Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

Started Sep 24, 2011 | Discussions
LeRentier
LeRentier Forum Pro • Posts: 13,622
Re: Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

It's OK to bring a nice DLSR and a couple of lenses to a wedding, provided that its is gift wrapped and matches the wishes of either the bride or the groom.

tkbslc Forum Pro • Posts: 11,900
Re: Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

I am trying to think how I could get any great shots without getting in the way. For the ceremony, I'd have to stand up or move to the front to get any shots without heads in them. For the posed portraits, I'd have to jump up to not get the photographer in them. Maybe you could grab some candids at the reception...

Confused of Malvern Senior Member • Posts: 1,208
Re: Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

I always take my dSLR but the key thing is to be unobtrusive - that's about more than just not getting in the pro photographer's way (which is a given), it's also about not irritating other guests or the happy couple. I don't mean you should be sneaky, far from it, just make sure that what you're doing doesn't detract from anyone else's enjoyment of the day.

Personally, I would never take pictures during the ceremony (I'm not particularly keen when the pro photographer does it either - but that seems to be the modern way) because that can't help but be obtrusive. You're principally there as a guest and you should be concentrating on the service, not your photos, at this stage.

When it comes to group shots outside afterwards, I'm not against snatching a shot in the few seconds between the Pro posing the group and him returning to his shooting position as long as I'm well out of his way - by definition, my picture is going to be different to his because it will be taken from a different angle and you can often capture the informal moments between shots that way. Also, look for other informal shots of the other guests which the Pro won't capture

Sometimes you have more opportunity for capturing photos than others depending upon home the event is organised and managed. If the opportunities don't present themselves - just relax and enjoy the wedding. As some one else has said, it's often a good idea to go and put the camera away in your room or in the car before the evening entertainment starts or it will just get in your way.

If I've managed to get any decent shots that are worth sharing then I usually put them into a slide show on a disc and give it to the Couple afterwards.

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Confused of Malvern
'The greatest fool can ask more than the wisest man can answer'

Craig Gillette Veteran Member • Posts: 9,543
It's the photographer, not the camera.

How you behave will determine if there is any rudeness involved. Don't be obtrusive, don't blast away during quiet moments, don't (no matter what camera you have) interfere with other guests or the pros by getting in their sight lines, etc., like standing up and leaning into the aisle, standing while others are sitting, flashing when no flash is appropriate.

Holding a camera up and shooting during delicate moments like prayers, scripture readings, etc., is poor behavior whether you are using a camera like a dslr, a phone or an iPad.

Vlad S Veteran Member • Posts: 3,750
I agree

Craig Gillette wrote:

How you behave will determine if there is any rudeness involved. Don't be obtrusive, don't blast away during quiet moments, don't (no matter what camera you have) interfere with other guests or the pros by getting in their sight lines, etc., like standing up and leaning into the aisle, standing while others are sitting, flashing when no flash is appropriate.

You were invited for the newlyweds and the guests to enjoy your company. It would be rude to withhold it from them because you are busy taking pictures. So do bring your camera, but remember that being a lively guest is your first obligation to the bride and groom.

When you take pictures try to gauge how disruptive it is to the conversations that people are trying to have with you or with one another and know when to put the camera down. Do not bring your biggest baddest lens simply because it has razor thin DOF or good in low light. Bring something that is not intimidating or distracting, so that people talk about the wedding and not about your camera.

Other than that, B&G usually love to see pictures of the party.

And make sure that you are not interfering with the official photographer and his/her assistants.

Vlad

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Kuppenbender
Kuppenbender Senior Member • Posts: 2,101
Just my opinion.

....no, unless specifically asked not to.

Now, having brought your DSLR to the wedding, don't annoy people with it. If you're one of those people who genuinely don't know when you're annoying people, don't bring the DSLR in the first place.

Just think about whether you'd mind someone taking photos of you at said event. It certainly has never bothered me.

As for the pro, do what the pros have suggested. Ignore them (unless they want to speak to you) but don't get in their way.

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sean000 Veteran Member • Posts: 7,326
Re: Ask yourself the following questions

VueFinder wrote:

This is a strange question, but wondering if a DSLR is simply to big and pro to bring to a friends wedding? I am a guest.

It depends... one wedding can be so different from another. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is the wedding in a place you really want to photograph?

  • Will there be a professional photographer?

  • How many photos do you plan to take, and why? This will likely depend on the answers to the first two questions. No professional photographer? It might make a nice gift for the bride & groom if you can get some better than average photos. They did hire a pro? It's okay to still bring a DSLR if you want to. Most pros don't care as long as you don't get in their way and into their shots. You probably won't be the only one with a DSLR anyway. And if the wedding is in a really special place, you might want to get some photos the professional doesn't have time to get because they need to focus on the B&G.

  • What is your relationship to the B&G? The closer you are, the more understandable it will be that you would want lots of photos of their wedding for your own collection.

  • Will you be attending the wedding with a date or a friend? How will this person feel if you are busy playing photographer the entire time?

In the end if it feels awkward you can always leave your camera bag in your car or set it down nearby where it will be safe. This is where a small camera is ideal, but you probably won't be the only DSLR wielding guest there. If you do take it, and there is a pro:

  • Avoid duplicating the shots the pro is getting. This will help you stay out of his/her way. This is especially true of the formal portraits. It's very annoying to get groups organized for formal portraits when everyone keeps looking at different cameras and flashes keep popping off. The professional needs every subject to stay focused on his/her camera.

  • Look for shots the pro isn't getting... especially at the reception. The pro can't photograph everyone and every detail all at once, so try to compliment rather than duplicate. You might end up with some unique and very special shots that the B&G will appreciate.

  • Ask the B&G if you can bring them anything... drinks or food, etc. They will be so busy that they might be dehydrated and very hungry. They will appreciate the gesture and will be all the more happy to pose for you.

  • Remember that you are there as a guest and that you want to mingle and visit with other guests. Spend more time chatting than shooting, but you can always keep an eye open for a good photo opportunity.

  • Have fun, and if you go with someone make sure that they have fun too.

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chiane Veteran Member • Posts: 4,397
Re: Ask yourself the following questions

Wheatfield, you are an azz in every single thread. Why someone would hire a jack wad like you to do anything is beyond me. Yeah, and real photographers wouldn't consider a 'wedding photographer' like you a pro either. I hope you stay out of their way when you see a real photo shoot. I am sure you'd be like 'hey, you know what camera I shoot weddings with" and they would tell you to get a real job.

Wheatfield
Wheatfield Veteran Member • Posts: 6,297
Re: Ask yourself the following questions

Well, that was a little uncalled for, don't you think?
It's amazing what people will say from behind the safety of their keyboard.

PicOne
PicOne Veteran Member • Posts: 6,931
Not rude... just dorky.

.. unless specifically invited/requested to do so by the Bride, Groom or one of their parents.

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mgd43 Veteran Member • Posts: 4,322
Re: Not rude... just dorky.

I usually bring a P&S and stay out of the pro's way. However, lately I see more and more people bringing DSLR's. I have a nephew's wedding in Nov. I may bring a DSLR. I haven't decided.

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James Cafferty Veteran Member • Posts: 5,364
Re: Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

VueFinder wrote:

This is a strange question, but wondering if a DSLR is simply to big and pro to bring to a friends wedding? I am a guest.

Yes! Bring your DSLR and take as many pictures as you like.( Of course, stay out of the Pro's way.)

Reason: Many years ago I shot several rolls of film at a Bridal Shower. Many of the attendees were older and several had traveled many miles to attend. When the other attendees saw my fancy Canon A1 film DSLR + gear --- they put their cameras away.

The next day, while on a business trip, my car was stolen. In the trunk, packed in a foam-lined case, was my camera and all of the film from the event. Unfortunately, my wife's cousin had only 5 pictures (total) from her once-in-a-lifetime family affair.

I now shoot with a high quality P&S camera (TL500) which fits in a case attached to my belt. DSLRs are too big and bulky --- and easily stolen if left unattended at the table.

PS - The car was found 4 weeks later, repaired and returned to me. No camera or gear was ever recovered.
--
All the best,
Jim

Photographers take pictures; the camera is only a tool.

rude Senior Member • Posts: 2,260
Re: Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

no i do it all the time. lol. in all seriousness i dont think so, but dont upstage the wedding photographer. rude

VueFinder wrote:

This is a strange question, but wondering if a DSLR is simply to big and pro to bring to a friends wedding? I am a guest.

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onlooker Veteran Member • Posts: 3,997
Re: Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

rude wrote:

no i do it all the time

I want you to know I will charge you for the keyboard if I don't get the coffee out of it.

rude Senior Member • Posts: 2,260
Re: Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

i used to be a computer tech. i can fix that for you. lol. rude

onlooker wrote:

rude wrote:

no i do it all the time

I want you to know I will charge you for the keyboard if I don't get the coffee out of it.

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markdavisphotography Regular Member • Posts: 178
Re: Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

I agree, as an amateur, I would like to chat up the pro, but he/she has a LOT going on shooting a wedding, and it's FAR better for them, AND the bride and groom, to leave them alone and let them concentrate on all that chaos they're trying to capture for the couple. It's the most stressful type of shoot and they really need to be left alone to do their job.

markdavisphotography Regular Member • Posts: 178
Re: Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

LOL! I would love that kind of gift if I go married!

Berghof Senior Member • Posts: 1,186
it's a much better option

Well,it's much better option than bringing along one of those Walimart disposable kameras.I don't see why anybody should object to a proper camera.People are being trained by the matrix B/S to object to anything and to report any abnormal activity that doeasn't comply with Al Gore's warming B/S and all the other ship loads of B/S ssss out there.I say bring your camera,get drunk,smoke a joint ,love a beautiful woman/man,eat like a pig and have a good time.Be a human being and not an imaginatory individual from TV screen.Just enjoy yourself and please,please,don't be PARANOID and make sure your middle finger is in good working order.
--
Berghof G.C.

RedFox88 Forum Pro • Posts: 27,245
All really depends, who knows...

A few years ago I brought my Canon 5D, Tamron 28-75, and 50 f1.4 to my niece's wedding. The wedding photographer was being paid to shoot 5x5 MF film, but he saw my camera and said he also uses a 20D had tried the 5D out and had a 5D on order. After the ceremony he said he'd let me borrow his 70-200 f2.8 IS during the reception. He did and I used it for about 2 hours. Incredibly nice guy, had been in the business for 30 years.

RedFox88 Forum Pro • Posts: 27,245
Re: Is it rude to bring DSLR to wedding?

rude wrote:

no i do it all the time. lol. in all seriousness i dont think so, but dont upstage the wedding photographer. rude

Having different or more expensive equipment than someone else doesn't mean you "upstage" that person. The photographer makes the photographs, an electronic device does not. Cameras, lenses, flashes are tools to get desired results.

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