Buying Epson R1900 or R2880, and have Question on Calibrations and Paper

Started Dec 3, 2010 | Discussions
m_markovich Regular Member • Posts: 128
Buying Epson R1900 or R2880, and have Question on Calibrations and Paper

Fellow forum members

I am moving away from HP Photo Smart 7960, more precisely I am moving it into my office; and I am pulling the trigger by tomorrow when Rebate deal expires on Epson R1900 or R2880. I was contemplating also Epson 3880, I am in photography as hobby for almost 40 years, but I have very little experience with printing, color matching and Monitor and printer calibrations. Therefore, I decided to postpone for at least few years getting more professional printer like 3880 and to go with Epson R1900 or 2880 and learn about areas I am missing. I have SC4 and if needed I could get CS5 for a fraction of the cost (educational institution). I am in the process of getting Adobe LR3 and I hope that with CS4 would be sufficient to handle printing.

My hardware is:

HP Voodoo Blackbird002, 8GB RAM Crucial Balistix memory, Dual NVIDA 8800 Ultra SLI, OZC 120GB SSD Sand Force controller based HD, several WD Raptors for storage and Dell 2709W LCD. The system is running Window 7 PRO

So to start with learning color matching and Monitor and printer calibrations my questions are:

1. What do I need as far as hardware goes, what is recommended as affordable solution for LCD calibration or do I need to get something that would do booth Printer and LCD calibration.

2. I am aware of existence of Epson paper “Sampler Pack,” and I shall order some, but I would like to take the opportunity of Epson current, I think until tomorrow, 40% discount on their papers, so what would be recommendation to get.

2a. I am aware that R1900 shines with glossy paper, but I would like trying, other types of high quality papers, so what would be the recommendation for paper to get?

4. And lastly for someone who prefer non-glossy papers, would it be better to get R2880 over R1900

Any input would ne appreciated.

Thanks,

Misha

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gib48189 Regular Member • Posts: 311
Re: Buying Epson R1900 or R2880, and have Question on Calibrations and Paper

I've had a R1900 for about 18 months, can't really say anything bad about it. My PC is has an AMD Phenom, 8G ram, just using on-board video, running Win7-64. I use Qimage for printing. I have an old Spyder3 Pro I use for monitor calibration, my monitor is a NEC 2090UXi.

I bought a refill kit from Inksupply, again using their ink and refillable cartridges since I've had the printer. (Very happy with the low-cost and high quality of their inks).

My preference is the Epson Luster paper, but use alot of Epson Premium matt for the folks who want matt paper. I am just finishing putting 30 calendars together, all pages are 8.5X11 pics with similar calendar pages. Quite a bit of printing, most I have really ever done in a short time. Printer has preformed very well for this.

I really can't tell you how the 1900 compares to matt prints from other units. I'm more or less a seasoned amature, but have been thrilled with the output of the 1900, the cost of printing with the inksupply re-fill kit makes this hobby affordable. I'm sure there are better printers in the market, but this fits all of my needs.

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SantaFeBill Veteran Member • Posts: 3,151
Re: Buying Epson R1900 or R2880, and have Question on Calibrations and Paper

m_markovich wrote:

Fellow forum members

4. And lastly for someone who prefer non-glossy papers, would it be better to get R2880 over R1900

I've no direct experience with the R1900, but I can tell you that the R2880 which I have does a superb job with non-glossy papers.

All of the the tests, posts, and comments I've read say the R2880 is better with non-glossy papers than the R1900.

As to picking either over the 3880 because you are inexperienced with color management, there's really no difference: To get the best out of either the R2880 or the 3880, you need to learn about this. The 3880 does require somewhat more computer/network understanding to set up.

RedFox88 Forum Pro • Posts: 30,472
Re: Buying Epson R1900 or R2880, and have Question on Calibrations and Paper

m_markovich wrote:

1. What do I need as far as hardware goes, what is recommended as affordable solution for LCD calibration or do I need to get something that would do booth Printer and LCD calibration.

I've had a Huey for a few years and it has done well.

2. I am aware of existence of Epson paper “Sampler Pack,” and I shall order some, but I would like to take the opportunity of Epson current, I think until tomorrow, 40% discount on their papers, so what would be recommendation to get.

Go slow in buying paper, from experience, or you will end up with a bunch of paper that you will never use.

2a. I am aware that R1900 shines with glossy paper, but I would like trying, other types of high quality papers, so what would be the recommendation for paper to get?

Typically Epson R1800(what I have) 1900 do not do well with Epson matte papers, results are very dull and low contrast. Red River Paper makes/sells good ones such as Red River Paper 50 lb matte that is provides very good saturation and contrast. I rarely ever print on "glossy" paper because of how reflective it is. I use a semi-gloss paper instead. Ilford Smooth Pearl is a lovely/ semi-gloss paper similar to Epson Luster but it costs much less.

4. And lastly for someone who prefer non-glossy papers, would it be better to get R2880 over R1900

I believe the type of inks are essentially the same between the R2880 and R1900 it's just that R2880 has the 2 light blacks, though the cartridges are different which may have to do with that R2880 has its smallest drop being 4 picoliter compared to 1.5 picoliter drops from R1900.

One thing about the R2880 is you can only have either the Matte Black or the Photo black cartridge in at a time. If you use a different paper that requires the other cartridge you must swap and the printer will go through an "ink charging cycle" that is typically done when installing a new cartridge which dumps about 2% out of every ink tank into the sponge at the bottom of the printer.

The R2880 has 2 light black tanks the R1900 does not have which provides from better black and white prints. But is that worth an extra $300 to you along with needing to swap ink tanks?

Really with the price of a 13 inch wide printer along with ink costs, it is really not a cost effective endeavor for printing unless you sell prints. Just think of how many prints made by a photo lab before you rack of the $800 cost of an R2880 or $450 of an R1900?

Leigh A. Wax Senior Member • Posts: 1,339
The question is, how is the 2880 with glossy media?

I bought an R1900 over the R2880, because I knew that most of my printing would be on "luster" type media. (I currently use Ilford Gold Fiber Silk almost exclusively). I'm now doing some B&W, and question if I made the best choice.

While it's clearly evident that the R1900 is inferior for high quality Black & White; and I recently read reviews that stated that gloss differential is no longer an issue with the latest Epson Pigment Ink formulas.

So, the question is, how does the R2880 compare to the R1900 on glossy, or luster media? If they compare favorably in that regard, then the R2880 is the more versatile printer; and on sale now at Epson USA for $550 a good bargain to boot.

Leigh

Steve House Regular Member • Posts: 146
Re: Buying Epson R1900 or R2880, and have Question on Calibrations and Paper

With an 8x10 print costing retail about $12 to have printed at a lab versus ~$2 for paper and ink on your own printer, 100 prints is the break even point. That's barely getting started with a new printer. (I'm old fashioned - a display hard copy print is still the ultimate objective for all my photography. Display on a computer monitor is for editing a shoot, not showing the results to others.)

RedFox88 wrote:

...> Really with the price of a 13 inch wide printer along with ink costs, it is really not a cost effective endeavor for printing unless you sell prints. Just think of how many prints made by a photo lab before you rack of the $800 cost of an R2880 or $450 of an R1900?

RedFox88 Forum Pro • Posts: 30,472
Re: Buying Epson R1900 or R2880, and have Question on Calibrations and Paper

Steve House wrote:

With an 8x10 print costing retail about $12 to have printed at a lab versus ~$2 for paper and ink on your own printer, 100 prints is the break even point. That's barely getting started with a new printer. (I'm old fashioned - a display hard copy print is still the ultimate objective for all my photography. Display on a computer monitor is for editing a shoot, not showing the results to others.)

Who are you using with bloated prices of $12 for an 8x10?! Even my most expensive local lab (a long time camera chain) is $4.99 and their prints are great! They are done on a main photo production system not a cheap dye sub inside a kiosk. So places like Walgreens, Walmart, Target will be even less. Will you be printing over 200 8x10's for home use in say 3 or 4 years? (about a life of a printer) Don't even think about printing 4x6's cost effectively on a home printer because they'll cost you at least 30 cents each and more likely 35 to 45 cents each on average including paper and ink - plus you'd have to get a real good deal on 4x6 paper to try to lower home 4x6 printing costs.

RedFox88 wrote:

...> Really with the price of a 13 inch wide printer along with ink costs, it is really not a cost effective endeavor for printing unless you sell prints. Just think of how many prints made by a photo lab before you rack of the $800 cost of an R2880 or $450 of an R1900?

Vernon D Rainwater Forum Pro • Posts: 14,584
Re: Buying Epson R1900 or R2880, and have Question on Calibrations and Paper

SantaFeBill wrote:

The 3880 does require somewhat more computer/network understanding to set > up.

Of course, the 3880 also has support for using USB 2.0 which is VERY basic to setup.
--
Vernon...

Tillman Kleinhans Regular Member • Posts: 372
Re: The question is, how is the 2880 with glossy media?

When my trusty 1270 died in May, I had to decide 1900, 2880 or 3880. Almost bought the 3880 as the cost per print is low due to the large tankss, but as I don't make many prints a year, the initial costs put me off. Finally, after seeing 2880 prints in the 'flesh', both colour and mono, I decided on that one. Never regretted it, fantastic prints (colour mono) with no colour management, so what'll they be like when I get around to using the the eyeone!

I haven't worked out the cost involved, but my local Costco does a good 12 x 18 for £2.20, but I prefer to be in total control.

I only use Ilford Smooth Pearl, Permajet Oyster or Ilford Fibre Gold. I don't like high gloss prints, though I might try some textured paper if I can be bothered to change cartridges.

Do yourself a favour, get the 2880.
--
Tillman Kleinhans ARPS EFIAP DPAGB
http://www.tkimages.co.uk
Marj, my wife and best friend, says my passions are obsessions.

OP m_markovich Regular Member • Posts: 128
Re: The question is, how is the 2880 with glossy media?

Part#1

gib48189 wrote:

I bought a refill kit from Inksupply, again using their ink and refillable cartridges since I've had the printer. (Very happy with the low-cost and high quality of their inks).

Anyone can confirm that using non-OEM (Epson) ink does not affect printer operation (clogging etc) and provide same quality-color output; I guess this opens another topic, does anyone even recommend using CIS system and would this affect printer and quality of prints in the same manner as possibly using 3rd party refills? I am well aware of Epson Official position on this two issues.

SantaFeBill wrote:
The 3880 does require somewhat more computer/network understanding to set up.

I am in IT business so the network setup is the easiest part of handling any printer for me and quite often the USB printers setup is lot harder than Ethernet 

Vernon D Rainwater wrote:

Of course, the 3880 also has support for using USB 2.0 which is VERY basic to setup.

Vernon if things go wrong with VERY basic USB setup, could I contact you… just kidding  could not resist…

RedFox88 wrote:
I’ve had a Huey for a few years and it has done well.

I looked more into color calibration since I decided to get into this, and I am considering Colormunki Photo

RedFox88 wrote:

Go slow in buying paper, from experience, or you will end up with a bunch of paper that you will never use.

I wish I read this before I purchased more “sampler” papers than I would use before I retire in about 10 years 

Here is what I ordered, the count is 152 sheets of 8.5 x 11”

Epson Signature Worthy Sample Pack (8.5 x 11", 14 Sheets) Contains 2 packs, total 28 sheets

Red River Paper Pigment Ink Sample Kit (8.5 x 11", 14 Sheets) Contains 2 packs, total 72 sheets

From Atlex Sample Packs as folows:

Moab Digital Fine Art Sample Pack 8.5x11 24 sheets Contains 1 pack, total 24 sheets
BW SAMPLES 8.5 x 11” Contains 1 pack, total 10 sheets
Hahnemuhle NEW SAMPLE PACK 8.5 x 11” Contains 1 pack, total 14 sheets
Canson Sample Pack 8.5 x 11” Contains 1 pack, total 4 sheets

RedFox88 wrote:

Red River Paper makes/sells good ones such as Red River Paper 50 lb matte that is provides very good saturation and contrast.

This should a part of the Sample packs I ordered from Red River Papers (50lb. Premium Matte Double Sided and 60lb. Premium Matte Double Sided) and I am looking forward seeing the results.

RedFox88 wrote:

I believe the type of inks are essentially the same between the R2880 and R1900.

It is my understanding that is not the case, Epson Web Site states that Epson R1900 uses UltraChrome Hi-Gloss 2 pigment ink and the Epson R2880 uses UltraChrome K3™ with Vivid Magenta

RedFox88 wrote:

it's just that R2880 has the 2 light blacks, though the cartridges are different which may have to do with that R2880 has its smallest drop being 4 picoliter compared to 1.5 picoliter drops from R1900.
and

One thing about the R2880 is you can only have either the Matte Black or the Photo black cartridge in at a time.

You are correct the R2880 has Photo or Matte Black, Cyan, Vivid Magenta, Yellow, Light Cyan, Vivid Light Magenta, Light Black, Light Light Black

RedFox88 wrote:

If you use a different paper that requires the other cartridge you must swap and the printer will go through an "ink charging cycle" that is typically done when installing a new cartridge which dumps about 2% out of every ink tank into the sponge at the bottom of the printer.

You are correct on this as well, I read somewhere that actually it uses different amount of ink during the swap form Photo to Matte Black and vice versa.

RedFox88 wrote:

The R2880 has 2 light black tanks the R1900 does not have which provides from better black and white prints.

You are correct on this as well and that is one of the thing that finally sway me to purchase R2880, my current old Dinosaur of HP Photosmart 7960 I think it has CMY in one (HP 57) cartridge LC, LM and Black (HP58) and three level of grays (HP59) so Epson R2880 with Matte Black, Light Black and Light Light Black sounded like déjà vie and by that I mean prints out of HP Photosmart 7960 are exceptionally good though limited to 8.5 x 11” so I expect much more out of R2880 when it comes to color and especially B&W.

Leigh A. Wax wrote:
how does the R2880 compare to the R1900 on glossy, or luster media?

Well I have neither one and I choose R2880 over R1900 because everything I read pointed out that for printing on matte media is an excellent choice, some reviewers placed, when printing B&W, R2880 slightly ahead of Stylus Pro 3880 that was also on my ”short” list but I hold-off on that one.

Tillman Kleinhans wrote:

When my trusty 1270 died in May, I had to decide 1900, 2880 or 3880. Almost bought the 3880 as the cost per print is low due to the large tankss, but as I don't make many prints a year, the initial costs put me off. Finally, after seeing 2880 prints in the 'flesh', both colour and mono, I decided on that one. Never regretted it, fantastic prints (colour mono) with no colour management, so what'll they be like when I get around to using the the eyeone!

Well this summarize it for me and I ended-up with same conclusion an placed the order for R2880 that arrives today.

P.S. Apologize since I could not figure-out how to change the text color in red for: “someone wrote” something and the "something" part so feel free to educate me...

Please see Part#2 why...

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OP m_markovich Regular Member • Posts: 128
Re: The question is, how is the 2880 with glossy media?

Part #2
To reiterate:

After month-long research, mostly by reading, unfortunately I did not have opportunity to “see” and “touch” one single print out of my three choices Epson’s 3880, 2880 or 1900, what a pity since I was this year in Cologne Germany for Photokina, first time again after more than 25 years and I managed to spent almost no time with Epson, so anyway I deiced on 2880 and here is why:

1. I do not need the printer at all since I print not much after all.

2. I am aware that “outsourcing” print jobs and color management to professional shop would be cheaper, but…
3. I want the printer.

4. I want the printer that is capable of professional level in color as well in B&W photography.

5. Please just do not ask me why did I purchased Epson Artisan 810 that is now sitting in the box and I forgot to return it and also please do not ask me why I went on and purchased set of HP inks for my Dinosaur HP Photosmart 7960 printers, this just give you an idea about my brilliant way of thinking ha-ha… though some people around me, telling me that it is not me, it “something” that they put in the water here in California, also I am hearing some rotors of hovering Black Helicopters above…

6. Anyway, even if I only do one 13 x 19” print a month I still I want to spent more time and learn about color management; make my own “product” from taking a shot, to fiddling with Colormunki (on my wish list) printer papers, ICC profiles, Adobe CS4/5 or LR3 editing, it is hobby after all and it should be fun … 

7. From what I read Epson Stylus Pro 3880 and R2880 share many things as far as technology, to me it appear that they booth use identical print-heads and ink, there are some differences, since Stylus Pro 3880 is the “beginning” of their “professional” line and R280 is classified only as “wide-format” but not as professional.”

8. When I was deciding a day before Rebate expiration on 3880 I already dropped out of race R1900 since I am not interested in printing on glossy media at all.

9. So for me loosing ink during R2880 black media switching will not be an issue at all, Ok I am laying I shall tray some glossy or semi-glossy papers form sample pack I purchased and then switch and stay with matte media.

10. Bottom line 3880 was after the rebate around $819 at B&H and I bought R2880 from Epson for $390.24 ( MSRP $799 - $300 Rebate and - $108.76 a tip from the fellow forum member with additional discount)

11. So the cost of R2880 was half of the price of 3880, and I figure-out that the difference eventually could go into maybe Colormunki.

12. Having said what I wrote in my #11, let me eat it back, since I actually have purchased MORE expensive printer when I bought R2880.

13. Epson Stylus Pro 3880 is 9 colors and I think it has only 8 “active” ink cartridges and each contains 80 ml of ink; and lets go by Epson list price for the full-set $59.95 x 9 = $539.95

14. Epson R2880 is also 9 colors and I think it also has only 8 “active” ink cartridges and each contains around 11 ml of ink; and lets go by Epson list price for the full-set $13.29 x 9 = $119.61

15. So to purchase an equal amount that comes with 3880 for R2800 let’s do the math 80ml/11ml = 7.27;

16. So I need to buy 7.27 refills for R2800 to buy an equal amount of ink that 3800 holds and that cost $119.61 x 7.27 = $869.56
17. So Epson 3880 80 ml ink cost is $539.95 and R2880 80 ml ink cost is $869.56

18. Should I return the R2880 and buy 3880 even without rebate, it is clear which one cost less to operate, except…

19. Well except for one little thing… yes it is crazy to buy R2880 and anticipate printing one or two large printouts a month, but it would be insane and should be punishable by institualization if one do the same amount of printing and buy 3880.

20. The only thing that is a real concern for me is that after all R2800 cartridges size are fact “Mickey Mouse” size and there is no going around that problem other than stocking up on the ink.

21. One day I still may purchase Epson professional printer like Stylus Pro 4900 or eventual replacement for 3880 given that would come with Epson UltraChrome® HDR Ink technology

Thank you for all of the comments and reading.

Misha

P.S. Apologize since I could not figure-out how to change the text color in red for: “someone wrote” something and the "something" part so feel free to educate me, also a stupid question how one actually knows when is needed to change photo and mate black cartridges according to media used, is it just an error and try, does it printer warn you or is it something else?

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Steve House Regular Member • Posts: 146
Re: Buying Epson R1900 or R2880, and have Question on Calibrations and Paper

You're going to Walmart for prints you are going to mount and frame for exhibit??? Even if a basic straight print runs you $6 each, the cost of doing serious work is going to sway in favour of owning your own printer very quickly. I'm not talking about snaps of the kids birthday or vacation record shots but instead aiming to be a serious practitioner producing professional or fine-arts level of quality work, even if you're actually doing it just for personal enjoyment and not as a profession. I can't imagine going to Walgreens to print a portfolio I'd feel comfortable showing to a gallery curator in hopes of booking a show.

RedFox88 wrote:

Who are you using with bloated prices of $12 for an 8x10?! Even my most expensive local lab (a long time camera chain) is $4.99 and their prints are great! They are done on a main photo production system not a cheap dye sub inside a kiosk. So places like Walgreens, Walmart, Target will be even less. ...

Dominic.Chan Veteran Member • Posts: 6,168
Re: The question is, how is the 2880 with glossy media?

Leigh A. Wax wrote:

While it's clearly evident that the R1900 is inferior for high quality Black & White; and I recently read reviews that stated that gloss differential is no longer an issue with the latest Epson Pigment Ink formulas.

AFAIK, there hasn't been any significant changes in the Epson K3 pigment, in terms of gloss differential (GD). How noticeable GD is, depends on the paper, reviewers eyes, and the viewing light (it is more noticeable under diffused lighting).

The Epson Exhibition Fibre Paper is among the best, in terms of minimizing GD. Kodka papers are also very good. Epson Premium Glossy is not good for GD, nor is the Epson Premium Lustre. The Red River Lustre and Satin papers are also not good for GD.

Leigh A. Wax Senior Member • Posts: 1,339
GLOP on a 2880 ( fantasy).

I recently tried B&W, for the first time, with my R1900 with Ilford Gold Fibre Silk using the Ilford settings & profile/ Photoshop CS5 managing colors; and I can't detect any color cast/s whatsoever. (B&W conversion done with NIK Silver FX)

Of course, I can't judge overall tonality comparisons without duplicating the process on a 2880 or 3880.

I wondered, since systems like Jon Cone's can configure drivers to control Print Heads in a manner different than the original Epson configuration--- Why couldn't Epson allow configuration of the 2880/3880 printers to replace the Matte Black cart with GLOP?

It wouldn't be practical in a "swap" configuration, as you'd have to flush the head each time; but for those printing exclusively on "luster" type media, where MB is not used anyway, you'd have the benefit of Lt Blk, Lt Lt Blk, and GLOP as well.

Leigh

Dominic.Chan Veteran Member • Posts: 6,168
Re: GLOP on a 2880 ( fantasy).

Leigh A. Wax wrote:

I wondered, since systems like Jon Cone's can configure drivers to control Print Heads in a manner different than the original Epson configuration

I don't think this can be done unless you replace the Epson driver with RIP.

RedFox88 Forum Pro • Posts: 30,472
OP said hobby

Steve House wrote:

You're going to Walmart for prints you are going to mount and frame for exhibit??? Even if a basic straight print runs you $6 each, the cost of doing serious work is going to sway in favour of owning your own printer very quickly. I'm not talking about snaps of the kids birthday or vacation record shots but instead aiming to be a serious practitioner producing professional or fine-arts level of quality work, even if you're actually doing it just for personal enjoyment and not as a profession. I can't imagine going to Walgreens to print a portfolio I'd feel comfortable showing to a gallery curator in hopes of booking a show.

The OP stated photography as been a hobby. I haven't read about using these proposed prints for a portfolio or professional fine arts level work. Stick to the topic. Buying a $850 printer, or even a $1500 R3800/3880, is not something that is ever going to pay for itself unless you sell prints from it. Maybe the OP just wants to try making his own prints, though he'll find it to be a rather expensive learning process.

Any print/photo lab charging $12 for an 8x10 print is really over charging!

RedFox88 wrote:

Who are you using with bloated prices of $12 for an 8x10?! Even my most expensive local lab (a long time camera chain) is $4.99 and their prints are great! They are done on a main photo production system not a cheap dye sub inside a kiosk. So places like Walgreens, Walmart, Target will be even less. ...

RedFox88 Forum Pro • Posts: 30,472
Re: The question is, how is the 2880 with glossy media?

m_markovich wrote:

7. From what I read Epson Stylus Pro 3880 and R2880 share many things as far as technology, to me it appear that they booth use identical print-heads and ink, there are some differences, since Stylus Pro 3880 is the “beginning” of their “professional” line and R280 is classified only as “wide-format” but not as professional.”

From what I heard, the R3800/3880 have bigger ink tanks, which the ink inside costs less per ounce and may do better on not dumping so much ink during ink charging cycles. And when you buy one of them, you are actually getting about $600 of ink which makes the cost of the actual printer rather reasonable. Though you need to be able to do a decent volume of prints to not have your ink tanks dry up.

13. Epson Stylus Pro 3880 is 9 colors and I think it has only 8 “active” ink cartridges and each contains 80 ml of ink; and lets go by Epson list price for the full-set $59.95 x 9 = $539.95

Yep.

14. Epson R2880 is also 9 colors and I think it also has only 8 “active” ink cartridges and each contains around 11 ml of ink; and lets go by Epson list price for the full-set $13.29 x 9 = $119.61

15. So to purchase an equal amount that comes with 3880 for R2800 let’s do the math 80ml/11ml = 7.27;

16. So I need to buy 7.27 refills for R2800 to buy an equal amount of ink that 3800 holds and that cost $119.61 x 7.27 = $869.56
17. So Epson 3880 80 ml ink cost is $539.95 and R2880 80 ml ink cost is $869.56

18. Should I return the R2880 and buy 3880 even without rebate, it is clear which one cost less to operate, except…

20. The only thing that is a real concern for me is that after all R2800 cartridges size are fact “Mickey Mouse” size and there is no going around that problem other than stocking up on the ink.

It seems many people buy a CIS, continuous ink system, for their R1800/1900/2800/2880 and have good results. I have not gone this route with my R1800. Or you can buy 3rd party inks in recycled cartridges on Ebay for about $4 per cartridge.

21. One day I still may purchase Epson professional printer like Stylus Pro 4900 or eventual replacement for 3880 given that would come with Epson UltraChrome® HDR Ink technology

P.S. Apologize since I could not figure-out how to change the text color in red for: “someone wrote” something and the "something" part so feel free to educate me, also a stupid question how one actually knows when is needed to change photo and mate black cartridges according to media used, is it just an error and try, does it printer warn you or is it something else?

Read the manual? Maybe the printer/computer will tell you based upon the paper selection in the printer driver?

And I'm sure you know that glossy/resin-coated papers use a quite bit less ink than non-coated papers.

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