet.

Maybe the WIC reset tool will come up with a reset for this printer. I think they only go up to the R2880.

ZoranC Veteran Member • Posts: 5,569
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

irvweiner wrote:

Bottom line: choosing the robustly built 3880 gives you several advantages from the start: ...

irv, litlle bit off topic while still on topic, after discussions with you and others I have went for 3880, it should be arriving tomorrow, I want to thank you and all others that helped.

David Clarke29 Contributing Member • Posts: 787
Re: 3880 vs. 2400

jtoolman wrote:

You install an external bottle for the waste ink to collect.

The right side panel was to be removed to access the waste ink tubes which need to be spliced to longer tubing so it can be routed out side the printer to the new waste ink bottle.

I don't know of any tool to reset the counter for the R3000 as of yet.

Maybe the WIC reset tool will come up with a reset for this printer. I think they only go up to the R2880.

Hmmm.. It seems that the way that Epson promote the printer, especially its ink cartridge size, they would have provided a proper system for waste ink removal instead of a DIY re-design. In fairly regular/heavy use I can imagine problems after about eighteen months or so - possibly a new model out by that time and of course out of warranty. While the DIY system would no doubt work very well, that also would negate any warranty.

The printer gives superb photographic output and I suppose Epson do not wish it to impinge on sales of their higher end models by slightly reducing its design parameters.

Dave. (UK)

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