shooting in the "Raw"

Started Jul 12, 2002 | Discussions
Thomas Regular Member • Posts: 268
shooting in the "Raw"

For those of you that thought I was referring to nudity, sorry.

How much space do the raw files take up? Is it advantageous to shoot RAW at a wedding for example? Or does it take up too much space on the cards?

I am a S1 user anxiously awaiting my S2 which should be here in about a week...any info on RAW you can give me is appreciated--especially as it applies to large family wall portraits as this has been the only thing I have had problems with on the S1. How is the Fuji software that comes with the camera?
--
Thomas

Mike Flood
Mike Flood Senior Member • Posts: 1,592
Re: shooting in the "Raw"

Thomas wrote:

For those of you that thought I was referring to nudity, sorry.

How much space do the raw files take up? Is it advantageous to
shoot RAW at a wedding for example? Or does it take up too much
space on the cards?

I am a S1 user anxiously awaiting my S2 which should be here in
about a week...any info on RAW you can give me is
appreciated--especially as it applies to large family wall
portraits as this has been the only thing I have had problems with
on the S1. How is the Fuji software that comes with the camera?
--
Thomas

All Raw format files are just over 12+ megabytes.
The advantage, in my view is that you get the full resolution image.

Saving the same file as RGB.TIF would have yielded a 35+ meg file and you can't make changes like you can in processing Raw files.

Since the original raw image file is not touched you can make multiple copies at different image sizes and other settings. Compare them, use small ones for web pages, use the largest ones for great prints.

Raw format saved my bacon this morning.

Last night the shots I was doing were with available incandesant light in the living room. Today I prepared to replace the old rusty garden windmill of my wife's with a new one. I wanted before and after photos.

I set up the tripod, composed the shot and took several including her and our dog.
Then I took the old windmill down, put the new one in and shot more pictures.
I got in the house and found that I had failed to check the camera settings.
(of course I know no one else ever does that)

I had left the color on "Incandesant" so all the shots outside were very much too blue. I began thinking about what Photoshop settings I would use to do the color correction. Then I looked at them with Finepix Viewer, clicked on them and started up the Raw Image convertor.

Then instead of selecting "camera settings" for the image conversion I selected "custom settings", changed the color to "Fine" (I don't know why they don't call that "Daylight") and made a couple of other setting changes for sharpness, set the size at 1440 X 960 and let it do the conversions.

Before you do the conversion you can see what the results of the settings you select in the preview window.

Saved me a lot of fiddling with Photoshop

If there's one feature of the S2 I like compared to the S1, it's gotta be the Raw file mode.

By the way, if you view the images from the camera memory in the Fuji Finepix viewer you can click on an icon in the viewer to start either a version that saves a .tiff file with all the Exif info intact or just some of the Exif info. The raw files can be saved as two different type of 16 bit files for use with Photoshop or other apps that can handle 16 bit or as 8 bit sRGB files.

Have fun

frank barret Regular Member • Posts: 317
see the manual

You can download the complete hyper utility and raw convertion manual in pdf format and see the specifications.

http://home.fujifilm.com/products/digital/digitalcamera/fxs2pro/

by the way, what is color space in practical terms, and which one is better for Mac, etc.

Mike Flood wrote:

Thomas wrote:

For those of you that thought I was referring to nudity, sorry.

How much space do the raw files take up? Is it advantageous to
shoot RAW at a wedding for example? Or does it take up too much
space on the cards?

I am a S1 user anxiously awaiting my S2 which should be here in
about a week...any info on RAW you can give me is
appreciated--especially as it applies to large family wall
portraits as this has been the only thing I have had problems with
on the S1. How is the Fuji software that comes with the camera?
--
Thomas

All Raw format files are just over 12+ megabytes.
The advantage, in my view is that you get the full resolution image.
Saving the same file as RGB.TIF would have yielded a 35+ meg file
and you can't make changes like you can in processing Raw files.
Since the original raw image file is not touched you can make
multiple copies at different image sizes and other settings.
Compare them, use small ones for web pages, use the largest ones
for great prints.

Raw format saved my bacon this morning.
Last night the shots I was doing were with available incandesant
light in the living room. Today I prepared to replace the old rusty
garden windmill of my wife's with a new one. I wanted before and
after photos.
I set up the tripod, composed the shot and took several including
her and our dog.
Then I took the old windmill down, put the new one in and shot more
pictures.
I got in the house and found that I had failed to check the camera
settings.
(of course I know no one else ever does that)
I had left the color on "Incandesant" so all the shots outside were
very much too blue. I began thinking about what Photoshop settings
I would use to do the color correction. Then I looked at them with
Finepix Viewer, clicked on them and started up the Raw Image
convertor.
Then instead of selecting "camera settings" for the image
conversion I selected "custom settings", changed the color to
"Fine" (I don't know why they don't call that "Daylight") and made
a couple of other setting changes for sharpness, set the size at
1440 X 960 and let it do the conversions.
Before you do the conversion you can see what the results of the
settings you select in the preview window.

Saved me a lot of fiddling with Photoshop
If there's one feature of the S2 I like compared to the S1, it's
gotta be the Raw file mode.

By the way, if you view the images from the camera memory in the
Fuji Finepix viewer you can click on an icon in the viewer to start
either a version that saves a .tiff file with all the Exif info
intact or just some of the Exif info. The raw files can be saved
as two different type of 16 bit files for use with Photoshop or
other apps that can handle 16 bit or as 8 bit sRGB files.

Have fun

-- hide signature --

Frank Barret

Raul Veteran Member • Posts: 7,960
Re: shooting in the "Raw"

You did trick me into your thread: nice caption, that is what I call
marketing.

I have a D1 and S1 and a D1x. I shall be buying the S2.

The Fuji conversion sooftware better be good as Nikon is.

Enjoy and accept my envy
Raul

Muzz Forum Member • Posts: 79
Re: shooting in the "Raw"

I'm interested in the raw format - does the S2 also write a jpg file like the Canon D60 so you can view "normal" color when reviewing images on the lcd or do you get the"green" look?

Muzz

OP Thomas Regular Member • Posts: 268
Re: shooting in the "Raw"

Thanks Mike!

Do the Raw files have significantly more detail than capturing as a jpeg? I am wondering here about wall portraiture specifically.

Thomas

Raul Veteran Member • Posts: 7,960
Re: shooting in the "Raw"

You can sure view in camera the raw files as they are with no
green(?) look.
Raul

Muzz wrote:

I'm interested in the raw format - does the S2 also write a jpg
file like the Canon D60 so you can view "normal" color when
reviewing images on the lcd or do you get the"green" look?

Muzz

Mike Flood
Mike Flood Senior Member • Posts: 1,592
Re: "Raw" vs Jpg

Thomas wrote:

Thanks Mike!

Do the Raw files have significantly more detail than capturing as a
jpeg? I am wondering here about wall portraiture specifically.

Thomas

There should be the maximum amount of detail the camera can deliver, saved as Raw.

It's difficult to make a full comparison since you can't (at least I can't) view a screen filling Raw image. But saving your raw file as a 16 bit tiff and opening it in Photoshop should be far superior to a file saved with any degree of jpg compression. I have only printed one of the file that was originally raw. It looks great but then so did most of the ones I shot with my S1.

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