Ricoh G700 short review

Started Dec 14, 2011 | Discussions
schaki Senior Member • Posts: 2,306
Ricoh G700 short review

Short review of the Ricoh G700. Firmware used for most of the time have been 1.12 and 1.09 before that.

I've had the G700 for some months now but are not using it much anymore. While the size is smaller I find that I like the faster aperture and lower NR in the Ricoh Caplio 500SE better. The G700 of course have a clear edge for video recording in HD but unfortunately these are being smudged partly as can be seen in my video wiht the copper snake on Youtube so I'm not that enthusiastic over that feature after all. Having thought I might find it more useful.

Having the lens placed so darned near the rounded grip is not optimally. The water is cold at this time of the year and it is harder to dip the camera down into the water ertically and keep the fingers from freezing. I don't have that problem with the 500SE or 400G wide which have the lens more on the left side of the body.

It is also easy to get a finger in the way when using gloves which can be seen in one of against the light pictures which I've taken vertically. Definitely not optimally during the winter and I may expect Ricoh to make a design-change for the G800.

An other feature which probably could be introduced already now if Ricoh would like is so that the camera go into hibernate for long interval-shooting. Thus one wouldn't have to keep the camera wired for long intervals.

Other changes may be the way half-pressing the shutter for video-recording works. Now it stops the the recording instead for refocus. My advice would be to alter that and let the 'OK' button stop the recording instead or simply just full-press the shutter release-button.

Regarding image quality I think it basically is the grey noise which makes the picture look more dull than these in fact would. It shouldn't be impossibly to add the option noise reduction off which are available in the Ricoh CX. Hence there would be possible to save more fine-details.

That is just some more or less needed improvements for the Ricoh G700 and G700SE. There are certainly more that I've not thought of at the moment while this is being written.

Pros

  • Improved metering compared to older models.

  • Elegant handling and what might be the best user interface among these rugged and waterproof compacts.

  • Good lcd which tolerates narrow viewing angles.

  • Useful ADJ-button means fast access to exposure compensation, iso and AF-modes etc. It is possible to customize the ADJ-button - Add and remove up to four-menu settings which may be useful.

  • Snapfocus

  • Focuses marginally faster than the G600 but still slower than the 500G/SE

Cons:

  • Auto-iso reaches one stop too far and it can't be changed. From Iso 64-400.

  • HD 1080P is nice but creates huge-files and some minor smudging of noise and details.

  • No possibility to use optical zoom (only digital) or refocus during a movie-recording. Half pressing the shutter stops the movie recording instead for allowing to refocus. Doh! And there is no focus tracking either.

  • Not real image stabilization but some software-fix which contributes to ruin details - Better leave it turned off.

  • Noise reduction are marginally heavier than for previous model, the G600. More artifacts but still not way too badly unlike some competitors which figured in this years group-test here on Dpreview.

  • Macro only available at 33mm or longer focal-lengths.

  • setting the flash to Flash 10m also raises the iso to 1600 without inform the user about that. It is claimed in the manual but first on page 64 and not on page 31 which is about "using the flash".

So, an unpleasant surprise waits around the corner the first time using that flash-setting and you'll probably never use that setting again once you have seen the result on a TFT screen. The G600 had that feature too.

  • Poorly buffered with "Edit detection" turned on means that one get stuck with a delay of seven seconds between each picture. The way around this is to set continues mode to ON and you won't have to wait until next picture can be taken.

Some sample images. Full size can be downloaded from my gallery.

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Canon PowerShot G7 Ricoh Caplio 500SE Ricoh G600 Ricoh G700SE
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Prognathous Veteran Member • Posts: 9,151
Re: Ricoh G700 short review

Interesting comments, but on a camera that probably not many are considering to purchase.

I'm curious - wouldn't you be better off with a less-robust but otherwise-more-capable small-sensor camera for these kind of pictures?

Prog.
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OP schaki Senior Member • Posts: 2,306
Re: Ricoh G700 short review

Prognathous wrote:

Interesting comments, but on a camera that probably not many are considering to purchase.

Yes - I can see that not many are going to buy this camera. I don't think that the previous model, G600 sold ery well either. It is a little pricey compared to the competition but industries which it is aimed towards can probably afford to pay for it if them need the rugged design or some of the features. Just kind of stupid that Gps not is built in on a camera like this one.

I'm curious - wouldn't you be better off with a less-robust but otherwise-more-capable small-sensor camera for these kind of pictures?

You mean something like a GX100 with marginally bigger ccd and more manual control?

I kind of like these industrial designs. The first one I bought, the 400G wide which still is my favorite, was primarily aimed for some simple underwater pictures.

I've had a look at recent advanced cameras Like Samsung, EX1 and Olympus XZ1 etc. the problem with most of these cameras are the NR which I find too aggressive for me as a jpeg-shooter. The Coolpix P7000 have low NR which even can be backed off but the camera is rather big I think. Fuji X10 seem to have quite some NR enabled as default but at least it can be backed off according to the pdf manual. Though I don't know how much that helps.

I don know how the Canon S100 are. I'll probably await some reviews worth to read about it.

For now I've a GRDI when I want some manual control and control the dof in macro. I read that the GX8 only had three aperture-values to choose between and that is rather limiting when it comes to dof in macro. I would be better off add a GX100 which as complement to the GRDI in the meantime until something better with low NR shows up.

I think that Samsung NX100 or NX200 with the 20mm 2.8 pancake seems to be the best option among the mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses, would I like to have some carry anywhere with big sensor. The 20mm 2.8 equals 30mm and can close-focus down to 17mm which actually is a marginally better than my current Sigma 24mm 2.8 super-wide II for Nikon F-mount. The Sigma 24mm SW2 are well regarded lens and optically beat its direct competing offerings from Nikon, Pentax, Minolta/Sony and probably Canon and Olympus also.

That lens is nothing like much other trash fro Sigma. True quality optically speaking which stand up well compared to my other manual-focus high quality Nikon-lenses.

The NX 20mm 2.8 pancake is not quite up to that standard but would serve me well enough if I decide to take that route to have another quality-compact carry anywhere as complement to my existing ones. Having only a fixed focal-length to work with is not going to scare me off, otherwise I wouldn't have bought a GRDI in the very first place.

While the GXR mount-module is tempting I can't say the same about the GXR A12 28mm. For two reasons. I've no interest in some lensor which is going to collect sensor-dust over time and probably can't be cleaned easy or safely by the user alone - Would probably need to send it in. Not either would I or anyone else benefit with better dynamic range or high iso by simply buying a GXRII body once it is released. Insted I'll most likely have to pay for the same glass twice and buy An A16 28mm or whatever sensor an upgraded module might use.

Ricoh better make their very own AF mount with very short flange-distance - That is going to make more sense for some long term than lensors.

Sony have also got it wrong with their huge-lenses. Just look at the pancake... and the zooms are no better.

m4/3 2x multiplier and worse dynamic range and high iso than the competitors is another no no for me.

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Prognathous Veteran Member • Posts: 9,151
Re: Ricoh G700 short review

schaki wrote:

You mean something like a GX100 with marginally bigger ccd and more manual control?

Yes, or if we're talking about current models - something like the GXR/S10.

I've had a look at recent advanced cameras Like Samsung, EX1 and Olympus XZ1 etc. the problem with most of these cameras are the NR which I find too aggressive for me as a jpeg-shooter.

NR or not, all the cameras you mentioned still beat the G700 handily when it comes to IQ, don't you think?

For now I've a GRDI when I want some manual control and control the dof in macro. I read that the GX8 only had three aperture-values to choose between and that is rather limiting when it comes to dof in macro.

The GX8 does have only three aperture values - wide open, too small to be useful (diffraction-wise), and something in between. Do you really need more fine grained control in a small-sensor camera?

I would be better off add a GX100 which as complement to the GRDI in the meantime until something better with low NR shows up.

If you mostly use low-ISO, the GX200 would be a better choice for numerous reasons which I listed in the past.

I think that Samsung NX100 or NX200 with the 20mm 2.8 pancake seems to be the best option among the mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses, would I like to have some carry anywhere with big sensor. The 20mm 2.8 equals 30mm and can close-focus down to 17mm which actually is a marginally better than my current Sigma 24mm 2.8 super-wide II for Nikon F-mount.

What's the use of focusing so close when the lens casts a shadow on the subject? Good macro at the tele-end (Ricoh's forte) is IMHO much more useful.

While the GXR mount-module is tempting I can't say the same about the GXR A12 28mm. For two reasons. I've no interest in some lensor which is going to collect sensor-dust over time and probably can't be cleaned easy or safely by the user alone - Would probably need to send it in. Not either would I or anyone else benefit with better dynamic range or high iso by simply buying a GXRII body once it is released.

I don't find the APS-C lensors very tempting, for the very same reasons.

Ricoh better make their very own AF mount with very short flange-distance - That is going to make more sense for some long term than lensors.

Why design a new mounts when they can join someone else's? Sony's NEX E-Mount specifically has all that they need - open specifications, AF, AE, very short flange-distance.

Prog.
--
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OP schaki Senior Member • Posts: 2,306
Re: Ricoh G700 short review

Prognathous wrote:

schaki wrote:

I've had a look at recent advanced cameras Like Samsung, EX1 and Olympus XZ1 etc. the problem with most of these cameras are the NR which I find too aggressive for me as a jpeg-shooter.

NR or not, all the cameras you mentioned still beat the G700 handily when it comes to IQ, don't you think?

I merely bought the G700 for testing-purpose only. Not having seen any other full-size samples online other than these on Ricohs site which not tell a lot about what it is up to.

For now I've a GRDI when I want some manual control and control the dof in macro. I read that the GX8 only had three aperture-values to choose between and that is rather limiting when it comes to dof in macro.

The GX8 does have only three aperture values - wide open, too small to be useful (diffraction-wise), and something in between. Do you really need more fine grained control in a small-sensor camera?

I would be better off add a GX100 which as complement to the GRDI in the meantime until something better with low NR shows up.

If you mostly use low-ISO, the GX200 would be a better choice for numerous reasons which I listed in the past.

I would go with a GX100 then as it have faster AF.

I think that Samsung NX100 or NX200 with the 20mm 2.8 pancake seems to be the best option among the mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses, would I like to have some carry anywhere with big sensor. The 20mm 2.8 equals 30mm and can close-focus down to 17mm which actually is a marginally better than my current Sigma 24mm 2.8 super-wide II for Nikon F-mount.

What's the use of focusing so close when the lens casts a shadow on the subject? Good macro at the tele-end (Ricoh's forte) is IMHO much more useful.

I like wide-angle macro. It is good for walk-around-lens. I can often get close enough to insects with the GRDI and also the Nikon D1H wiht either Sigma 24mm 2.8 super-wide II or Nikon 28mm 2.8 Ais 0.2m mounted on the camera. Shadows have not been an issue with close-ups although the D1H are noticably bigger than a GRDI or one of the Samsung NX cameras.

I also like the shorter focal- length as it allow a faster aperture, shorter distance which means that camera-shake can have less impact on the final result.

While the GXR mount-module is tempting I can't say the same about the GXR A12 28mm. For two reasons. I've no interest in some lensor which is going to collect sensor-dust over time and probably can't be cleaned easy or safely by the user alone - Would probably need to send it in. Not either would I or anyone else benefit with better dynamic range or high iso by simply buying a GXRII body once it is released.

I don't find the APS-C lensors very tempting, for the very same reasons.

I don't like the lensor-concept either.

Ricoh better make their very own AF mount with very short flange-distance - That is going to make more sense for some long term than lensors.

Why design a new mounts when they can join someone else's? Sony's NEX E-Mount specifically has all that they need - open specifications, AF, AE, very short flange-distance.

Well. I didn't know that Sony had open specifications.

Sony have nothing but huge-lenses imo. If only the NX-mount could take Leica M-lenses with adapter then Sony would have had a much harder time trying to compete.
I wonder if Ricoh would make huge-lenses also if they gone with hat mount?

I've so far dismissed the NEX because I want to keep it small when it comes to mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses. That's what mirrorless are about to me and the reason I'll try and find something for my purpose.

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Prognathous Veteran Member • Posts: 9,151
Re: Ricoh G700 short review

schaki wrote:

I would go with a GX100 then as it have faster AF.

This is true in theory, but in practice, the GX200 combination of accurate AF, dedicated AF-L button and dedicated Snap focus button are likely to provide a higher number of accurately focused images when time is of the essence. In situations where you would need to repeatedly focus-recompose with the GX100, you can just click click click with the GX200.

I like wide-angle macro. It is good for walk-around-lens. I can often get close enough to insects with the GRDI and also the Nikon D1H wiht either Sigma 24mm 2.8 super-wide II or Nikon 28mm 2.8 Ais 0.2m mounted on the camera.

Are you actually able to fill the frame with an insect using a wide-angle lens? From my experience, insects usually fly away if you get too close, even if you approach them very slowly. Obviously this depends on the insect. Some are not easy to shoot with a 50mm lens, let alone a 24mm one.

Sony have nothing but huge-lenses imo. If only the NX-mount could take Leica M-lenses with adapter then Sony would have had a much harder time trying to compete.

Sony's only E-mount lens that can be small is small (the 16mm pancake). Their other NEX lenses cannot be small unless they'll redesign them to have smaller maximum apertures, and nobody other than me seem to want that. A folding design can reduce the size of the lens somewhat, but if the target is something pocketable then Sony will also need to limit the zoom range and maximum apertures, and of course leave distortion and vignetting uncorrected (optically), as this would increase the size too. I don't personally object to software-correction of these optical aberrations, but many people do.

An M-mount adapter would interest the few users who are willing to use lenses without AF and with only limited AE, and this is a very small market indeed.

I've so far dismissed the NEX because I want to keep it small when it comes to mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses. That's what mirrorless are about to me and the reason I'll try and find something for my purpose.

When you attach zoom lenses (with range similar to your G-series camera) you end up with significantly larger cameras. I still think that an enthusiast small-sensor camera with a 1/1.x sensor would be both smaller than mirrorless cameras and deliver much better IQ than G-series cameras.

Prog.

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OP schaki Senior Member • Posts: 2,306
Re: Ricoh G700 short review

Prognathous wrote:

schaki wrote:

I would go with a GX100 then as it have faster AF.

This is true in theory, but in practice, the GX200 combination of accurate AF, dedicated AF-L button and dedicated Snap focus button are likely to provide a higher number of accurately focused images when time is of the essence. In situations where you would need to repeatedly focus-recompose with the GX100, you can just click click click with the GX200.

I like wide-angle macro. It is good for walk-around-lens. I can often get close enough to insects with the GRDI and also the Nikon D1H wiht either Sigma 24mm 2.8 super-wide II or Nikon 28mm 2.8 Ais 0.2m mounted on the camera.

Are you actually able to fill the frame with an insect using a wide-angle lens? From my experience, insects usually fly away if you get too close, even if you approach them very slowly. Obviously this depends on the insect. Some are not easy to shoot with a 50mm lens, let alone a 24mm one.

No I don't manage to fill the frame but at least I can sometimes get close enough to get a good picture of it. It is not very easy and one have to be careful.

I've taken pictures of tadpoles with the 500SE at 28mm and also insects. The 400G wide only have macro at 30, or may it be 31 or 32mm as widest. Also two with the GRDI.

Sony have nothing but huge-lenses imo. If only the NX-mount could take Leica M-lenses with adapter then Sony would have had a much harder time trying to compete.

Sony's only E-mount lens that can be small is small (the 16mm pancake). Their other NEX lenses cannot be small unless they'll redesign them to have smaller maximum apertures, and nobody other than me seem to want that. A folding design can reduce the size of the lens somewhat, but if the target is something pocketable then Sony will also need to limit the zoom range and maximum apertures, and of course leave distortion and vignetting uncorrected (optically), as this would increase the size too. I don't personally object to software-correction of these optical aberrations, but many people do.

An M-mount adapter would interest the few users who are willing to use lenses without AF and with only limited AE, and this is a very small market indeed.

Still Ricoh manage to sell some GXR-M modules and NEX or m4/3 are not unpopular either for the same purpose. I couldn't find any wide lens which can be focused close for Leica M mount or even LTM if I remember correctly. Otherwise I would probably have had a GXR by now. But I realize that I'll have to take other options like the Samsung into account.

I've so far dismissed the NEX because I want to keep it small when it comes to mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses. That's what mirrorless are about to me and the reason I'll try and find something for my purpose.

When you attach zoom lenses (with range similar to your G-series camera) you end up with significantly larger cameras. I still think that an enthusiast small-sensor camera with a 1/1.x sensor would be both smaller than mirrorless cameras and deliver much better IQ than G-series cameras.

Yes sure. I wouldn't mount a zoom on a mirrorless camera with interchangeable lenses. If I go with some of the Samsung NX, the 20mm 2.8 pancake is going to be the lens of choice to use. Unfortunately I can't find it as a kit with NX200 or NX100 so I would have to buy that lens alone. But it's not very expensive so it is less of a problem.

I have not ruled out a Fuji X10 just yet either but thought I want some with OK high iso. Something that the GX100 and 200 can't do very well. Maybe I should look closer on the Canon Powershot S100 as well as the X10 although it gets mixed opinions.

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